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Torell, Erik
Publications (7 of 7) Show all publications
Mölstad, S., Erntell, M., Hanberger, H., Melander, E., Norman, C., Skoog, G., . . . Cars, O. (2008). Sustained reduction of antibiotic use and low bacterial resistance: 10-year follow-up of the Swedish Strama programme. Lancet. Infectious diseases (Print), 8(2), 125-132
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sustained reduction of antibiotic use and low bacterial resistance: 10-year follow-up of the Swedish Strama programme
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2008 (English)In: Lancet. Infectious diseases (Print), ISSN 1473-3099, E-ISSN 1474-4457, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 125-132Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Increasing use of antibiotics and the spread of resistant pneumococcal clones in the early 1990s alarmed the medical profession and medical authorities in Sweden. Strama (Swedish Strategic Programme for the Rational Use of Antimicrobial Agents and Surveillance of Resistance) was therefore started in 1994 to provide surveillance of antibiotic use and resistance, and to implement the rational use of antibiotics and development of new knowledge. Between 1995 and 2004, antibiotic use for outpatients decreased from 15.7 to 12.6 defined daily doses per 1000 inhabitants per day and from 536 to 410 prescriptions per 1000 inhabitants per year. The reduction was most prominent in children aged 5-14 years (52%) and for macrolides (65%). During this period, the number of hospital admissions for acute mastoiditis, rhinosinusitis, and quinsy (peritonsillar abscess) was stable or declining. Although the epidemic spread in southern Sweden of penicillin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae was curbed, the national frequency increased from 4% to 6%. Resistance remained low in most other bacterial species during this period. This multidisciplinary, coordinated programme has contributed to the reduction of antibiotic use without measurable negative consequences. However, antibiotic resistance in several bacterial species is slowly increasing, which has led to calls for continued sustained efforts to preserve the effectiveness of available antibiotics.

National Category
Infectious Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-17573 (URN)10.1016/S1473-3099(08)70017-3 (DOI)000252675300018 ()18222163 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2008-07-10 Created: 2009-02-06 Last updated: 2017-12-08Bibliographically approved
Lytsy, B., Sandegren, L., Tano, E., Torell, E., Andersson, D. I. & Melhus, Å. (2008). The first major extended-spectrum beta-lactamase outbreak in Scandinavia was caused by clonal spread of a multiresistant Klebsiella pneumoniae producing CTX-M-15. Acta Pathologica, Microbiologica et Immunologica Scandinavica (APMIS), 116(4), 302-8
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The first major extended-spectrum beta-lactamase outbreak in Scandinavia was caused by clonal spread of a multiresistant Klebsiella pneumoniae producing CTX-M-15
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2008 (English)In: Acta Pathologica, Microbiologica et Immunologica Scandinavica (APMIS), ISSN 0903-4641, E-ISSN 1600-0463, Vol. 116, no 4, p. 302-8Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Between May and December 2005, 64 multidrug-resistant isolates of Klebsiella pneumoniae were detected from patients admitted to Uppsala University Hospital. This represented a dramatic increase in ESBL-producing K. pneumoniae compared to previous years. To investigate the epidemiology and to characterize the resistance mechanisms of the isolates, a study was initiated. Antibiotic susceptibility was determined by means of the Etest and the disc diffusion method. Extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) production was identified by clavulanic acid synergy test and confirmed with PCR amplification followed by DNA sequencing. DNA profiles of the isolates were examined with pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). All isolates were resistant or exhibited reduced susceptibility to cefadroxil, cefuroxime, cefotaxime, ceftazidime, aztreonam, piperacillin/tazobactam, ciprofloxacin, tobramycin, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. They produced ESBL of the CTX-M-15 type, and the involvement of a single K. pneumoniae clone was shown. This is the first major clonal outbreak of multiresistant ESBL-producing K. pneumoniae in Scandinavia. The outbreak demonstrates the epidemic potential of enterobacteria containing ESBLs of the CTX-M type, even in a country with a relatively low selective pressure and a low prevalence of multiresistant bacteria.

Keywords
Clonal outbreak, Klebsiella pneumoniae, CTX-M-15
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-17461 (URN)10.1111/j.1600-0463.2008.00922.x (DOI)000254665600006 ()18397465 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2008-06-24 Created: 2008-06-24 Last updated: 2017-12-08Bibliographically approved
Torell, E., Molin, D., Tano, E., Ehrenborg, C. & Ryden, C. (2005). Community-acquired pneumonia and bacteraemia in a healthy young woman caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) carrying the genes encoding Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL).. Scand J Infect Dis, 37(11-12), 902-4
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Community-acquired pneumonia and bacteraemia in a healthy young woman caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) carrying the genes encoding Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL).
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2005 (English)In: Scand J Infect Dis, ISSN 0036-5548, Vol. 37, no 11-12, p. 902-4Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Keywords
Adult, Bacteremia/drug therapy/*microbiology, Carrier State/microbiology, Community-Acquired Infections/drug therapy/*microbiology/transmission, DNA; Bacterial/genetics/isolation & purification, Female, Genes; Bacterial, Greece, Humans, Methicillin Resistance, Pneumonia; Bacterial/*microbiology, Staphylococcal Infections/drug therapy/*microbiology/transmission, Staphylococcus aureus/drug effects/*genetics, Sweden
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-79447 (URN)16308227 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2007-01-25 Created: 2007-01-25 Last updated: 2011-01-11
Hambraeus, A., Ransjo, U., Torell, E. & Ahrén, C. (2005). [If good hand hygiene routines are not followed no private rooms in the world will help]. Lakartidningen, 102(48), 3716-7
Open this publication in new window or tab >>[If good hand hygiene routines are not followed no private rooms in the world will help]
2005 (Swedish)In: Lakartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, Vol. 102, no 48, p. 3716-7Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Keywords
Cross Infection/microbiology/prevention & control/*transmission, Handwashing, Humans, Infection Control, Intensive Care Units, Patient Isolation, Staphylococcal Infections/prevention & control/*transmission
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-79487 (URN)16416953 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2007-03-08 Created: 2007-03-08 Last updated: 2011-01-11
Lytsy, B., Cars, O. & Torell, E. (2005). Kinoloner - bot som blivit hot: Accelererande resistensutveckling kräver skärpta indikationer. Läkartidningen, 102(48), 3651-3659
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Kinoloner - bot som blivit hot: Accelererande resistensutveckling kräver skärpta indikationer
2005 (Swedish)In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 102, no 48, p. 3651-3659Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Fluoroquinolones are important antibiotics for treatment of serious infections. Increased usage has, in many countries, resulted in rapid development of resistance towards this class of antibiotics. Moreover, it has been shown that use of fluoroquinolones is associated with selection of multi-resistant bacteria, such as methicillin-resistant S. aureus and vancomycin-resistant enterococci. The risks related to overuse of fluoroquinolones among both humans and animals are reviewed and strict indications for use are suggested.

Keywords
Animals, Drug Resistance; Multiple; Bacterial, Drug Utilization/statistics & numerical data/trends, English Abstract, Europe, Fluoroquinolones/administration & dosage/*adverse effects, Humans, Methicillin Resistance, Practice Guidelines, Vancomycin Resistance
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-76980 (URN)16416945 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2006-06-27 Created: 2006-06-27 Last updated: 2017-12-14Bibliographically approved
Iversen, A., Kuhn, I., Rahman, M., Franklin, A., Burman, L. G., Olsson-Liljequist, B., . . . Möllby, R. (2004). Evidence for transmission between humans and the environment of a nosocomial strain of Enterococcus faecium.. Environ Microbiol, 6(1), 55-9
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Evidence for transmission between humans and the environment of a nosocomial strain of Enterococcus faecium.
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2004 (English)In: Environ Microbiol, ISSN 1462-2912, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 55-9Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

An ampicillin- and ciprofloxacin-resistant Enterococcus faecium (ARE) strain, named FMSE1, with a characteristic biochemical phenotype, was in a recent study found to dominate among faecal ARE isolates from patients in several Swedish hospitals. In the present study, the prevalence of this strain among 9676 enterococcal isolates from healthy children, hospital sewage, urban sewage, surface water, slaughtered animals (broilers, pigs and cattle) and pig faeces and manure was investigated. Enterococcal isolates having the same biochemical phenotype as the FMSE1 were most common in samples of hospital sewage (50%), surface water (35%), treated sewage (28%) and untreated sewage (17%), but rare in samples from healthy children (0.8%) and animals (2%). PFGE typing of FMSE1-like isolates from hospital sewage indicated that they were closely related to the nosocomial FMSE1 strain. Thus, this study indicated a possible transmission route for nosocomial E. faecium from patients in hospitals to hospital sewage and urban sewage, and further via treatment plants to surface water and possibly back to humans. This proposed route of circulation of drug-resistant enterococci might be further amplified by antibiotic usage in human medicine. In contrast, such transmission from food animals seems to play a negligible role in Sweden.

Keywords
Ampicillin Resistance, Animals, Anti-Infective Agents/pharmacology, Bacterial Typing Techniques, Carrier State/microbiology, Cattle, Chickens/microbiology, Ciprofloxacin/pharmacology, Cross Infection/*microbiology, DNA Fingerprinting, Drug Resistance; Bacterial/genetics, Electrophoresis; Gel; Pulsed-Field, Enterococcus faecium/*isolation & purification/*physiology, Feces/microbiology, Fresh Water/microbiology, Genotype, Gram-Positive Bacterial Infections/epidemiology/*microbiology, Human, Phenotype, Sewage/microbiology, Support; Non-U.S. Gov't, Swine/microbiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-67387 (URN)14686941 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2004-11-23 Created: 2004-11-23 Last updated: 2011-01-12
Gustafsson, I., Sjölund, M., Torell, E., Johannesson, M., Engstrand, L., Cars, O. & Andersson, D. I. (2003). Bacteria with increased mutation frequency and antibiotic resistance are enriched in the commensal flora of patients with high antibiotic usage. Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy, 52(4), 645-650
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Bacteria with increased mutation frequency and antibiotic resistance are enriched in the commensal flora of patients with high antibiotic usage
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2003 (English)In: Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy, ISSN 0305-7453, E-ISSN 1460-2091, Vol. 52, no 4, p. 645-650Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: We examined how prolonged antibiotic treatment affected the resistance and mutation frequency of human microflora isolated from intestine (Escherichia coli, enterococci spp.), pharynx (alpha-streptococci) and nostril (coagulase-negative staphylococci, CoNS).

METHODS: Samples were collected from patients at the Center of Cystic Fibrosis (n=18) and the haematology ward (n=18) of the University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden. The individually used amount of antibiotics for 1 year was recorded as the defined daily dose (DDD). Primary health care patients (n=30), with no antibiotic treatment for 1 year before sampling, were used as controls. Three isolates of each bacterium from each patient were examined. Antibiotic susceptibilities were determined by disc diffusion. Mutation frequencies to rifampicin resistance were measured on 30 independent cultures of each bacterial species from each individual by plating on rifampicin agar plates. For alpha-streptococci the mutation frequency to streptomycin resistance was also determined.

RESULTS: Isolates from patients with high antibiotic use showed a pronounced shift towards increased resistance and a small but significant increase in the mutation frequency compared with isolates from the controls. For E. coli, enterococci and CoNS the increase in geometric mean mutation frequency in the patient group was 3-, 1.8- and 1.5-fold, respectively (P values 0.0001, 0.016 and 0.012). For alpha-streptococci there was a significant difference in geometric mean mutation frequency between patient and control groups for streptomycin resistance (P=0.024) but not for rifampicin resistance (P=0.74).

CONCLUSIONS: High antibiotic use selected for commensals with highly increased resistance and a slight increase in mutation frequency.

National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-92063 (URN)10.1093/jac/dkg427 (DOI)12972454 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2004-09-15 Created: 2004-09-15 Last updated: 2017-12-14Bibliographically approved
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