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Frezza, S., Daniels, M. & Wilkin, A. (2019). Assessing Students' IT Professional Values in a Global Project Setting. ACM Transactions on Computing Education, 19(2), Article ID 9.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Assessing Students' IT Professional Values in a Global Project Setting
2019 (English)In: ACM Transactions on Computing Education, ISSN 1946-6226, E-ISSN 1946-6226, Vol. 19, no 2, article id 9Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This research aimed at evaluating the development and use of low-cost affective domain assessment instruments, culminating with personal and group characterization of representative global information technology (IT) professional values. Values and valuing are a compelling component of Bloom's affective domain of learning for engineering education. In helping students develop professional engineering competencies, it is essential that they develop not just cognitive knowledge of something but also values related to that knowledge and the ability to express these values in professional action. However, even if some professional values are identified, understood, and expressed, assessing student's values and valuing are difficult, and assessment instruments are often difficult to develop, particularly for assessing student learning in the context of a particular course. This exploratory study aimed at examining assessment of dispositional knowledge in the context of global software engineering (GSE). It focused on the development and use of a set of instruments for assessing affective domain student learning of global IT/software engineering (SE) professional values. The project included making explicit the IT professional values of interest among the participating faculty in the form of actionable value statements. Following a process derived from Thurstone scale development, the project included validation of these statements with an expert panel as question roots, followed by the use of these questions to investigate student and alumni receiving, responding, and valuing of these professional values. The effort needed to generate questionnaires suitable for course use was relatively low; these questionnaires were deployed to students and alumni from an open-ended global software engineering project course. Students responding reported significant agreement when receiving these global values, but sent more mixed responses in responding to and valuing them. The effort helped identify several actionable IT professional values worth reinforcing in future course offerings.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ASSOC COMPUTING MACHINERY, 2019
Keywords
Global software engineering, engineering values assessment, affective domain assessment, dispositional knowledge
National Category
Learning
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-377661 (URN)10.1145/3231710 (DOI)000458016600003 ()
Available from: 2019-02-25 Created: 2019-02-25 Last updated: 2019-02-25Bibliographically approved
Isomöttönen, V., Daniels, M., Cajander, Å., Pears, A. & McDermott, R. (2019). Searching for global employability: Can students capitalize on enabling learning environments?. ACM Transactions on Computing Education, 19(2), 11:1-29, Article ID 11.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Searching for global employability: Can students capitalize on enabling learning environments?
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2019 (English)In: ACM Transactions on Computing Education, ISSN 1946-6226, E-ISSN 1946-6226, Vol. 19, no 2, p. 11:1-29, article id 11Article in journal (Refereed) Published
National Category
Computer and Information Sciences Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-377662 (URN)10.1145/3277568 (DOI)000458016600005 ()
Available from: 2019-02-02 Created: 2019-02-25 Last updated: 2019-04-03Bibliographically approved
Cassel, L., Daniels, M., Goldweber, M. & Sheard, J. (2018). Four relections on the history of ITiCSE. ACM inroads, 9(4), 40-46
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Four relections on the history of ITiCSE
2018 (English)In: ACM inroads, ISSN 2153-2184, E-ISSN 2153-2192, Vol. 9, no 4, p. 40-46Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In 1996, recognizing a growing worldwide interest in community education, SIGCSE started a new conference in Europe—now known as the Innovation and Technology in Computer Science Education conference (ITiCSE). Following the success of the first ITiCSE, it has been held annually, typically in Europe, ever since. ITiCSE has developed its own special character, providing unique and valuable experiences for participants. In this article we reflect upon ITiCSE, its establishment and development into a leading venue for computing education researchers and practitioners.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ACM Digital Library, 2018
National Category
Computer Sciences
Research subject
Computer Science with specialization in Computer Science Education Research
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-367321 (URN)10.1145/3276302 (DOI)
Available from: 2018-11-29 Created: 2018-11-29 Last updated: 2019-01-30Bibliographically approved
Ballew, W., McDermott, R., Zarb, M., Daniels, M. & Clear, T. (2018). Investigations into the Use of Learning Agreements to Enhance Stakeholder Engagement and Promote Self-Efficacy in Computing Education. In: 2018 IEEE Frontiers in Education Conference (FIE): . Paper presented at 2018 IEEE Frontiers in Education Conference (FIE), Piscataway, NJ: IEEE, 2018. Piscataway, NJ: IEEE
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Investigations into the Use of Learning Agreements to Enhance Stakeholder Engagement and Promote Self-Efficacy in Computing Education
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2018 (English)In: 2018 IEEE Frontiers in Education Conference (FIE), Piscataway, NJ: IEEE, 2018Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

We examine controversial issues surrounding the locus of control in the implementation of learning agreements, plans or contracts, in the context of the U.K. university-level Graduate Apprenticeship scheme. We begin by giving an account of the stakeholders and their positions as well as their motivating principles as they strive to maintain their respective loci of control with regard to the negotiation of the learning agreement.  We then describe the idiomatic challenges to implementation of a learning agreement and subsequent plan in work-based learning environments with a range of employers from different sectors. An investigation into the manner in which learning agreement tenets are changed due to competing pressures on the various stakeholders leads to a discussion of challenges to successful prioritisation of the learning plan that occur as a result of mutually exclusive requirement sets. We discuss the challenges that may present themselves in which the requirements of one set of stakeholders appear to conflict with others and the questions that are raised as those involved seek to ensure suitable standards of academic quality in difficult cases. Finally, we discuss whether learning agreements are the most appropriate operational instruments for maintaining standards in these circumstances.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Piscataway, NJ: IEEE, 2018
Series
Frontiers in Education Conference, ISSN 0190-5848
National Category
Computer Sciences Pedagogy Didactics
Research subject
Computer Science with specialization in Computer Science Education Research
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-367326 (URN)10.1109/FIE.2018.8659138 (DOI)000468396902103 ()978-1-5386-1174-6 (ISBN)
Conference
2018 IEEE Frontiers in Education Conference (FIE), Piscataway, NJ: IEEE, 2018
Available from: 2019-03-07 Created: 2018-11-30 Last updated: 2019-08-01Bibliographically approved
Sigurgeirsson, D., Lárusdóttir, M., Hamdaga, M., Daniels, M. & Jónsson, B. (2018). Learning Outcome Outcomes: An Evaluation of Quality. In: Proc. 48th ASEE/IEEE Frontiers in Education Conference: . Paper presented at 48th IEEE Frontiers in Education Conference (FIE 2018), October 3–6, San Jose, CA. Piscataway, NJ: IEEE Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Learning Outcome Outcomes: An Evaluation of Quality
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2018 (English)In: Proc. 48th ASEE/IEEE Frontiers in Education Conference, Piscataway, NJ: IEEE Press, 2018Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Learning outcomes are a standard specification of knowledge, skills and capabilities that a student is expected to acquire by attending a course or a degree program. While, in theory, the process of evaluating learning outcomes appears to be trivial, in practice it is a complicated and daunting process. In this study, we evaluate how learning outcomes can be effectively applied. The work focuses on the quality of both the specification of the learning outcomes and the assessment of whether these outcomes are reached. We discuss different abstraction levels for learning outcomes and the issue of alignment between high-level and low-level learning outcomes. We also address the criteria for assessing whether a student is meeting a learning outcome.

Our work is focused on project-oriented courses, where assessing learning outcomes is seen as particularly challenging. In particular, we draw on an empirical study focused on systematically collecting key performance indicators of the progress towards achieving learning outcomes. The data gathering was done during the course through in-class questionnaires and individual diary notes, as a complementary process to the traditional observations made by the teacher running the course. This data serves as the basis for understanding how individual students advance towards the stated learning goals. We also conducted a focus group discussion after the course to better understand how to interpret the data collected during the course.

An important result of our work is forming an understanding and vocabulary regarding learning outcomes and the assessment of how well students meet these learning goals in project-based educational settings. In addition to this, we make the following major contributions:

  • We present a systematic methodology to gauge how well students meet learning outcomes through in-class self-evaluation.
  • We present the results of an empirical study of a process-oriented evaluation of the students' development towards stated learning outcomes.

We state some lessons learned from this process, that are applicable for designers of project-based courses.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Piscataway, NJ: IEEE Press, 2018
National Category
Educational Sciences
Research subject
Computer Science with specialization in Computer Science Education Research
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-367328 (URN)10.1109/FIE.2018.8659342 (DOI)000468396903071 ()978-1-5386-1174-6 (ISBN)
Conference
48th IEEE Frontiers in Education Conference (FIE 2018), October 3–6, San Jose, CA
Available from: 2019-03-07 Created: 2018-11-30 Last updated: 2019-07-18Bibliographically approved
Frezza, S., Pears, A., Daniels, M., Kann, V., Kapoor, A., McDermott, R., . . . Cajander, Å. (2018). Modeling global competencies for computing education. In: Proc. 23rd Conference on Innovation and Technology in Computer Science Education: . Paper presented at ITiCSE 2018, July 2–4, Larnaca, Cyprus (pp. 348-349). New York: ACM Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Modeling global competencies for computing education
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2018 (English)In: Proc. 23rd Conference on Innovation and Technology in Computer Science Education, New York: ACM Press, 2018, p. 348-349Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York: ACM Press, 2018
National Category
Computer Sciences Educational Sciences
Research subject
Computer Science with specialization in Computer Science Education Research
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-354991 (URN)10.1145/3197091.3205844 (DOI)978-1-4503-5707-4 (ISBN)
Conference
ITiCSE 2018, July 2–4, Larnaca, Cyprus
Available from: 2018-07-02 Created: 2018-06-25 Last updated: 2018-12-18Bibliographically approved
Daniels, M. (2018). My SIGCSE -> ITiCSE. ACM inroads, 9(4), 101-101
Open this publication in new window or tab >>My SIGCSE -> ITiCSE
2018 (English)In: ACM inroads, ISSN 2153-2184, E-ISSN 2153-2192, Vol. 9, no 4, p. 101-101Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

My SIGCSE is rather my ITiCSE, since this conference has become part of my identity. This is not just professional, it is also very personal. Education has always been special to me and attending conferences, such as SIGCSE and ITiCSE, has been essential to get a better foundation for my strong drive to improve education, both at Uppsala University and elsewhere. Thinking back to my first conferences the main impression is "coming home," to be where I belong among positive and supporting people discussing matters that I deeply care about. This is also evident in my line of research. I started my academic career as a researcher in formal methods in computer science, specifically in timing aspects in computer architecture and computer networks and subsequently changed to the area of discipline-based education research. Attending SIGCSE and ITiCSE has been instrumental in this shift as well as the creation of the Uppsala Computing Education research Group (UpCERG).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ACM Digital Library, 2018
National Category
Computer and Information Sciences Didactics
Research subject
Computer Science with specialization in Computer Science Education Research
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-367322 (URN)10.1145/3231745 (DOI)
Available from: 2018-11-29 Created: 2018-11-29 Last updated: 2019-02-07Bibliographically approved
Grande, V., Peters, A.-K., Daniels, M. & Tedre, M. (2018). "Participating under the influence": How role models affect the computing discipline, profession, and student population. In: Proc. 48th ASEE/IEEE Frontiers in Education Conference: . Paper presented at FIE 2018, October 3–6, San Jose, CA. Piscataway, NJ: IEEE Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>"Participating under the influence": How role models affect the computing discipline, profession, and student population
2018 (English)In: Proc. 48th ASEE/IEEE Frontiers in Education Conference, Piscataway, NJ: IEEE Press, 2018Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Piscataway, NJ: IEEE Press, 2018
National Category
Computer Sciences Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-364748 (URN)10.1109/FIE.2018.8658944 (DOI)978-1-5386-1174-6 (ISBN)
Conference
FIE 2018, October 3–6, San Jose, CA
Available from: 2019-03-07 Created: 2018-11-01 Last updated: 2019-04-03Bibliographically approved
McDermott, R., Zarb, M., Ballew, W., Daniels, M. & Isomöttönen, V. (2018). Phronesis, Authentic Learning and the Solution of Open-Ended Problems in Computing and Engineering Education. In: 2018 IEEE Frontiers in Education Conference (FIE): . Paper presented at 48th IEEE Frontiers in Education Conference (FIE), OCT 03-06, 2018, San Jose State Univ, San Jose, CA. Piscataway, NJ: IEEE
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Phronesis, Authentic Learning and the Solution of Open-Ended Problems in Computing and Engineering Education
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2018 (English)In: 2018 IEEE Frontiers in Education Conference (FIE), Piscataway, NJ: IEEE, 2018Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

One of the most significant changes in Higher Education pedagogy that has occurred over the past fifty years is the idea that university students should not just be taught theoretical subject knowledge but should engage with practical aspects of their course so developing the skills and professional competences that will allow them to gain successful employment after graduation. In this paper, we relate this development to the Aristotelian notion of intellectual virtue and specifically the concept of phronesis. We discuss the way in which this idea has developed from classical beginnings to the modern educational setting, and argue that the notion of phronesis, that is, practical wisdom or prudential judgement, is crucial to a range of activities which are fundamental to science, engineering and computing education. These include an understanding of what it means to engage in authentic learning and the solution of open-ended or ill-structured problems. We also discuss the role the concept plays in describing key features of work-based learning. Finally, we make some comments concerning the relative value the education system places on different types of knowledge, and why an appropriate understanding of phronesis allows for a proper appreciation of contingent knowledge within the curriculum.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Piscataway, NJ: IEEE, 2018
Series
Frontiers in Education Conference, ISSN 0190-5848
National Category
Computer Sciences Didactics
Research subject
Computer Science with specialization in Computer Science Education Research
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-367327 (URN)10.1109/FIE.2018.8658512 (DOI)000468396900073 ()978-1-5386-1174-6 (ISBN)
Conference
48th IEEE Frontiers in Education Conference (FIE), OCT 03-06, 2018, San Jose State Univ, San Jose, CA
Available from: 2019-03-07 Created: 2018-11-30 Last updated: 2019-08-01Bibliographically approved
Vasilchenko, A., Cajander, Å., Daniels, M. & Balaam, M. (2018). The self-flipped classroom concept: Underlying ideas and experiences. In: Proc. 48th ASEE/IEEE Frontiers in Education Conference: . Paper presented at 48th IEEE Frontiers in Education Conference (FIE 2018), October 3–6, San Jose, CA. Piscataway, NJ: IEEE Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The self-flipped classroom concept: Underlying ideas and experiences
2018 (English)In: Proc. 48th ASEE/IEEE Frontiers in Education Conference, Piscataway, NJ: IEEE Press, 2018Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In the modern fast changing world no formal education is able to provide learners with a complete set of knowledge, skills and competences that they would need to successfully compete on tomorrow's job market. Therefore, the role of universities is increasingly shifting towards provision of an environment where students have a chance to acquire lifelong learning skills. This paper presents underlying ideas of, and practical experiences with, an innovative pedagogy that addresses the lifelong learning skills acquisition along with additional benefits for science and technology students. The proposed approach, called self-flipped classroom (SFC), is built on a synergy of two pedagogies: learning through making and flipped classroom. To unveil the construct of the SFC, we discuss each of its components individually presenting appropriate theoretical grounding. We also report on our experiences from self-flipped classroom implementations in two countries, UK and Sweden, and in three different educational settings. From our work with the SFC concept we have identified four different roles the students can assume in a SFC scenario: creators, collaborators, communicators, and learners. We present our observations regarding the identified roles that have been found in the studied settings. We also outline some implications for teaching using the SFC concept and future research directions in this space.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Piscataway, NJ: IEEE Press, 2018
National Category
Educational Sciences Computer and Information Sciences
Research subject
Computer Science with specialization in Computer Science Education Research
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-367329 (URN)10.1109/FIE.2018.8658616 (DOI)000468396901002 ()978-1-5386-1174-6 (ISBN)
Conference
48th IEEE Frontiers in Education Conference (FIE 2018), October 3–6, San Jose, CA
Available from: 2019-03-07 Created: 2018-11-30 Last updated: 2019-07-18Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-8465-7629

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