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Cerenius, Lage
Publications (10 of 48) Show all publications
Cerenius, L. & Söderhäll, K. (2018). Crayfish immunity: Recent findings. Developmental and Comparative Immunology, 80, 94-98
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Crayfish immunity: Recent findings
2018 (English)In: Developmental and Comparative Immunology, ISSN 0145-305X, E-ISSN 1879-0089, Vol. 80, p. 94-98Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Freshwater crayfish is an important commodity as well as a successful model for studies on crustacean immunity. Due to the ease with which they are kept and the available methods for hemocyte separation and culture they have proven to be very useful. Here, recent progress regarding pattern recognition, immune effector production and antiviral mechanisms are discussed. Several cases of functional resemblance between vertebrate complement and the crayfish immune reactions are highlighted.

Keywords
Lectin, Pattern recognition, Prophenoloxidase, White spot syndrome virus, Antimicrobial peptide, Complement system
National Category
Physiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-343652 (URN)10.1016/j.dci.2017.05.010 (DOI)000423002100010 ()28502650 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-05-09 Created: 2018-05-09 Last updated: 2018-05-09Bibliographically approved
Cerenius, L. & Söderhäll, K. (2013). Commentary: variable immune molecules in invertebrates. Journal of Experimental Biology, 216(23), 4313-4319
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Commentary: variable immune molecules in invertebrates
2013 (English)In: Journal of Experimental Biology, ISSN 0022-0949, E-ISSN 1477-9145, Vol. 216, no 23, p. 4313-4319Article in journal, Editorial material (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

Recently it has become evident that invertebrates may mount a highly variable immune response that is dependent on which pathogen is involved. The molecular mechanisms behind this diversity are beginning to be unravelled and in several invertebrate taxa immune proteins exhibiting a broad range of diversity have been found. In some cases, evidence has been gathered suggesting that this molecular diversity translates into the ability of an affected invertebrate to mount a defence that is specifically aimed at a particular pathogen.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Company of Biologists Ltd: , 2013
Keywords
Dscam; FREP; Innate immunity; Invertebrate immunity; Recognition
National Category
Natural Sciences
Research subject
Biology with specialization in Comparative Physiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-213781 (URN)10.1242/jeb.085191 (DOI)000327495900010 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council
Available from: 2014-01-03 Created: 2014-01-03 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Cerenius, L. & Söderhäll, K. (2012). Crustacean immune responses and their implications for disease control. In: Austin, B. (Ed.), Infectious disease in aquaculture: prevention and control (pp. 69-87). Cambridge: Woodhead Publishing Limited
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Crustacean immune responses and their implications for disease control
2012 (English)In: Infectious disease in aquaculture: prevention and control / [ed] Austin, B., Cambridge: Woodhead Publishing Limited, 2012, p. 69-87Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This chapter reviews recent advances in our knowledge of crustacean immunity. Emphasis is given to shrimp due to their importance in aquaculture and trade and to freshwater crayfish since they serve as model organisms for research in crustacean immunology. Crustaceans lack antibodies, interferon and some other components from the mammalian immune arsenal but can still mount an efficient defence against many potential pathogens. Crustacean innate immunity relies on a combination of efficient hemocyte and humoral reactions carried out by plasma proteins.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cambridge: Woodhead Publishing Limited, 2012
Series
Woodhead Publishing in Food Science Technology and Nutrition, ISSN 2042-8049 ; 231
Keywords
infectious disease, prophenoloxidase, hemocyte
National Category
Natural Sciences
Research subject
Biology with specialization in Comparative Physiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-190010 (URN)978-0-85709-016-4 (ISBN)978-0-85709-573-2 (ISBN)
Available from: 2013-01-07 Created: 2013-01-07 Last updated: 2013-01-08Bibliographically approved
Cerenius, L. & Söderhäll, K. (2011). Coagulation in invertebrates. Journal of Innate Immunity, 3(1), 3-8
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Coagulation in invertebrates
2011 (English)In: Journal of Innate Immunity, ISSN 1662-811X, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 3-8Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In most animals there is a need to quickly prevent the loss of blood or equivalent fluids through inflicted injuries. In invertebrates with an open circulatory system (and sometimes a hydroskeleton as well) these losses may otherwise soon be fatal. Also, there is a need to prevent microbes that have gained access to the body through the wound from disseminating throughout the open circulatory system. Therefore, many invertebrates possess a coagulation system to prevent such accidents from having too serious consequences. In this review we discuss recent developments in a few animals - mainly arthropods - where more detailed data are available. It is likely, however, that corresponding systems are present in most phyla, but this is still unchartered territory.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Basel: S. Karger AG, 2011
Keywords
Coagulation, Comparative immunology, Immune response, Insects, Invertebrates, Wound healing
National Category
Immunology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-141521 (URN)10.1159/000322066 (DOI)000285568700002 ()21051883 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2011-01-12 Created: 2011-01-12 Last updated: 2016-05-15
Cerenius, L., Haipeng, L., Zhang, Y., Rimphanitchayakit, V., Tassanakajon, A., Andersson, M. G., . . . Söderhäll, I. (2010). High sequence variability among hemocyte-specific Kazal-type proteinase inhibitors in decapod crustaceans. Developmental and Comparative Immunology, 34(1), 69-75
Open this publication in new window or tab >>High sequence variability among hemocyte-specific Kazal-type proteinase inhibitors in decapod crustaceans
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2010 (English)In: Developmental and Comparative Immunology, ISSN 0145-305X, E-ISSN 1879-0089, Vol. 34, no 1, p. 69-75Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Crustacean hemocytes were found to produce a large number of transcripts coding for Kazal-type proteinase inhibitors (KPIs). A detailed study performed with the crayfish Pacifastacus leniusculus and the shrimp Penaeus monodon revealed the presence of at least 26 and 20 different Kazal domains from the hemocyte KPIs, respectively. Comparisons with KPIs from other taxa indicate that the sequences of these domains evolve rapidly. A few conserved positions, e.g. six invariant cysteines were present in all domain sequences whereas the position of P1 amino acid, a determinant for substrate specificity, varied highly. A study with a single crayfish animal suggested that even at the individual level considerable sequence variability among hemocyte KPIs produced exist. Expression analysis of four crayfish KPI transcripts in hematopoietic tissue cells and different hemocyte types suggest that some of these KPIs are likely to be involved in hematopoiesis or hemocyte release as they were produced in particular hemocyte types or maturation stages only.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2010
Keywords
Innate immunity, Host–parasite interactions, Hematopoiesis, Crayfish, Shrimp, Kazal inhibitor, Serine proteinase inhibitor, WSSV
National Category
Biological Sciences
Research subject
Immunology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-109100 (URN)10.1016/j.dci.2009.08.005 (DOI)000272088500008 ()
Available from: 2009-10-09 Created: 2009-10-09 Last updated: 2017-12-13
Cerenius, L., Babu, R., Söderhäll, K. & Jiravanichpaisal, P. (2010). In vitro effects on bacterial growth of phenoloxidase reaction products. Journal of Invertebrate Pathology, 103(1), 21-23
Open this publication in new window or tab >>In vitro effects on bacterial growth of phenoloxidase reaction products
2010 (English)In: Journal of Invertebrate Pathology, ISSN 0022-2011, E-ISSN 1096-0805, Vol. 103, no 1, p. 21-23Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

An active phenoloxidase preparation from the freshwater crayfish Pacifastacus leniusculus exhibited a strong antibacterial effect in vitro on the bacteria Aeromonas hydrophila, Escherichia coli, Streptococcus pneumoniae whereas a weaker but still significant effect against Bacillus cereus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus. In most cases reduction of bacterial growth was stronger when dopamine was used as substrate as compared to L-dopa. The effect on bacteria was abolished if no substrate was available for the phenoloxidase or in the presence of the phenoloxidase inhibitor phenylthiourea.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2010
Keywords
innate immunity, prophenoloxidase, bacterial growth inhibition
National Category
Immunology
Research subject
Immunology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-109087 (URN)10.1016/j.jip.2009.09.006 (DOI)000273993000003 ()
Available from: 2009-10-09 Created: 2009-10-09 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved
Donpudsa, S., Söderhäll, I., Rimphanitchayakit, V., Cerenius, L., Tassanakajon, A. & Söderhäll, K. (2010). Proteinase inhibitory activities of two two-domain Kazal proteinase inhibitors from the freshwater crayfish Pacifastacus leniusculus and the importance of the P2 position in proteinase inhibitory activity. Fish and Shellfish Immunology, 29(5), 716-723
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Proteinase inhibitory activities of two two-domain Kazal proteinase inhibitors from the freshwater crayfish Pacifastacus leniusculus and the importance of the P2 position in proteinase inhibitory activity
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2010 (English)In: Fish and Shellfish Immunology, ISSN 1050-4648, E-ISSN 1095-9947, Vol. 29, no 5, p. 716-723Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Serine proteinase inhibitors are found ubiquitously in living organisms and involved in homeostasis of processes using proteinases as well as innate immune defense. Two two-domain Kazal-type serine proteinase inhibitors (KPIs), KPI2 and KPI8, have been identified from the hemocyte cDNA library of the crayfish Pacifastacus leniusculus. Unlike other KPIs from P. leniusculus, they are found specific to the hernocytes and contain an uncommon P-2 amino acid residue, Gly. To unveil their inhibitory activities, the two KPIs and their domains were over-expressed. By testing against subtilisin, trypsin, chymotrypsin and elastase, the KPI2 was found to inhibit strongly against subtilisin and weakly against trypsin, while the KPI8 was strongly active against only trypsin. With their P-1 Set and Lys residues, the KPI2_domain2 and KPI8_domain2 were responsible for strong inhibition against subtilisin and trypsin, respectively. Mutagenesis of KPI8_domain1 at P-2 amino acid residue from Gly to Pro, mimicking the P-2 residue of KPI8_domain2, rendered the KPI8_domain1 strongly active against trypsin, indicating the important role of P-2 residue in inhibitory activities of the Kazal-type serine proteinase inhibitors. Only the KPI2 was found to inhibit against the extracellular serine proteinases from the pathogenic oomycete of the freshwater crayfish, Aphanomyces astaci.

Keywords
Kazal proteinase inhibitor, Crustaceans, Innate immunity, Hemocytes
National Category
Biological Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-134538 (URN)10.1016/j.fsi.2010.07.001 (DOI)000282470400002 ()
Available from: 2010-11-30 Created: 2010-11-29 Last updated: 2017-12-12
Cerenius, L., Kawabata, S.-i., Lee, B. L., Nonaka, M. & Söderhäll, K. (2010). Proteolytic cascades and their involvement in invertebrate immunity. TIBS -Trends in Biochemical Sciences. Regular ed., 35(10), 575-583
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Proteolytic cascades and their involvement in invertebrate immunity
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2010 (English)In: TIBS -Trends in Biochemical Sciences. Regular ed., ISSN 0968-0004, E-ISSN 1362-4326, Vol. 35, no 10, p. 575-583Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Bacteria and other potential pathogens are cleared rapidly from the body fluids of invertebrates by the immediate response of the innate immune system. Proteolytic cascades, following their initiation by pattern recognition proteins, control several such reactions, notably coagulation, melanisation, activation of the Toll receptor and complement-like reactions. However, there is considerable variation among invertebrates and these cascades, although widespread, are not present in all phyla. In recent years, significant progress has been made in identifying and characterizing these cascades in insects. Notably, recent work has identified several connections and shared principles among the different pathways, suggesting that cross-talk between them may be common.

Keywords
complement evolution, prophenoloxidase, coagulation, toll receptor
National Category
Immunology
Research subject
Biology with specialization in Comparative Physiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-141588 (URN)10.1016/j.tibs.2010.04.006 (DOI)000283411100006 ()20541942 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2011-01-12 Created: 2011-01-12 Last updated: 2017-12-11
Cerenius, L., Andersson, M. G. & Söderhäll, K. (2009). Aphanomyces astaci and crustaceans.. In: Kurt Lamour and Sophien Kamoun (Ed.), Oomycete Genetics and Genomics.: Diversity, Interactions, and Research Tools. (pp. 425-433). Hoboken, New Jersey: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Aphanomyces astaci and crustaceans.
2009 (English)In: Oomycete Genetics and Genomics.: Diversity, Interactions, and Research Tools. / [ed] Kurt Lamour and Sophien Kamoun, Hoboken, New Jersey: John Wiley & Sons, Inc. , 2009, p. 425-433Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Hoboken, New Jersey: John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 2009
National Category
Microbiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-141562 (URN)978-0-47025567-4 (ISBN)
Available from: 2011-01-12 Created: 2011-01-12 Last updated: 2016-05-15
Diéguez-Uribeondo, J., García, M. A., Cerenius, L., Kozubíková, E., Ballesteros, I., Windels, C., . . . Martín, M. P. (2009). Phylogenetic relationships among plant and animal parasites, and saprotrophs in Aphanomyces (Oomycetes). Fungal Genetics and Biology, 46(5), 365-376
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Phylogenetic relationships among plant and animal parasites, and saprotrophs in Aphanomyces (Oomycetes)
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2009 (English)In: Fungal Genetics and Biology, ISSN 1087-1845, E-ISSN 1096-0937, Vol. 46, no 5, p. 365-376Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Molecular phylogenetic relationships among 12 species of Aphanomyces de Bary (Oomycetes) were analyzed based on 108 ITS sequences of nuclear rDNA. Sequences used in the analyses belonged to the major species currently available in pure culture and GenBank. Bayesian, maximum likelihood, and maximum parsimony analyses support that Aphanomyces constitutes a monophyletic group. Three independent lineages were found: (i) plant parasitic, (ii) animal parasitic, and (iii) saprotrophic or opportunistic parasitic. Sexual reproduction appeared to be critical in plant parasites for survival in soil environments while asexual reproduction seemed to be advantageous for exploiting specialization in animal parasitism. Repeated zoospore emergence seems to be an advantageous property for both plant and animal parasitic modes of life. Growth in unspecific media was generally faster in saprotrophs compared with parasitic species. A number of strains and GenBank sequences were found to be misidentified. It was confirmed molecularly that Aphanomyces piscicida and Aphanomyces invadans appear to be conspecific, and found that Aphanomyces iridis and Aphanomyces euteiches are closely related, if not the same, species. This study has shown a clear evolutionary separation between Aphanomyces species that are plant parasites and those that parasitize animals. Saprotrophic or opportunistic species formed a separate evolutionary lineage except Aphanomyces stellatus whose evolutionary position has not yet been resolved.

Keywords
Oomycetes, Evolution, Zoospore, Parasites, Pathogens, ITS-rDNA
National Category
Biological Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-114212 (URN)10.1016/j.fgb.2009.02.004 (DOI)000265470200002 ()19236935 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2010-02-11 Created: 2010-02-11 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved
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