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Ödeen, Anders
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Publications (10 of 35) Show all publications
Harris, R. B., Alström, P., Ödeen, A. & Leache, A. D. (2018). Discordance between genomic divergence and phenotypic variation in a rapidly evolving avian genus (Motacilla). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, 120, 183-195
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Discordance between genomic divergence and phenotypic variation in a rapidly evolving avian genus (Motacilla)
2018 (English)In: Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, ISSN 1055-7903, E-ISSN 1095-9513, Vol. 120, p. 183-195Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Generally, genotypes and phenotypes are expected to be spatially congruent; however, in widespread species complexes with few barriers to dispersal, multiple contact zones, and limited reproductive isolation, discordance between phenotypes and phylogeographic groups is more probable. Wagtails (Motacilla) are a genus of birds with striking plumage pattern variation across the Old World. Up to 13 subspecies are recognized within a single species, yet previous studies using mitochondrial DNA have supported polyphyletic phylogeographic groups that are inconsistent with subspecies plumage characteristics. In this study, we investigate the link between phenotypes and genotype by taking a phylogenetic approach. We use genome-wide SNPs, nuclear introns, and mitochondrial DNA to estimate population structure, isolation by distance, and species relationships. Together, our genetic sampling includes complete species-level sampling and comprehensive coverage of the three most phenotypically diverse Palearctic species. Our study provides strong evidence for species-level patterns of differentiation, however population-level differentiation is less pronounced. SNPs provide a robust estimate of species-level relationships, which are mostly corroborated by a combined analysis of mtDNA and nuclear introns (the first time-calibrated species tree for the genus). However, the mtDNA tree is strongly incongruent and is considered to misrepresent the species phylogeny. The extant wagtail lineages originated during the Pliocene and the Eurasian lineage underwent rapid diversification during the Pleistocene. Three of four widespread Eurasian species exhibit an east-west divide that contradicts both subspecies taxonomy and phenotypic variation. Indeed, SNPs fail to distinguish between phenotypically distinct subspecies within the M. alba and M. flava complexes, and instead support geographical regions, each of which is home to two or more different looking subspecies. This is a major step towards our understanding of wagtail phylogeny compared to previous analyses of fewer species and considerably less sequence data.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ACADEMIC PRESS INC ELSEVIER SCIENCE, 2018
Keywords
Phylogenetics, Genetic differentiation, Plumage divergence, Mito-nuclear discordance
National Category
Evolutionary Biology Biological Systematics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-350061 (URN)10.1016/j.ympev.2017.11.020 (DOI)000426199700017 ()29246816 (PubMedID)
Funder
NIH (National Institute of Health), S10RR029668NIH (National Institute of Health), S10RR027303Swedish Research Council, 2015-04402
Available from: 2018-05-04 Created: 2018-05-04 Last updated: 2018-05-04Bibliographically approved
Marzal, J. C., Rudh, A., Rogell, B., Ödeen, A., Lovlie, H., Rosher, C. & Qvarnström, A. (2017). Cryptic female Strawberry poison frogs experience elevated predation risk when associating with an aposematic partner. Ecology and Evolution, 7(2), 744-750
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cryptic female Strawberry poison frogs experience elevated predation risk when associating with an aposematic partner
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2017 (English)In: Ecology and Evolution, ISSN 2045-7758, E-ISSN 2045-7758, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 744-750Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Population divergence in sexual signals may lead to speciation through prezygotic isolation. Sexual signals can change solely due to variation in the level of natural selection acting against conspicuousness. However, directional mate choice (i.e., favoring conspicuousness) across different environments may lead to gene flow between populations, thereby delaying or even preventing the evolution of reproductive barriers and speciation. In this study, we test whether natural selection through predation upon mate-choosing females can favor corresponding changes in mate preferences. Our study system, Oophaga pumilio, is an extremely color polymorphic neotropical frog with two distinctive antipredator strategies: aposematism and crypsis. The conspicuous coloration and calling behavior of aposematic males may attract both cryptic and aposematic females, but predation may select against cryptic females choosing aposematic males. We used an experimental approach where domestic fowl were encouraged to find digitized images of cryptic frogs at different distances from aposematic partners. We found that the estimated survival time of a cryptic frog was reduced when associating with an aposematic partner. Hence, predation may act as a direct selective force on female choice, favoring evolution of color assortative mating that, in turn, may strengthen the divergence in coloration that natural selection has generated.

Keywords
aposematism, assortative mating, crypsis, Oophaga pumilio, predation, sexual selection, speciation
National Category
Zoology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-316051 (URN)10.1002/ece3.2662 (DOI)000392075300025 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council
Available from: 2017-02-23 Created: 2017-02-23 Last updated: 2017-11-29Bibliographically approved
Segami Marzal, J. C., Rudh, A., Rogell, B., Ödeen, A., Lovlie, H., Rosher, C. & Qvarnström, A. (2017). Cryptic female Strawberry poison frogs experience elevated predation risk when associating with an aposematic partner. Ecology and Evolution, 7(2), 744-750
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cryptic female Strawberry poison frogs experience elevated predation risk when associating with an aposematic partner
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2017 (English)In: Ecology and Evolution, ISSN 2045-7758, E-ISSN 2045-7758, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 744-750Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Population divergence in sexual signals may lead to speciation through prezygotic isolation. Sexual signals can change solely due to variation in the level of natural selection acting against conspicuousness. However, directional mate choice (i.e., favoring conspicuousness) across different environments may lead to gene flow between populations, thereby delaying or even preventing the evolution of reproductive barriers and speciation. In this study, we test whether natural selection through predation upon mate-choosing females can favor corresponding changes in mate preferences. Our study system, Oophaga pumilio, is an extremely color polymorphic neotropical frog with two distinctive antipredator strategies: aposematism and crypsis. The conspicuous coloration and calling behavior of aposematic males may attract both cryptic and aposematic females, but predation may select against cryptic females choosing aposematic males. We used an experimental approach where domestic fowl were encouraged to find digitized images of cryptic frogs at different distances from aposematic partners. We found that the estimated survival time of a cryptic frog was reduced when associating with an aposematic partner. Hence, predation may act as a direct selective force on female choice, favoring evolution of color assortative mating that, in turn, may strengthen the divergence in coloration that natural selection has generated.

Keywords
aposematism, assortative mating, crypsis, Oophaga pumilio, predation, sexual selection, speciation
National Category
Zoology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-345094 (URN)
Funder
Swedish Research Council
Available from: 2018-03-07 Created: 2018-03-07 Last updated: 2018-03-07
Boström, J. E., Haller, N. K., Dimitrova, M., Ödeen, A. & Kelber, A. (2017). The flicker fusion frequency of budgerigars (Melopsittacus undulatus) revisited. Journal of Comparative Physiology A. Sensory, neural, and behavioral physiology, 203(1), 15-22
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The flicker fusion frequency of budgerigars (Melopsittacus undulatus) revisited
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2017 (English)In: Journal of Comparative Physiology A. Sensory, neural, and behavioral physiology, ISSN 0340-7594, E-ISSN 1432-1351, Vol. 203, no 1, p. 15-22Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

While color vision and spatial resolution have been studied in many bird species, less is known about the temporal aspects of bird vision. High temporal resolution has been described in three species of passerines but it is unknown whether this is specific to passerines, to small actively flying birds, to insectivores or to birds living in bright habitats. Temporal resolution of vision is commonly tested by determining the flicker fusion frequency (FFF), at which the eye can no longer distinguish a flickering light from a constant light of equal intensity at different luminances. Using a food reward, we trained the birds to discriminate a constant light from a flickering light, at four different luminances between 750 and 7500 cd/m(2). The highest FFF found in one bird at 3500 cd/m(2) was 93 Hz. Three birds had higher FFF (82 Hz) at 7500 cd/m(2) than at 3500 cd/m(2). Six human subjects had lower FFF than the birds at 1500 but similar FFF at 750 cd/m(2). These results indicate that high temporal resolution is not a common trait for all small and active birds living in bright light habitats. Whether it is typical for passerines or for insectivorous birds remains to be tested.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
SPRINGER, 2017
Keywords
Visual ecology, Avian vision, Temporal resolution, Flicker fusion frequency, Psittaciformes
National Category
Zoology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-318612 (URN)10.1007/s00359-016-1130-z (DOI)000393670200002 ()27837238 (PubMedID)
Funder
Knut and Alice Wallenberg FoundationSwedish Research Council, 2012-2212Carl Tryggers foundation
Available from: 2017-03-27 Created: 2017-03-27 Last updated: 2017-11-29Bibliographically approved
Outomuro, D., Söderquist, L., Johansson, F., Ödeen, A. & Nordström, K. (2017). The price of looking sexy: visual ecology of a three-level predator–prey system. Functional Ecology, 31(3), 707-718
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The price of looking sexy: visual ecology of a three-level predator–prey system
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2017 (English)In: Functional Ecology, ISSN 0269-8463, E-ISSN 1365-2435, Vol. 31, no 3, p. 707-718Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Colour signals and colour vision play a pivotal role in intraspecific communication and predator-prey interactions. However, the costs of expressing conspicuous sexual signals at multiple trophic levels have been largely overlooked. Sexual signals can also experience character displacement in sympatric populations of closely related species, leading to potential changes in conspicuousness. We here investigate a bird-damselfly-fruit fly predator-prey system, where two closely related damselfly species have conspicuous, sexually selected wing coloration. The damselflies can occur in sympatry and allopatry, and reproductive character displacement in the coloration size has been previously reported. We quantify the damselfly wing reflectance from replicated sympatric and allopatric populations, and use receptor noise models to investigate the visual discriminability of the wing coloration for the bird, damselfly and fly vision systems, against natural backgrounds. We perform electroretinograms to study damselfly eye sensitivity. We also estimate damselfly predation risk in natural populations. We find that the chromatic component of wing coloration makes males highly discriminable to the predator, but not to the prey. However, female wing coloration is predominantly cryptic for the predator and prey, and interestingly, also for male damselflies. A female being cryptic to conspecifics likely reduces male harassment. The estimates of predation risk partially support the discriminability results. We also show that there is no difference in colour vision sensitivity between the two damselfly species and sexes, and no difference in wing coloration or its discriminability between sympatric and allopatric populations. Our results suggest that sexually selected traits can be antagonistically selected by predators and prey and that this antagonistic selection can be sex-dependent: males are paying a large cost in terms of conspicuousness, while females remain mostly cryptic. Our study thus emphasizes the need for investigating visual communication at multitrophic levels since the degree of colour discriminability can differ between predators, prey and the focal species.

National Category
Evolutionary Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-315225 (URN)10.1111/1365-2435.12769 (DOI)000395347300016 ()
Funder
Stiftelsen Olle Engkvist ByggmästareSwedish Research Council, 2012-4740
Available from: 2017-02-10 Created: 2017-02-10 Last updated: 2017-11-29Bibliographically approved
Mege, P., Ödeen, A., Thery, M., Picard, D. & Secondi, J. (2016). Partial Opsin Sequences Suggest UV-Sensitive Vision is Widespread in Caudata. Evolutionary biology, 43(1), 109-118
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Partial Opsin Sequences Suggest UV-Sensitive Vision is Widespread in Caudata
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2016 (English)In: Evolutionary biology, ISSN 0071-3260, E-ISSN 1934-2845, Vol. 43, no 1, p. 109-118Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Ultraviolet (UV) vision exists in several animal groups. Intuitively, one would expect this trait to be favoured in species living in bright environments, where UV light is the most present. However, UV sensitivity, as deduced from sequences of UV photoreceptors and/or ocular media transmittance, is also present in nocturnal species, raising questions about the selective pressure maintaining this perceptual ability. Amphibians are among the most nocturnal vertebrates but their visual ecology remains poorly understood relative to other groups. Perhaps because many of these species breed in environments that filter out a large part of UV radiation, physiological and behavioural studies of UV sensitivity in this group are scarce. We investigated the extent of UV vision in Caudata, the order of amphibians with the most nocturnal habits. We could recover sequences of the UV sensitive SWS1 opsin in 40 out of 58 species, belonging to 6 families. In all of these species, the evidence suggests the presence of functional SWS1 opsins under purifying selection, potentially allowing UV vision. Interestingly, most species whose opsin genes failed to amplify exhibited particular ecological features that could drive the loss of UV vision. This likely wide distribution of functional UV photoreceptors in Caudata sheds a new light on the visual ecology of amphibians and questions the function of UV vision in nocturnal animal species.

Keywords
SWS1 opsin gene, Ultraviolet vision, Caudata, Paralog gene, Tuning site, Nocturnal species, Amphibian, Sliding window, Ka/Ks
National Category
Evolutionary Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-285932 (URN)10.1007/s11692-015-9353-4 (DOI)000370817500009 ()
Available from: 2016-04-20 Created: 2016-04-20 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
Li, X., Dong, F., Lei, F., Alström, P., Zhang, R., Ödeen, A., . . . Yang, X. (2016). Shaped by uneven Pleistocene climate: mitochondrial phylogeographic pattern and population history of white wagtail Motacilla alba (Aves: Passeriformes). Journal of Avian Biology, 47(2), 263-274
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Shaped by uneven Pleistocene climate: mitochondrial phylogeographic pattern and population history of white wagtail Motacilla alba (Aves: Passeriformes)
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2016 (English)In: Journal of Avian Biology, ISSN 0908-8857, E-ISSN 1600-048X, Vol. 47, no 2, p. 263-274Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We studied the phylogeography and population history of the white wagtail Motacilla alba, which has a vast breeding range, covering areas with different Pleistocene climatic histories. The mitochondrial NADH dehydrogenase subunit II gene (ND2) and Control Region (CR) were analyzed for 273 individuals from 45 localities. Our data comprised all nine subspecies of white wagtail. Four primary clades were inferred (M, N, SW and SE), with indications of M. grandis being nested within M. alba. The oldest split was between two haplotypes from the endemic Moroccan M. a. subpersonata (clade M) and the others, at 0.63-0.96 Mya; other divergences were at 0.31-0.38 Mya. The entire differentiation falls within the part of the Pleistocene characterized by Milankovitch cycles of large amplitudes and durations. Clade N was distributed across the northern Palearctic; clade SW in southwestern Asia plus the British Isles and was predicted by Ecological niche models (ENMs) to occur also in central and south Europe; and clade SE was distributed in central and east Asia. The deep divergence within M. a. subpersonata may reflect retention of ancestral haplotypes. Regional differences in historical climates have had different impacts on different populations: clade N expanded after the last glacial maximum (LGM), whereas milder Pleistocene climate of east Asia allowed clade SE a longer expansion time (since MIS 5); clade SW expanded over a similarly long time as clade SE, which is untypical for European species. ENMs supported these conclusions in that the northern part of the Eurasian continent was unsuitable during the LGM, whereas southern parts remained suitable. The recent divergences and poor structure in the mitochondrial tree contrasts strongly with the pronounced, well defined phenotypical differentiation, indicating extremely fast plumage divergence.

National Category
Zoology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-295593 (URN)10.1111/jav.00826 (DOI)000373014800015 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 621-2013-5161
Available from: 2016-06-08 Created: 2016-06-08 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
Li, X., Dong, F., Lei, F., Alström, P., Zhang, R., Ödeen, A., . . . Yang, X. (2016). Shaped by uneven Pleistocene climate: mitochondrial phylogeographic pattern and population history of White Wagtail Motacilla alba (Aves: Passeriformes).. Journal of Avian Biology, 47, 263-274
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Shaped by uneven Pleistocene climate: mitochondrial phylogeographic pattern and population history of White Wagtail Motacilla alba (Aves: Passeriformes).
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2016 (English)In: Journal of Avian Biology, ISSN 0908-8857, E-ISSN 1600-048X, Vol. 47, p. 263-274Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We studied the phylogeography and population history of the white wagtail Motacilla alba, which has a vast breeding range, covering areas with different Pleistocene climatic histories. The mitochondrial NADH dehydrogenase subunit II gene (ND2) and Control Region (CR) were analyzed for 273 individuals from 45 localities. Our data comprised all nine subspecies of white wagtail. Four primary clades were inferred (M, N, SW and SE), with indications of M. grandis being nested within M. alba. The oldest split was between two haplotypes from the endemic Moroccan M. a. subpersonata (clade M) and the others, at 0.63–0.96 Mya; other divergences were at 0.31–0.38 Mya. The entire differentiation falls within the part of the Pleistocene characterized by Milankovitch cycles of large amplitudes and durations. Clade N was distributed across the northern Palearctic; clade SW in southwestern Asia plus the British Isles and was predicted by Ecological niche models (ENMs) to occur also in central and south Europe; and clade SE was distributed in central and east Asia. e deep divergence within M. a. subpersonata may reflect retention of ancestral haplotypes. Regional differences in historical climates have had different impacts on different populations: clade N expanded after the last glacial maximum (LGM), whereas milder Pleistocene climate of east Asia allowed clade SE a longer expansion time (since MIS 5); clade SW expanded over a similarly long time as clade SE, which is untypical for European species. ENMs supported these conclusions in that the northern part of the Eurasian continent was unsuitable during the LGM, whereas southern parts remained suitable. e recent divergences and poor structure in the mitochondrial tree contrasts strongly with the pronounced, well defined phenotypical differentiation, indicating extremely fast plumage divergence. 

National Category
Bioinformatics and Systems Biology Biological Systematics Ecology Evolutionary Biology Genetics Zoology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-341377 (URN)10.1111/jav.00826 (DOI)
Available from: 2018-02-07 Created: 2018-02-07 Last updated: 2018-02-13Bibliographically approved
Boström, J. E., Dimitrova, M., Canton, C., Hastad, O., Qvarnstrom, A. & Ödeen, A. (2016). Ultra-Rapid Vision in Birds. PLoS ONE, 11(3), Article ID e0151099.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Ultra-Rapid Vision in Birds
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2016 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 11, no 3, article id e0151099Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Flying animals need to accurately detect, identify and track fast-moving objects and these behavioral requirements are likely to strongly select for abilities to resolve visual detail in time. However, evidence of highly elevated temporal acuity relative to non-flying animals has so far been confined to insects while it has been missing in birds. With behavioral experiments on three wild passerine species, blue tits, collared and pied flycatchers, we demonstrate temporal acuities of vision far exceeding predictions based on the sizes and metabolic rates of these birds. This implies a history of strong natural selection on temporal resolution. These birds can resolve alternating light-dark cycles at up to 145 Hz (average: 129, 127 and 137, respectively), which is ca. 50 Hz over the highest frequency shown in any other vertebrate. We argue that rapid vision should confer a selective advantage in many bird species that are ecologically similar to the three species examined in our study. Thus, rapid vision may be a more typical avian trait than the famously sharp vision found in birds of prey.

National Category
Zoology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-294316 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0151099 (DOI)000372582800043 ()26990087 (PubMedID)
Funder
Carl Tryggers foundation , CTS 09: 425, CTS10: 432Swedish Research Council Formas, 22-2007-729Swedish Research Council, 621-2012-3722
Available from: 2016-05-18 Created: 2016-05-18 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
Alström, P., Jonsson, K. A., Jon, F., Ödeen, A., Ericson, P. G. P. & Irestedt, M. (2015). Dramatic niche shifts and morphological change in two insular bird species. Royal Society Open Science, 2(3), Article ID 140364.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Dramatic niche shifts and morphological change in two insular bird species
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2015 (English)In: Royal Society Open Science, E-ISSN 2054-5703, Vol. 2, no 3, article id 140364Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Colonizations of islands are often associated with rapid morphological divergence. We present two previously unrecognized cases of dramatic morphological change and niche shifts in connection with colonization of tropical forest-covered islands. These evolutionary changes have concealed the fact that the passerine birds madanga, Madanga ruficollis, from Buru, Indonesia, and São Tomé shorttail, Amaurocichla bocagii, from São Tomé, Gulf of Guinea, are forest-adapted members of the family Motacillidae (pipits and wagtails). We show that Madanga has diverged mainly in plumage, which may be the result of selection for improved camouflage in its new arboreal niche, while selection pressures for other morphological changes have probably been weak owing to preadaptations for the novel niche. By contrast, we suggest thatAmaurocichla's niche change has led to divergence in both structure and plumage.

National Category
Biological Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-286728 (URN)10.1098/rsos.140364 (DOI)000377965000003 ()26064613 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-04-21 Created: 2016-04-21 Last updated: 2019-01-02Bibliographically approved
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