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Publications (10 of 113) Show all publications
Åkerfeldt, E., Klintberg, L., Sturesson, P. & Thornell, G. (2018). Taking ceramic microcomponents to higher temperatures. In: : . Paper presented at Micronano System Workshop (MSW 2018).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Taking ceramic microcomponents to higher temperatures
2018 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-363404 (URN)
Conference
Micronano System Workshop (MSW 2018)
Available from: 2018-10-18 Created: 2018-10-18 Last updated: 2018-10-18
Sturesson, P., Khaji, Z., Klintberg, L. & Thornell, G. (2017). Ceramic Pressure Sensor for High Temperatures – Investigation of the Effect of Metallizationon on Read Range. IEEE Sensors Journal, 17(8), 2411-2421
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Ceramic Pressure Sensor for High Temperatures – Investigation of the Effect of Metallizationon on Read Range
2017 (English)In: IEEE Sensors Journal, ISSN 1530-437X, E-ISSN 1558-1748, Vol. 17, no 8, p. 2411-2421Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A study on the relationship between circuit metallization, made by double-layer screen printing of platinum and electroplating of silver on top of platinum, and its impact on practical read range of ceramic LC resonators for high-temperature pressure measurements is presented. Also included is the first realization of membranes by draping a graphite insert with ceramic green body sheets. As a quality factor circuit reference, two-port microstrip meander devices were positively evaluated and to study interdiffusion between silver and platinum, test samples were annealed at 500 degrees C, 700 degrees C, and 900 degrees C for 4, 36, 72, and 96 h. The LC resonators were fabricated with both metallization methods, and the practical read range at room temperature was evaluated. Pressure-sensitive membranes were characterized for pressures up to 2.5 bar at room temperature, 500 degrees C and up to 900 degrees C. Samples electroplated with silver exhibited performance equal to or better than double-layer platinum samples for up to 60 h at 500 degrees C, 20 h at 700 degrees C, and for 1 h at 900 degrees C, which was correlated with the degree of interdiffusion as determined from cross-sectional analysis. The LC resonator samples with double-layer platinum exhibited a read range of 61 mm, and the samples with platinum and silver exhibited a read range of 59 mm. The lowest sheet resistance, and, thereby, the highest read range of 86 mm, was obtained with a silver electroplated LC resonator sample after 36 h of annealing at 500 degrees C.

Keywords
Alternative metallization, ceramic membrane, harsh environment sensor, high temperature co-fired ceramics (HTCC), HTCC processing, LC resonator, pressure sensor, wireless reading
National Category
Accelerator Physics and Instrumentation Engineering and Technology
Research subject
Engineering Science with specialization in Microsystems Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-302852 (URN)10.1109/JSEN.2017.2671418 (DOI)000398890800016 ()
Available from: 2016-09-11 Created: 2016-09-11 Last updated: 2018-08-03Bibliographically approved
Khaji, Z., Klintberg, L., Barbade, D., Palmer, K. & Thornell, G. (2017). Endurance and Failure of an Alumina-based Monopropellant Microthruster with Integrated Heater, Catalytic Bed and Temperature Sensors. Journal of Micromechanics and Microengineering, 27(5), 1-11, Article ID 055011.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Endurance and Failure of an Alumina-based Monopropellant Microthruster with Integrated Heater, Catalytic Bed and Temperature Sensors
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2017 (English)In: Journal of Micromechanics and Microengineering, ISSN 0960-1317, E-ISSN 1361-6439, Vol. 27, no 5, p. 1-11, article id 055011Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Monopropellant ceramic microthrusters with an integrated heater, catalytic bed and two temperature sensors, but of various designs, were manufactured by milling a fluidic channel and chamber, and a nozzle, and screen printing platinum patterns on green tapes of alumina that were stacked and laminated before sintering. In order to increase the surface area of the catalytic bed, the platinum paste was mixed with a sacrificial paste that disappeared during sintering, to leave behind a porous and rough layer. As an early development level in manufacturing robust and high-temperature tolerant microthrusters, the influence of design on the temperature gradients and dry temperature tolerance of the devices was studied. On average, the small reaction chambers showed a more than 1.5 times higher dry temperature tolerance (in centigrade) compared to devices with larger chambers, independent of the heater and device size. However, for a given temperature, big devices consumed on average 2.9 times more power than the small ones. It was also found that over the same area and under the same heating conditions, devices with small chambers were subjected to approximately 40% smaller temperature differences. A pressure test done on two small devices with small chambers revealed that pressures of at least 26.3 bar could be tolerated. Above this pressure, the interfaces failed but the devices were not damaged. To investigate the cooling effect of the micropropellant, the endurance of a full thruster was also studied under wet testing where it was fed with 31 wt.% hydrogen peroxide. The thruster demonstrated complete evaporation and/or full decomposition at a power above 3.7 W for a propellant flow of 50 mu l min(-1). At this power, the catalytic bed locally reached a temperature of 147 degrees C. The component was successfully heated to an operating temperature of 307 degrees C, where it cracked. Under these firing conditions, and assuming complete decomposition, calculations give a thrust and specific impulse of 0.96 mN and 106 s, respectively. In the case of evaporation, the corresponding values are calculated to be 0.84 mN and 92 s.

Keywords
HTCC, hydrogen peroxide, platinum, heater, catalytic bed, temperature sensor, monopropellant microthruster
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Research subject
Engineering Science with specialization in Microsystems Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-302849 (URN)10.1088/1361-6439/aa6550 (DOI)000398327700003 ()
Funder
Swedish National Space BoardKnut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation
Available from: 2016-09-11 Created: 2016-09-11 Last updated: 2017-05-11Bibliographically approved
Sturesson, P., Berglund, M., Söderberg, J., Klintberg, L., Persson, A. & Thornell, G. (2016). Fabrication of Suspended All-Metal Sensor Elements in Ceramic Laminates. In: Proc. of Micronano System Workshop 2016, Lund, Sweden, May 17-18, 2016: . Paper presented at Micronano System Workshop (MSW2016) Lund, Sweden, May 17-18, 2016.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Fabrication of Suspended All-Metal Sensor Elements in Ceramic Laminates
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2016 (English)In: Proc. of Micronano System Workshop 2016, Lund, Sweden, May 17-18, 2016, 2016Conference paper, Published paper (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

To target a wide range of high-temperature applications [1-4], the Ångström Space Technology Centre has added High-Temperature Co-fired Ceramics, HTTC, technology to its repertoire. Usually, this technology follows a processing scheme where thin sheets of green-body ceramics are metallized through screen printing and structured by embossing, punching or milling, before they are laminated and sintered to form components. A limitation with this, is the difficulty of realizing freely suspended metal structures, which is a disadvantage in, e.g., the fabrication of calorimetric sensors or electric field probes. In this work, the embedding of platinum wires in HTCC is explored experimentally, and demonstrated for use in pressure and plasma I-V sensing.

Keywords
Microsensors, Bond WIre, Harsh Environments, High Temperatures, Ceramic Systems
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Research subject
Engineering Science with specialization in Microwave Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-309945 (URN)
Conference
Micronano System Workshop (MSW2016) Lund, Sweden, May 17-18, 2016
Available from: 2016-12-08 Created: 2016-12-08 Last updated: 2017-05-16
Khaji, Z., Klintberg, L. & Thornell, G. (2016). Manufacturing and characterization of a ceramic single-use microvalve. Journal of Micromechanics and Microengineering, 26(9), Article ID 095002.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Manufacturing and characterization of a ceramic single-use microvalve
2016 (English)In: Journal of Micromechanics and Microengineering, ISSN 0960-1317, E-ISSN 1361-6439, Vol. 26, no 9, article id 095002Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We present the manufacturing and characterization of a ceramic single-use microvalve withthe potential to be integrated in lab-on-a-chip devices, and forsee its utilization in space andother demanding applications. A 3 mm diameter membrane was used as the flow barrier, andthe opening mechanism was based on cracking the membrane by inducing thermal stresses onit with fast and localized resistive heating.

Four manufacturing schemes based on high-temperature co-fired ceramic technology werestudied. Three designs for the integrated heaters and two thicknesses of 40 and 120 μmfor the membranes were considered, and the heat distribution over their membranes, therequired heating energies, their opening mode, and the flows admitted through were compared.Furthermore, the effect of applying +1 and −1 bar pressure difference on the membraneduring cracking was investigated. Thick membranes demonstrated unpromising results forlow-pressure applications since the heating either resulted in microcracks or cracking of thewhole chip. Because of the higher pressure tolerance of the thick membranes, the designwith microcracks can be considered for high-pressure applications where flow is facilitatedanyway. Thin membranes, on the other hand, showed different opening sizes depending onheater design and, consequently, heat distribution over the membranes, from microcracks toholes with sizes of 3–100% of the membrane area. For all the designs, applying +1 bar overpressure contributed to bigger openings, whereas −1 bar pressure difference only did so forone of the designs, resulting in smaller openings for the other two. The energy required forbreaking these membranes was a few hundred mJ with no significant dependence on designand applied pressure. The maximum sustainable pressure of the valve for the current designand thin membranes was 7 bar.

Keywords
single-use valve, HTCC, alumina, platinum
National Category
Engineering and Technology Materials Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-298806 (URN)10.1088/0960-1317/26/9/095002 (DOI)000402408400002 ()
Funder
Swedish National Space BoardKnut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation
Available from: 2016-07-08 Created: 2016-07-08 Last updated: 2017-07-11Bibliographically approved
Persson, A., Berglund, M., Khaji, Z., Sturesson, P., Söderberg, J. & Thornell, G. (2016). Optogalvanic spectroscopy with microplasma sources – Current status and development towards lab on a chip. Journal of Micromechanics and Microengineering, 26(10), Article ID 104003.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Optogalvanic spectroscopy with microplasma sources – Current status and development towards lab on a chip
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2016 (English)In: Journal of Micromechanics and Microengineering, ISSN 0960-1317, E-ISSN 1361-6439, Vol. 26, no 10, article id 104003Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Miniaturized optogalvanic spectroscopy (OGS) shows excellent prospects of becoming ahighly sensitive method for gas analysis in micro total analysis systems. Here, a status reporton the current development of microwave induced microplasma sources for OGS is presented,together with the first comparison of the sensitivity of the method to conventional single-passabsorption spectroscopy. The studied microplasma sources are stripline split-ring resonators(SSRRs), with typical ring radii between 3.5 and 6 mm and operation frequencies around2.6 GHz. A linear response (R2 = 0.9999), and a stability of more than 100 s are demonstratedwhen using the microplasma source as an optogalvanic detector. Additionally, saturationeffects at laser powers higher than 100 mW are observed, and the temporal response of theplasma to periodic laser perturbation with repletion rates between 20 Hz and 200 Hz arestudied. Finally, the potential of integrating additional functionality with the detector isdiscussed, with the particular focus on a pressure sensor and a miniaturized combustor toallow for studies of solid samples.

Keywords
Optogalvanic spectroscopy, split-ring resonator, microplasma sources
National Category
Other Electrical Engineering, Electronic Engineering, Information Engineering Atom and Molecular Physics and Optics
Research subject
Engineering Science with specialization in Microsystems Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-284627 (URN)10.1088/0960-1317/26/10/104003 (DOI)000384028900003 ()
Funder
Swedish National Space Board, 104/14
Note

Awaiting publication online. 

Available from: 2016-04-19 Created: 2016-04-19 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
Mege, D., Gurgurewicz, J., Grygorczuk, J., Wiśniewski, L., Beucler, E., Carrère, V., . . . Zubko, N. (2016). Principles and examples of scientific applications of the HOPTER jumping robot on Phobos. In: : . Paper presented at Phobos MMX Workshop.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Principles and examples of scientific applications of the HOPTER jumping robot on Phobos
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2016 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
National Category
Aerospace Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-294423 (URN)
Conference
Phobos MMX Workshop
Available from: 2016-05-20 Created: 2016-05-20 Last updated: 2016-08-02Bibliographically approved
Gurgurewicz, J., Mège, D., Grygorczuk, J., Wiśniewski, Ł., Berglund, M., Carrère, V., . . . Zubko, N. (2016). Studying the composition of Phobos' surface using HOPTER (Highland Terrain Hopper). In: : . Paper presented at Phobos MMX Science Workshop.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Studying the composition of Phobos' surface using HOPTER (Highland Terrain Hopper)
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2016 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
National Category
Aerospace Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-294422 (URN)
Conference
Phobos MMX Science Workshop
Available from: 2016-05-20 Created: 2016-05-20 Last updated: 2016-08-02Bibliographically approved
Mège, D., Gurgurewicz, J., Grygorczuk, J., Wisniewski, L. & Thornell, G. (2016). The Highland Terrain Hopper (HOPTER): Concept and use cases of a new locomotion system for the exploration of low gravity Solar System bodies. Acta Astronautica, 121, 200-220
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Highland Terrain Hopper (HOPTER): Concept and use cases of a new locomotion system for the exploration of low gravity Solar System bodies
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2016 (English)In: Acta Astronautica, ISSN 0094-5765, E-ISSN 1879-2030, Vol. 121, p. 200-220Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Comprehensive understanding of the principles governing the geological activity of the Earth was obtained in continental and oceanic mountains. It is not expected that the principles governing the overall geologic activity and evolution of other planetary bodies such as Mars will be understood if exploration is limited to nearly flat terrains, either imposed by the used exploration platform capabilities, the risk of getting stuck, or by the time required to cross the border of a landing ellipse. Surface exploration of mountains is additionally to be coupled to two- or three-dimensional geophysical surveys to correlate the surface observations with deeper processes. On the small bodies where ultra-low gravity prevails, the weight of wheel-driven platforms is not sufficient to generate the friction at the contact with the ground that is required to trigger motion of the rover relative to the ground. Under such circumstances, hopping is one of the mobility solutions. We present a new locomotion system, the hopter platform, which is adapted to these challenges on Solar System bodies having a gravity field lower than on Earth. The hopter is a robust, versatile and highly manoeuvrable platform based on simple mechanical concepts that accurately jumps to distances of metres to tens of metres and more, depending on the gravity field of the studied body. Its low mass of 10 kg (including up to 3 kg of miniaturised payload), makes it possible to simultaneously launch several hopters to work as a fractionated explorer at a very competitive cost. After reviewing the payload that may be placed onboard hopters, we illustrate the scientific capabilities of hopters and hopter networks in performing basic geologic observations at distinct study sites in a variety of geological environments, obtaining data along steep geological cross sections, surveying geophysical anomalies in the subsurface, prospecting resources, monitoring micro environments, meteorological events, and geodetic deformation, or characterizing dust activity on Mars, the Moon, and Phobos.

Keywords
Planetary locomotion, Planetary geology, Geophysical surveying, Mars, Valles Marineris, Moon
National Category
Fusion, Plasma and Space Physics Astronomy, Astrophysics and Cosmology Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-283753 (URN)10.1016/j.actaastro.2015.12.042 (DOI)000371838300020 ()
Available from: 2016-04-14 Created: 2016-04-14 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
Mege, D., Gurgurewicz, J., Grygorczuk, J., Wisniewski, L. & Thornell, G. (2016). The Highland Terrain Hopper (HOPTER): Concept and usecases of a new locomotion system for the exploration of lowgravity Solar System bodies. Acta Astronautica, 121, 200-220
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Highland Terrain Hopper (HOPTER): Concept and usecases of a new locomotion system for the exploration of lowgravity Solar System bodies
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2016 (English)In: Acta Astronautica, ISSN 0094-5765, E-ISSN 1879-2030, Vol. 121, p. 200-220Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Comprehensive understanding of the principles governing the geological activity of theEarth was obtained in continental and oceanic mountains. It is not expected that theprinciples governing the overall geologic activity and evolution of other planetary bodiessuch as Mars will be understood if exploration is limited to nearlyflat terrains, eitherimposed by the used exploration platform capabilities, the risk of getting stuck, or by thetime required to cross the border of a landing ellipse. Surface exploration of mountains isadditionally to be coupled to two- or three-dimensional geophysical surveys to correlatethe surface observations with deeper processes. On the small bodies where ultra-lowgravity prevails, the weight of wheel-driven platforms is not sufficient to generate thefriction at the contact with the ground that is required to trigger motion of the roverrelative to the ground. Under such circumstances, hopping is one of the mobility solutions.We present a new locomotion system, the hopter platform, which is adapted to thesechallenges on Solar System bodies having a gravityfield lower than on Earth. The hopter isa robust, versatile and highly manoeuvrable platform based on simple mechanical con-cepts that accurately jumps to distances of metres to tens of metres and more, dependingon the gravityfield of the studied body. Its low mass of 10 kg (including up to 3 kg ofminiaturised payload), makes it possible to simultaneously launch several hopters to workas a fractionated explorer at a very competitive cost. After reviewing the payload that maybe placed onboard hopters, we illustrate the scientific capabilities of hopters and hopternetworks in performing basic geologic observations at distinct study sites in a variety ofgeological environments, obtaining data along steep geological cross sections, surveyinggeophysical anomalies in the subsurface, prospecting resources, monitoring micro-environments, meteorological events, and geodetic deformation, or characterizing dustactivity on Mars, the Moon, and Phobos.

Keywords
Planetary locomotion, Planetary geology, Geophysical surveying, Mars, Valles Marineris, Moon
National Category
Aerospace Engineering
Research subject
Engineering Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-274725 (URN)
Available from: 2016-01-25 Created: 2016-01-25 Last updated: 2017-11-30
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-4468-6801

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