uu.seUppsala University Publications
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Pears, Arnold
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 73) Show all publications
Frezza, S., Pears, A., Daniels, M., Kann, V., Kapoor, A., McDermott, R., . . . Cajander, Å. (2018). Modeling global competencies for computing education. In: Proc. 23rd Conference on Innovation and Technology in Computer Science Education: . Paper presented at ITiCSE 2018, July 2–4, Larnaca, Cyprus (pp. 348-349). New York: ACM Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Modeling global competencies for computing education
Show others...
2018 (English)In: Proc. 23rd Conference on Innovation and Technology in Computer Science Education, New York: ACM Press, 2018, p. 348-349Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York: ACM Press, 2018
National Category
Computer Sciences Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-354991 (URN)10.1145/3197091.3205844 (DOI)978-1-4503-5707-4 (ISBN)
Conference
ITiCSE 2018, July 2–4, Larnaca, Cyprus
Available from: 2018-07-02 Created: 2018-06-25 Last updated: 2018-07-02Bibliographically approved
Nordén, L.-Å., Mannila, L. & Pears, A. (2017). Development of a self-efficacy scale for digital competences in schools. In: 2017 IEEE Frontiers in Education Conference (FIE): Proc. 47th ASEE/IEEE Frontiers in Education Conference. Paper presented at IEEE Frontiers in Education Conference (FIE), 18-21 Oct. 2017, Indianapolis, IN, USA. IEEE Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Development of a self-efficacy scale for digital competences in schools
2017 (English)In: 2017 IEEE Frontiers in Education Conference (FIE): Proc. 47th ASEE/IEEE Frontiers in Education Conference, IEEE Press, 2017Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

As computer science enters the school curricula in an increasing number of countries, teachers must prepare to integrate digital competences into their teaching. This integration is a moving target where new methods, tools and applications appear and disappear at such rates that teachers must have confidence to independently and continuously explore what is new, what is relevant and how to plan their pedagogic activities to include digital competences. In this context approaches which can be used to study self-efficacy in digital competences among school teachers are desperately needed. With such a tool in place, we can make a baseline study and then follow teachers over time to measure changes in their self-efficacy, the cause of these changes and learn how to build their digital competence self-efficacy in different ways. The same tool can also be used to measure the self-efficacy in other populations, e.g., students in teacher training programs to ensure that they obtain an adequate self-efficacy in digital competences during their studies. This paper describes the development of a self-efficacy scale in digital competences, based on the DigiComp 2.0 framework definition of digital competence. The tool focuses predominantly on digital competences relevant for teachers in school years K-9.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
IEEE Press, 2017
Series
Frontiers in Education Conference, ISSN 0190-5848
National Category
Computer Sciences
Research subject
Computer Science with specialization in Computer Science Education Research
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-337184 (URN)10.1109/FIE.2017.8190673 (DOI)000426974900240 ()978-1-5090-5920-1 (ISBN)
Conference
IEEE Frontiers in Education Conference (FIE), 18-21 Oct. 2017, Indianapolis, IN, USA
Available from: 2017-12-21 Created: 2017-12-21 Last updated: 2018-08-09Bibliographically approved
Pears, A., Daniels, M. & Cajander, Å. (2017). The Archetype Learning Method: Scaffolding teamwork competences in the engineering classroom. In: 2017 IEEE Frontiers in Education Conference (FIE): Proc. 47th ASEE/IEEE Frontiers in Education Conference. Paper presented at FIE 2017, October 18–21, Indianapolis, IN, USA. Piscataway, NJ: IEEE Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Archetype Learning Method: Scaffolding teamwork competences in the engineering classroom
2017 (English)In: 2017 IEEE Frontiers in Education Conference (FIE): Proc. 47th ASEE/IEEE Frontiers in Education Conference, Piscataway, NJ: IEEE Press, 2017Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Globalisation of both the workplace and higher education is a fact for many Universities and Industries. For the universities the challenge lies both in identifying the needs and developing pedagogies suitable for preparing their students to become a workforce that can contribute in a global economy. Thus, a central issue is how to provide an appropriate level of background knowledge and skills which contribute to the success of the individual in the workplace, and to the success of their employers. Helping students develop the skills required for success in global software development teams provides a number of unique challenges and opportunities for the designers of engineering degree programmes. A central issue is that students bring with them local cultural norms, different native languages, and rhetorical traditions, which place an additional burden to the already difficult task of working effectively in a student engineering team. The contribution of this paper is the presentation of two learning activities; 1) structured role-play and 2) hypothetical archetypes, used within a method we call the "Archetype Learning Method" (ALM). The activities are geared towards enhancing the students' awareness of the underlying complexities inherent in participating in global software engineering and through that provide scaffolding to the development of teamwork skills. Our method provides students with strategies for engaging more productively in teamwork in a global context, hence contributing to the systematic development of one of the critical professional skills identified in the CHAOS report.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Piscataway, NJ: IEEE Press, 2017
Series
Frontiers in Education Conference, ISSN 0190-5848
National Category
Computer and Information Sciences Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-337019 (URN)10.1109/FIE.2017.8190548 (DOI)000426974900117 ()978-1-5090-5920-1 (ISBN)
Conference
FIE 2017, October 18–21, Indianapolis, IN, USA
Available from: 2017-12-14 Created: 2017-12-19 Last updated: 2018-08-09Bibliographically approved
McDermott, R., Zarb, M., Daniels, M., Nylén, A., Pears, A., Isomöttönen, V. & Caspersen, M. (2017). The Authenticity of 'Authentic' Assessment: Some Faculty Perceptions. In: 2017 IEEE Frontiers in Education Conference (FIE): Proc. 47th ASEE/IEEE Frontiers in Education Conference. Paper presented at FIE 2017, October 18–21, Indianapolis, IN, USA. Piscataway, NJ: IEEE Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Authenticity of 'Authentic' Assessment: Some Faculty Perceptions
Show others...
2017 (English)In: 2017 IEEE Frontiers in Education Conference (FIE): Proc. 47th ASEE/IEEE Frontiers in Education Conference, Piscataway, NJ: IEEE Press, 2017Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The attempt to embed Authenticity within the learning process in higher education has been a driving principle within many pedagogical approaches to Higher Education developed over the past three decades. The desire to allow students to learn in a manner that closely resembles the way in which expertise is developed outside the academic environment is a central element of problem-based, inquiry-based and project-based learning. Exploring the implications of authenticity for student achievement and the ways in which this should be assessed has led to innovative teaching methods and ways of evaluating student performance. Unfortunately, authenticity, and authentic assessment in particular, are concepts which are open to a range of interpretations, not least in an educational context where they may be used by both teachers and students with a variety of meanings. This paper investigates the working definitions of authentic assessment used by teaching staff within a Computing department in one U.K. university. We begin by giving an overview of some relevant aspects of authentic learning, which, historically, draws on pedagogies such as situated learning and social learning theory. We then focus on authenticity in the assessment process and describe a number of models which have been used to identify elements that contribute to this range of meaning. We analyse the descriptions of authentic assessment given by academic staff in terms of these concepts and suggest a framework which can be used to integrate the responses and characterise staff understanding of the authenticity. We then briefly compare these findings with other work investigating student responses to the same question and draw conclusions concerning the relevance of these factors on curriculum development, the use of assessment to drive learning and the role of staff development in promoting positive change in these areas. Finally, we make suggestions for further work.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Piscataway, NJ: IEEE Press, 2017
Series
Frontiers in Education Conference, ISSN 0190-5848
National Category
Educational Sciences Computer and Information Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-333186 (URN)10.1109/FIE.2017.8190604 (DOI)000426974900171 ()978-1-5090-5920-1 (ISBN)
Conference
FIE 2017, October 18–21, Indianapolis, IN, USA
Available from: 2017-12-14 Created: 2017-11-08 Last updated: 2018-08-09Bibliographically approved
Cajander, Å., Daniels, M., Golay, D., Moll, J., Nylén, A., Pears, A., . . . McDermott, R. (2017). Unexpected student behaviour and learning opportunities: Using the theory of planned behaviour to analyse a critical incident. In: 2017 IEEE Frontiers in Education Conference (FIE): Proc. 47th ASEE/IEEE Frontiers in Education Conference. Paper presented at FIE 2017, October 18–21, Indianapolis, IN, USA. Piscataway, NJ: IEEE Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Unexpected student behaviour and learning opportunities: Using the theory of planned behaviour to analyse a critical incident
Show others...
2017 (English)In: 2017 IEEE Frontiers in Education Conference (FIE): Proc. 47th ASEE/IEEE Frontiers in Education Conference, Piscataway, NJ: IEEE Press, 2017Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

One of the challenges in being a teacher is to set up an educational setting where the students receive relevant learning opportunities for the specific course, the students' education in general, and for their future. However, efforts to create such educational settings do not always work in the way that faculty has intended. In this paper we investigate one such effort seen from a critical incident perspective. Central to the analysis in this paper is how the Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB) can provide explanations for the incident. The critical incident can be summarised as students refusing to take part in a non-compulsory, but from the faculty perspective highly educational, activity. We describe the incident in depth, give the background for the educational intervention, and analyse the incident from the perspective of TPB. This paper makes two major contributions to engineering education research. The first is the development of a method for analysing critical teaching and learning incidents using the TPB. The critical incident analysis illustrates how the method is used to analyse and reason about the students' behaviour. Another contribution is the development of a range of insights which deal with challenges raised by learning interventions, especially those involved with acquiring hidden or "invisible skills" not usually seen or acknowledged by students to belong to core subject area of a degree program.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Piscataway, NJ: IEEE Press, 2017
Series
Frontiers in Education Conference, ISSN 0190-5848
National Category
Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-337016 (URN)10.1109/FIE.2017.8190466 (DOI)000426974900036 ()978-1-5090-5920-1 (ISBN)
Conference
FIE 2017, October 18–21, Indianapolis, IN, USA
Available from: 2017-12-14 Created: 2017-12-19 Last updated: 2018-08-09Bibliographically approved
Nylén, A., Cajander, Å., Daniels, M., Pears, A. & McDermott, R. (2017). Why are we here?: Student perspectives on the goal of STEM higher education. In: 2017 IEEE Frontiers in Education Conference (FIE): Proc. 47th ASEE/IEEE Frontiers in Education Conference. Paper presented at FIE 2017, October 18–21, Indianapolis, IN, USA. Piscataway, NJ: IEEE Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Why are we here?: Student perspectives on the goal of STEM higher education
Show others...
2017 (English)In: 2017 IEEE Frontiers in Education Conference (FIE): Proc. 47th ASEE/IEEE Frontiers in Education Conference, Piscataway, NJ: IEEE Press, 2017Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

A key component of the tertiary education system is the negotiation of common expectations in terms of pedagogy and the manner in which learning is scaffolded in the learning context. This paper addresses this interplay of perspectives by drawing on two elements of our previous work, a longitudinal study of student identity development [1] and a study contrasting project course students' experiences with teachers' expectations [2]. The paper develops a model of student interaction with teachers and the higher education system, which contributes to a better understanding of the consequences of recent changes and trends in higher education, e.g. demands for activating students, increased level of detail in course specifications, and examination of "non-core subject content". This is an immensely complex area and we approach this challenge with a focus on the issue of students rejecting learning opportunities. Through this lens we will identify and illustrate some essential aspects of how to adapt educational settings to better accommodate how students behave and view the goal of their education.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Piscataway, NJ: IEEE Press, 2017
Series
Frontiers in Education Conference
National Category
Computer and Information Sciences Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-333183 (URN)10.1109/FIE.2017.8190639 (DOI)000426974900206 ()978-1-5090-5920-1 (ISBN)
Conference
FIE 2017, October 18–21, Indianapolis, IN, USA
Available from: 2017-12-14 Created: 2017-11-08 Last updated: 2018-08-09Bibliographically approved
Pears, A., Nylén, A. & Daniels, M. (2016). A critical analysis of trends in student-centric engineering education and their implications for learning. In: Proc. 46th ASEE/IEEE Frontiers in Education Conference: . Paper presented at IEEE Frontiers in Education Conference (FIE) 2016, October 12–15, Erie, PA. Piscataway, NJ: IEEE Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A critical analysis of trends in student-centric engineering education and their implications for learning
2016 (English)In: Proc. 46th ASEE/IEEE Frontiers in Education Conference, Piscataway, NJ: IEEE Press, 2016Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Student-centric education has emerged as a dominant aspect of Higher Education policy over the last two decades. Much has been written about the benefits of student active educational approaches, and applied educational research, for instance the meta-study of Hattie, places emphasis on student-centric learning practices that enhance achieved learning outcomes.

Most existing studies have been evaluations of single courses. In contrast this study focusses on the complete study context of the learner, who typically is in the situation of reading two or three courses simultaneously.

Our primary goal in this paper is to explore potential challenges as we attempt to scale up active learning to encompass the full curricula. We use a mixture of interview and survey data collected from staff, combined with course schedules and student input to explore some of the potential implications of mandating a student-centric approach over an entire curriculum.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Piscataway, NJ: IEEE Press, 2016
Series
Frontiers in Education Conference
National Category
Computer Sciences Educational Sciences
Research subject
Computer Science with specialization in Computer Science Education Research
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-304292 (URN)10.1109/FIE.2016.7757715 (DOI)000392331500363 ()978-1-5090-1790-4 (ISBN)
Conference
IEEE Frontiers in Education Conference (FIE) 2016, October 12–15, Erie, PA
Available from: 2016-12-01 Created: 2016-10-03 Last updated: 2018-01-14Bibliographically approved
Pears, A. & Nylén, A. (2015). Implications of anonymous assessment. In: Proc. 45th ASEE/IEEE Frontiers in Education Conference: . Paper presented at FIE 2015, October 21–24, El Paso, TX (pp. 1404-1408). Piscataway, NJ: IEEE Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Implications of anonymous assessment
2015 (English)In: Proc. 45th ASEE/IEEE Frontiers in Education Conference, Piscataway, NJ: IEEE Press, 2015, p. 1404-1408Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The role of anonymous assessment in ensuring fair and equitable outcomes for students has been one of the major tenets of educational reform over the last few decades [1]. One of the major goals of these efforts is to reduce the impact of subconscious discriminatory behaviour in assigning grades based on perceptions of ability of gender or minority groups by the examiner. Recently however research has been emerging which challenges the widespread assumptions about the benefits of anonymity drawn from Newstead's work. Contrary results include the work of Dorsey and Colliver, 1995, in medical education, and Batten et al. 2013, who explore the impact of student reputation on assessment. These and many other studies conclude that anonymous assessment resulted in no apparent changes in assessment outcomes. In this paper we explore the implications of anonymity taking examples from educational settings where student anonymity is already an adopted practice. We discuss the positive and negative implications of student anonymity, and identify areas for future research.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Piscataway, NJ: IEEE Press, 2015
Series
Frontiers in Education Conference, ISSN 0190-5848
National Category
Computer and Information Sciences Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-270079 (URN)10.1109/FIE.2015.7344251 (DOI)000371705200236 ()9781479984534 (ISBN)
Conference
FIE 2015, October 21–24, El Paso, TX
Available from: 2015-10-24 Created: 2015-12-21 Last updated: 2018-01-10Bibliographically approved
Peters, A.-K., Berglund, A., Eckerdal, A. & Pears, A. (2015). Second year Computer Science and IT students' experience of participation in the discipline. In: Proc. 15th International Conference on Computing Education Research: Koli Calling (pp. 68-76). New York: ACM Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Second year Computer Science and IT students' experience of participation in the discipline
2015 (English)In: Proc. 15th International Conference on Computing Education Research: Koli Calling, New York: ACM Press, 2015, p. 68-76Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York: ACM Press, 2015
National Category
Computer Sciences Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-269178 (URN)10.1145/2828959.2828962 (DOI)978-1-4503-4020-5 (ISBN)
Available from: 2015-11-21 Created: 2015-12-14 Last updated: 2018-01-10Bibliographically approved
Berglund, A., Pears, A., Nylén, A., Ahmad, F., Alghamdi, B., Alghamdi, K., . . . Shenify, M. (2015). Teaching and Learning Computer Science at Al Baha University, Saudi Arabia: Insights from a staff development course. In: Proc. 3rd International Conference on Learning and Teaching in Computing and Engineering: . Paper presented at LaTiCE 2015 (pp. 1-6). Los Alamitos, CA: IEEE Computer Society
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Teaching and Learning Computer Science at Al Baha University, Saudi Arabia: Insights from a staff development course
Show others...
2015 (English)In: Proc. 3rd International Conference on Learning and Teaching in Computing and Engineering, Los Alamitos, CA: IEEE Computer Society, 2015, p. 1-6Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In this special session we meet a set of projects in computer science and engineering education at a university in Saudi Arabia. They are the product of a pedagogical development course ran in collaboration with a Swedish university during the academic year 2013/2014. The projects reflect the local situation, with its possibilities and challenges, and suggest steps to take, in the local environment, to enhance education. As such it is a unique document that brings insights from computer science and engineering education into the international literature.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Los Alamitos, CA: IEEE Computer Society, 2015
Keywords
staff development, Saudi Arabia, computer science education, learning and teaching
National Category
Computer and Information Sciences
Research subject
Computer Science with specialization in Computer Science Education Research
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-252763 (URN)10.1109/LaTiCE.2015.50 (DOI)000380511500001 ()9781479999675 (ISBN)
External cooperation:
Conference
LaTiCE 2015
Available from: 2015-06-24 Created: 2015-05-11 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved
Organisations

Search in DiVA

Show all publications