uu.seUppsala University Publications
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Söderhäll, Kenneth
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 150) Show all publications
Sirikharin, R., Söderhäll, I. & Söderhäll, K. (2018). Characterization of a cold-active transglutaminase from a crayfish, Pacifastacus leniusculus. Fish and Shellfish Immunology, 80, 546-549
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Characterization of a cold-active transglutaminase from a crayfish, Pacifastacus leniusculus
2018 (English)In: Fish and Shellfish Immunology, ISSN 1050-4648, E-ISSN 1095-9947, Vol. 80, p. 546-549Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Transglutaminase (TGase) from signal crayfish (Pacifastacus leniusculus) and its activity at low temperatures was studied. TGase is an abundant protein in the hematopoietic (HPT) cells and this tissue was used for TGase enzyme preparation. The optimal temperature and pH for the activity of crayfish TGase were determined. We found that TGase activity at 4 degrees C showed nearly the same activity as at a temperature of 22 degrees C. TGase activity from crayfish was compared with guinea pig liver TGase activity at 4 degrees C and the crayfish TGase displayed a higher activity while guinea pig liver TGase had a very low activity at this low temperature. By comparing kinetic parameters to guinea pig liver TGase, the results showed that a high activity of crayfish TGase was due to a decreasing K-m value for pentylamine as a substrate, while it did not affect the k(cat) value (at 22 degrees C). The amino acid sequences of a krill and a crayfish TGase, which both are cold adapted, do not give any clue to why these two enzymes are cold-adapted. These results demonstrate that crayfish TGase is adapted to have significant activity at low temperatures and since crayfish are living in quite cold waters this is an interesting adaptation of this enzyme.

Keywords
Cold-adapted enzyme, Crayfish, Transglutaminase
National Category
Immunology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-363096 (URN)10.1016/j.fsi.2018.06.042 (DOI)000440958100061 ()29960064 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, VR 621-2012-2418Swedish Research Council Formas, FORMAS 2011-606
Available from: 2018-10-16 Created: 2018-10-16 Last updated: 2018-10-16Bibliographically approved
Junkunlo, K., Söderhäll, K. & Söderhäll, I. (2018). Clotting protein: An extracellular matrix (ECM) protein involved in crustacean hematopoiesis. Developmental and Comparative Immunology, 78, 132-140
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Clotting protein: An extracellular matrix (ECM) protein involved in crustacean hematopoiesis
2018 (English)In: Developmental and Comparative Immunology, ISSN 0145-305X, E-ISSN 1879-0089, Vol. 78, p. 132-140Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Hematopoietic progenitor cells in crustaceans are organized in lobule-like structures surrounded by different types of cells and extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins in a Hematopoietic tissue (HPT). Here we show that the clotting protein (CP) is part of the ECM in HPT and is secreted during HPT cell culture. The formation of a filamentous network of CP was observed in HPT cell culture. A high amount of CP protein was detected at the surfaces of undifferentiated cells (round-shaped) compared with migrating cells (spindle shaped). Co-localization of the CP protein and TGase activity was observed on the cell surface and filamentous network between cells. A role for CP together with collagen was revealed in a 3D culture in which a collagen-I matrix was immobilized with CP or supplemented with CP. The results showed possible functions of CP, collagen, TGase and the cytokine Ast1 in the regulation of HPT progenitor cell behavior. This is the first study to provide insight into the role of CP, which probably not only participates in clot formation but also functions as an ECM component protein controlling hematopoietic stem cell behavior.

Keywords
Clotting protein, ECM, Hematopoiesis, Crustacean
National Category
Zoology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-340667 (URN)10.1016/j.dci.2017.09.017 (DOI)000413881000014 ()28943319 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 621-2012-2416
Available from: 2018-02-05 Created: 2018-02-05 Last updated: 2018-02-05Bibliographically approved
Cerenius, L. & Söderhäll, K. (2018). Crayfish immunity: Recent findings. Developmental and Comparative Immunology, 80, 94-98
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Crayfish immunity: Recent findings
2018 (English)In: Developmental and Comparative Immunology, ISSN 0145-305X, E-ISSN 1879-0089, Vol. 80, p. 94-98Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Freshwater crayfish is an important commodity as well as a successful model for studies on crustacean immunity. Due to the ease with which they are kept and the available methods for hemocyte separation and culture they have proven to be very useful. Here, recent progress regarding pattern recognition, immune effector production and antiviral mechanisms are discussed. Several cases of functional resemblance between vertebrate complement and the crayfish immune reactions are highlighted.

Keywords
Lectin, Pattern recognition, Prophenoloxidase, White spot syndrome virus, Antimicrobial peptide, Complement system
National Category
Physiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-343652 (URN)10.1016/j.dci.2017.05.010 (DOI)000423002100010 ()28502650 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-05-09 Created: 2018-05-09 Last updated: 2018-05-09Bibliographically approved
Korkut, G. G., Söderhäll, I., Söderhäll, K. & Noonin, C. (2018). The effect of temperature on bacteria-host interactions in the freshwater crayfish, Pacifastacus leniusculus. Journal of Invertebrate Pathology, 157, 67-73
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The effect of temperature on bacteria-host interactions in the freshwater crayfish, Pacifastacus leniusculus
2018 (English)In: Journal of Invertebrate Pathology, ISSN 0022-2011, E-ISSN 1096-0805, Vol. 157, p. 67-73Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Water temperature is known to affect many aspects of aquatic life including immune responses and susceptibility to diseases. In this context, we studied the effect of temperature on the defense system of the freshwater crayfish Pacifastacus leniusculus. Animals were challenged with two pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria, Aeromonas hydrophila and Pseudomonas gessardii, as well as the bacterial cell wall component lipopolysaccharide (LPS) at two different temperatures, cold (6 °C) and room temperature (22 °C). The immune responses were compared by means of differences in mortality, phagocytosis, bacterial clearance, and the melanization reaction of the hemolymph at these two temperatures. We observed that crayfish survival was higher at cold temperature. The mortality rate was zero at 6 °C following A. hydrophila or LPS injections. Furthermore, the bacteria were completely cleared from crayfish after they had been held at 6 °C for more than 9 days. We also observed a strong melanization reaction of hemolymph at 22 °C when stimulated with LPS, as well as with bacteria. Taken together, our results suggest that the cellular immunity is more effective at low temperature in this cold-adapted animal and pathogens are efficiently removed from the body by mean of phagocytosis.

Keywords
Aeromonas hydrophila, Pseudomonas gessardii, Temperature, Innate immunity, Melanization, Invertebrate
National Category
Immunology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-366280 (URN)10.1016/j.jip.2018.08.001 (DOI)000444783000009 ()30077692 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas, 2011-606Swedish Research Council, 621-2012-2418
Available from: 2018-11-26 Created: 2018-11-26 Last updated: 2018-11-26Bibliographically approved
Korkut, G. G., Noonin, C. & Söderhäll, K. (2018). The effect of temperature on White Spot Disease progression in a crustacean, Pacifastacus leniusculus. Developmental and Comparative Immunology, 89, 7-13
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The effect of temperature on White Spot Disease progression in a crustacean, Pacifastacus leniusculus
2018 (English)In: Developmental and Comparative Immunology, ISSN 0145-305X, E-ISSN 1879-0089, Vol. 89, p. 7-13Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The effects of temperature on the progression of White Spot Disease (WSD) have been studied in the freshwater crayfish Pacifastacus leniusculus. In this study, we aimed to understand the reason for previously observed low mortalities with white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) infected crayfish at low temperatures. The susceptibility of freshwater crayfish to WSSV was studied at different temperatures. The mortality rate at 6°C was zero, meanwhile the animals kept at 22°C developed WSD symptoms and died in a few days after WSSV injections, however upon transfer of animals from 6°C to 22°C the mortality reached 100% indicating that the virus is not cleared. Moreover, the VP28 expression at 6°C was significantly lower compared to animals kept at 22°C. We injected animals with demecolcine, an inhibitor that arrests the cell cycle in metaphase, and observed a delayed mortality. Furthermore, the VP28 expression was found to be lower in these animals receiving both injections with WSSV and demecolcine since cell proliferation was inhibited by demecolcine. We quantified WSSV copy numbers and found that virus entry was blocked at 6°C, but not in demecolcine treatments. We supported this result by quantifying the expression of a clip domain serine protease (PlcSP) which plays an important role for WSSV binding, and we found that the PlcSP expression was inhibited at 6°C. Therefore, our hypothesis is that the WSSV needs proliferating cells to replicate, and an optimum temperature to enter the host hematopoietic stem cells successfully. 

Keywords
White spot syndrome virus, temperature, innate immunity, crustacean, serine protease
National Category
Biological Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-356485 (URN)10.1016/j.dci.2018.07.026 (DOI)
Available from: 2018-07-31 Created: 2018-07-31 Last updated: 2018-11-27Bibliographically approved
Shi, H., Ruan, L., Söderhäll, I., Söderhäll, K. & Xu, X. (2018). Transfection of crayfish hematopoietic tissue cells. Developmental and Comparative Immunology, 88, 70-76
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Transfection of crayfish hematopoietic tissue cells
Show others...
2018 (English)In: Developmental and Comparative Immunology, ISSN 0145-305X, E-ISSN 1879-0089, Vol. 88, p. 70-76Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Transfection is a powerful tool useful for studying gene function. Establishing transfection methods that enable highly efficient DNA uptake has become increasingly important. The crayfish hematopoietic tissue (Hpt) cell cultures have been proven to be suitable for studies on immunity and cell differentiation in crustaceans including shrimps, but no efficient gene transfer and expression method is available for these cells. Here we report a novel and highly efficient DNA transfection system based on electroporation. This method depends on a recombinant plasmid with the promoter from white spot syndrome virus immediate-early gene wsv249. This plasmid could be introduced into primary cells and efficiently express foreign genes by electroporation. By optimizing different electroporation parameters, more than 30% transfection efficiency could be achieved with the relative viability of cells around 50%. This is the first report of gene introduction to crayfish Hpt cells and will be useful for the expanding our research on crustacean immunity.

Keywords
Transfection, Electroporation, EGFP reporter gene expression, WSSV IE gene promoter, Crayfish hematopoietic tissue cells
National Category
Immunology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-364121 (URN)10.1016/j.dci.2018.07.005 (DOI)000443668600009 ()30003890 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, VR 621-2012-2418Swedish Research Council Formas, 2011-606
Available from: 2018-10-29 Created: 2018-10-29 Last updated: 2018-10-29Bibliographically approved
Guo, E., Korkut, G. G., Jaree, P., Söderhäll, I. & Söderhäll, K. (2017). A Pacifastacus leniusculus serine protease interacts with WSSV. Fish and Shellfish Immunology, 68, 211-219
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Pacifastacus leniusculus serine protease interacts with WSSV
Show others...
2017 (English)In: Fish and Shellfish Immunology, ISSN 1050-4648, E-ISSN 1095-9947, Vol. 68, p. 211-219Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Serine proteases are involved in many critical physiological processes including virus spread and replication. In the present study, we identified a new clip-domain serine protease (PIcSP) in the crayfish Pacifastacus leniusculus hemocytes, which can interact with the White Spot Syndrome Virus (WSSV) envelope protein VP28. It was characterized by a classic clip domain with six strictly conserved Cys residues, and contained the conserved His-Asp-Ser (H-D-S)motif in the catalytic domain. Furthermore, signal peptide prediction revealed that it has a 16-residue secretion signal peptide. Tissue distribution showed that it was mainly located in P. leniusculus hemocytes, and its expression was increased in hemocytes upon WSSV challenge. In vitro knock down of PIcSP decreased both the expression of VP28 and the WSSV copy number in hematopoietic stem (HPT) cells. Accordingly, these data suggest that the new serine protease may be of importance for WSSV infection into hematopoietic cells.

Keywords
Hematopoietic tissue, Invertebrate, Serine protease, Virus, WSSV
National Category
Immunology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-335858 (URN)10.1016/j.fsi.2017.07.026 (DOI)000411299500022 ()28705723 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 621-2012-2418
Available from: 2018-01-24 Created: 2018-01-24 Last updated: 2018-06-26Bibliographically approved
Junkunlo, K., Söderhäll, K., Noonin, C. & Söderhäll, I. (2017). PDGF/VEGF-related receptor affects transglutaminase activity to control cell migration during crustacean hematopoiesis. Stem Cells and Development, 26(20), 1449-1459
Open this publication in new window or tab >>PDGF/VEGF-related receptor affects transglutaminase activity to control cell migration during crustacean hematopoiesis
2017 (English)In: Stem Cells and Development, ISSN 1547-3287, E-ISSN 1557-8534, Vol. 26, no 20, p. 1449-1459Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) receptor, a tyrosine kinase (TK) receptor whose ligand is PDGF, is crucial in the transduction of extracellular signals into cells and mediates numerous processes, such as cell proliferation, differentiation, survival, and migration. We demonstrate the important roles of a receptor TK related to the PDGF/VEGF family protein (PVR) in controlling hematopoietic progenitor cell migration by affecting extracellular transglutaminase (TGase) activity. Pl_PVR1, GenBank accession No. KY444650, is highly expressed in hemocytes and the hematopoietic tissue (HPT). Sunitinib malate was used to block the PVF/PVR downstream pathway in HPT cell culture. The addition of Sunitinib also caused the HPT cells to increase in size and begin spreading. An increase in extracellular TGase activity on the HPT cell membrane was observed in a dose-dependent manner after treatment with Sunitinib malate. The presence of crude Ast1 provided a combinatorial beneficial effect that enhanced the number of spreading cells after inhibition of the Pl_PVR downstream signaling cascade. In addition, an increased immunoreactivity for beta-tubulin and elongation of beta-tubulin filaments were found in Pl_PVR signaling-inhibited cells. The potential roles of PVF/PVR signaling in controlling progenitor cell activity during hematopoiesis in crayfish were investigated and discussed.

Keywords
PDGF/VEGF, hematopoiesis, Transglutaminase, Ast1, crayfish
National Category
Developmental Biology Cell Biology Immunology
Research subject
Biology with specialization in Molecular Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-327243 (URN)10.1089/scd.2017.0086 (DOI)000412919700001 ()28805145 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, VR 2011-4797, VR 621-2012-2418
Available from: 2017-08-07 Created: 2017-08-07 Last updated: 2018-01-03Bibliographically approved
Sirikharin, R., Junkunlo, K., Söderhäll, K. & Söderhäll, I. (2017). Role of astakine1 in regulating transglutaminase activity. Developmental and Comparative Immunology, 76, 77-82
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Role of astakine1 in regulating transglutaminase activity
2017 (English)In: Developmental and Comparative Immunology, ISSN 0145-305X, E-ISSN 1879-0089, Vol. 76, p. 77-82Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Transglutaminase (TGase) has been implicated in maintaining the undifferentiated stage of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) in the crayfish Pacifastacus leniusculus. TGase activity has been reported to be regulated by astakine1, an essential crayfish cytokine for inducing new hemocyte synthesis in hematopoietic tissue (HPT). Here, the role of astakine1 in TGase activity regulation and clotting protein (CP) cross-linking was characterized. A reduction in TGase activity was observed by the addition of purified astakine1 in vitro for both endogenous crayfish TGase and a commercial purified guinea pig liver TGase. As a result, we observed that astakine1 inhibits TGase enzyme activity and acts as a non-competitive inhibitor for the TGase enzyme. Additionally, the clotting reaction was impaired in the presence of astakine1. A decrease in TGase-mediated crosslinking of ε(γ-glutamyl)-lysine bonds was also observed in the presence of astakine1. In conclusion, this study shows that astakine1 acts as an inhibitor of TGase activity and that it also affects CP cross-linking during crayfish hematopoiesis.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2017
Keywords
Astakine1, Clotting protein, Hematopoiesis, Transglutaminase activity
National Category
Developmental Biology Immunology Zoology
Research subject
Biology with specialization in Comparative Physiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-327217 (URN)10.1016/j.dci.2017.05.015 (DOI)000407985100009 ()28528959 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, VR 621-2012-2418
Available from: 2017-08-07 Created: 2017-08-07 Last updated: 2017-10-09Bibliographically approved
Apitanyasai, K., Noonin, C., Tassanakajon, A., Söderhäll, I. & Söderhäll, K. (2016). Characterization of a hemocyte homeostasis-associated-like protein (HHAP) in the freshwater crayfish Pacifastacus leniusculus. Fish and Shellfish Immunology, 58, 429-435
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Characterization of a hemocyte homeostasis-associated-like protein (HHAP) in the freshwater crayfish Pacifastacus leniusculus
Show others...
2016 (English)In: Fish and Shellfish Immunology, ISSN 1050-4648, E-ISSN 1095-9947, Vol. 58, p. 429-435Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Hemocyte homeostasis-associated-like protein (HHAP) in the freshwater crayfish Pacifastacus leniusculus has a distinct role from that of its homolog PmHHAP in the shrimp Penaeus monodon. Knockdown of PIHHAP in vitro using double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) had no effect on the cell morphology of hematopoietic tissue (HPT) cells. The total hemocyte number and caspase activity were unchanged after PIHHAP knockdown in vivo, in contrast to the results found in shrimp. Moreover, suppression of PIHHAP both in vitro and in vivo did not change the mRNA levels of some genes involved in hematopoiesis and hemocyte homeostasis. Interestingly, bacterial count and scanning electron microscope revealed that depletion of PIHHAP in intestine by RNAi resulted in higher number of bacteria in the crayfish intestine. Together, these results suggest that PIHHAP is not involved in hemocyte homeostasis in the crayfish P. leniusculus but appears to affect the bacterial number in the intestine through an unknown mechanism. Since PIHHAP has different functions from PmHHAP, we therefore named it HHAP-like protein.

Keywords
Pacifastacus leniusculus, Hemocyte homeostasis, RNA interference, Intestine, Aeromonas hydrophila
National Category
Immunology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-309995 (URN)10.1016/j.fsi.2016.09.038 (DOI)000387523100051 ()27663854 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2012-2418
Available from: 2016-12-12 Created: 2016-12-09 Last updated: 2017-11-29Bibliographically approved
Organisations

Search in DiVA

Show all publications