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Weis, Jan
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Eckerbom, P., Hansell, P., Cox, E., Buchanan, C., Weis, J., Palm, F., . . . Liss, P. (2019). Multiparametric assessment of renal physiology in healthy volunteers using noninvasive magnetic resonance imaging. American Journal of Physiology - Renal Physiology, 316(4), F693-F702
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Multiparametric assessment of renal physiology in healthy volunteers using noninvasive magnetic resonance imaging
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2019 (English)In: American Journal of Physiology - Renal Physiology, ISSN 1931-857X, E-ISSN 1522-1466, Vol. 316, no 4, p. F693-F702Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Non-invasive methods of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can quantify parameters of kidney function. The main purpose of this study was to determine baseline values of such parameters in healthy volunteers. In 28 healthy volunteers (15 females, 13 males), Arterial Spin Labeling (ASL) to estimate regional renal perfusion, Blood Oxygen Level Dependent (BOLD) transverse relaxation rate (R2*) to estimate oxygenation, and Apparent Diffusion Coefficient (ADC), true diffusion (D) and longitudinal relaxation time (T1) to estimate tissue properties were determined bilaterally in the cortex, outer and inner medulla. Additionally, phase contrast (PC) MRI was applied in the renal arteries to quantify total renal blood flow. The results demonstrated profound gradients of perfusion, ADC and D with highest values in the kidney cortex and a decrease towards the inner medulla. R2* and T1 were lowest in kidney cortex and increased towards the inner medulla. Total renal blood flow correlated with body surface area, body mass index and renal volume. Similar patterns in all investigated parameters were observed in females and males. In conclusion, non-invasive MRI provides useful tools to evaluate intra renal differences in blood flow, perfusion, diffusion, oxygenation and structural properties of the kidney tissue. As such, this experimental approach has the potential to advance our current understanding regarding normal physiology and the pathological processes associated with acute and chronic kidney disease.

Keywords
ASL, BOLD, Diffusion, Kidney, MRI
National Category
Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Medical Imaging Urology and Nephrology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-374891 (URN)10.1152/ajprenal.00486.2018 (DOI)000463879600010 ()30648907 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Diabetes AssociationSwedish Child Diabetes FoundationSwedish Research CouncilErnfors Foundation
Available from: 2019-01-24 Created: 2019-01-24 Last updated: 2019-05-03Bibliographically approved
Nelander, M., Hannsberger, D., Sundström Poromaa, I., Bergman, L., Weis, J., Åkerud, H., . . . Wikström, A.-K. (2018). Assessment of cerebral perfusion and edema in preeclampsia with intravoxel incoherent motion MRI.. Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, 97(10), 1212-1218
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Assessment of cerebral perfusion and edema in preeclampsia with intravoxel incoherent motion MRI.
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2018 (English)In: Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6349, E-ISSN 1600-0412, Vol. 97, no 10, p. 1212-1218Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

INTRODUCTION: Cerebral complications are the main reasons for morbidity and mortality in preeclampsia and eclampsia. As yet, we do not know whether the pathophysiology entails hypo- or hyperperfusion of the brain, or how and when edema emerges, due to the difficulty of examining the cerebral circulation.

MATERIAL AND METHODS: We have used a non-invasive diffusion weighted-magnetic resonance imaging technique, intravoxel incoherent motion, to study cerebral perfusion on the capillary level and cerebral edema in women with preeclampsia (n = 30), normal pregnancy (n = 32), and non-pregnant women (n = 16). Estimates of cerebral blood volume, blood flow, and edema were measured in 5 different regions. These points were chosen to represent blood supply areas of both the carotid and vertebrobasilar arteries, and to include both white and gray matter.

RESULTS: Except for the caudate nucleus, we did not detect any differences in cerebral perfusion measures on a group level. In the caudate nucleus, we found lower cerebral blood volume and lower blood flow in preeclampsia than in either normal pregnancy (P = .01 and P = .03, respectively) or non-pregnant women (both P = .02). No differences in edema were detected between study groups.

CONCLUSION: The cerebral perfusion measures were comparable between the study groups, except for a portion of the basal ganglia where hypoperfusion was detected in preeclampsia but not in normal pregnancy or non-pregnant women.

Keywords
cerebral circulation, eclampsia, edema, intravoxel incoherent motion, magnetic resonance imaging, perfusion, preeclampsia
National Category
Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-357423 (URN)10.1111/aogs.13383 (DOI)000444070900010 ()29786833 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2014-3561
Available from: 2018-08-16 Created: 2018-08-16 Last updated: 2018-11-14Bibliographically approved
Nelander, M., Wikström, A.-K., Weis, J., Bergman, L., Larsson, A., Sundström Poromaa, I. & Wikström, J. (2018). Cerebral osmolytes and plasma osmolality in pregnancy and preeclampsia: a proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy study. American Journal of Hypertension, 31(7), 847-853
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cerebral osmolytes and plasma osmolality in pregnancy and preeclampsia: a proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy study
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2018 (English)In: American Journal of Hypertension, ISSN 0895-7061, E-ISSN 1941-7225, Vol. 31, no 7, p. 847-853Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Cerebral complications contribute substantially to mortality in preeclampsia. Pregnancy calls for extensive maternal adaptations, some associated with increased propensity for seizures, but the pathophysiology behind the eclamptic seizures is not fully understood. Plasma osmolality and sodium levels are lowered in pregnancy. This could result in extrusion of cerebral organic osmolytes, including the excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate, but this remains to be determined. The hypothesis of this study was that cerebral levels of organic osmolytes are decreased during pregnancy, and that this decrease is even more pronounced in women with preeclampsia.

Method: We used proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy to compare levels of cerebral organic osmolytes, in women with preeclampsia (n=30), normal pregnancy (n=32) and non-pregnant controls (n=16). Cerebral levels organic osmolytes were further correlated to plasma osmolality, and plasma levels of glutamate and sodium.

Results: Compared to non-pregnant women, women with normal pregnancy and preeclampsia had lower levels of the cerebral osmolytes myo-inositol, choline and creatine (p=0.001 or less), and all these metabolites correlated with each other (p<0.05). Women with normal pregnancies and preeclampsia had similar levels of osmolytes, except for glutamate, which was significantly lower in preeclampsia. Cerebral and plasma glutamate levels were negatively correlated with each other (p<0.008), and cerebral myo-inositol, choline and creatine levels were all positively correlated with both plasma osmolality and sodium levels (p<0.05).

Conclusion: Our results indicate that pregnancy is associated with extrusion of cerebral organic osmolytes. This includes the excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate, which may be involved in the pathophysiology of seizures in preeclampsia.

Keywords
Preeclampsia, eclampsia, proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy, cerebral osmolytes, glutamate
National Category
Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Medicine
Research subject
Obstetrics and Gynaecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-341642 (URN)10.1093/ajh/hpy019 (DOI)000435458800015 ()29415199 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2014-3561
Available from: 2018-02-12 Created: 2018-02-12 Last updated: 2018-08-29Bibliographically approved
Weis, J., Kullberg, J. & Ahlström, H. (2018). Multiple breath-hold proton spectroscopy of human liver at 3T: Relaxation times and concentrations of glycogen, choline, and lipids. Journal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging, 47, 410-417
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Multiple breath-hold proton spectroscopy of human liver at 3T: Relaxation times and concentrations of glycogen, choline, and lipids
2018 (English)In: Journal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging, ISSN 1053-1807, E-ISSN 1522-2586, Vol. 47, p. 410-417Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose:

To evaluate the feasibility of an expiration multiple breath-hold H-1-MRS technique to measure glycogen (Glycg), choline-containing compounds (CCC), and lipid relaxation times T-1, T-2, and their concentrations in normal human liver.

Materials and Methods:

Thirty healthy volunteers were recruited. Experiments were performed at 3T. Multiple expiration breath-hold single-voxel point-resolved spectroscopy (PRESS) technique was used for localization. Water-suppressed spectra were used for the estimation of Glycg, CCC, lipid methylene (CH2)(n) relaxation times and concentrations. Residual water lines were removed by the Hankel Lanczos singular value decomposition filter. After phase correction and frequency alignment, spectra were averaged and processed by LCModel. Summed signals of Glycg resonances H2H4', H3, and H5 between 3.6 and 4ppm were used to estimate their apparent relaxation times and concentration. Glycg, CCC, and lipid content were estimated from relaxation corrected spectral intensity ratios to unsuppressed water line.

Results:

Relaxation times were measured for liver Glycg (T-1, 892 +/- 126 msec; T-2, 134 msec), CCC (T-1, 842 +/- 75 msec; T-2, 505 msec), lipid (CH2)(n) (T-1, 402 +/- 19 msec; T-2, 52 +/- 3 msec), and water (T-1, 990 +/- 89 msec; T-2, 30 +/- 2 msec). Mean CCC and lipid concentrations of healthy liver were 7.8 +/- 1.3 mM and 15.8 +/- 23.6 mM, respectively. Glycg content was found lower in the morning (48 +/- 21 mM) compared to the afternoon (145 +/- 50 mM).

Conclusion:

Multiple breath-hold H-1-MRS together with dedicated postprocessing is a feasible technique for the quantification of liver Glycg, CCC, and lipid relaxation times and concentrations.

Keywords
choline, glycogen, liver, magnetic resonance spectroscopy, quantification, relaxation times
National Category
Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Medical Imaging
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-322145 (URN)10.1002/jmri.25734 (DOI)000419991000011 ()28419608 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-05-16 Created: 2017-05-16 Last updated: 2018-05-09Bibliographically approved
Tammela, T. L., Häggman, M., Ladjevardi, S., Taari, K., Isotalo, T., Lennernäs, H., . . . Ahlström, H. (2017). An Intraprostatic Modified Release Formulation of Antiandrogen 2-Hydroxyflutamide for Localized Prostate Cancer. Journal of Urology, 198(6), 1333-1339
Open this publication in new window or tab >>An Intraprostatic Modified Release Formulation of Antiandrogen 2-Hydroxyflutamide for Localized Prostate Cancer
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2017 (English)In: Journal of Urology, ISSN 0022-5347, E-ISSN 1527-3792, Vol. 198, no 6, p. 1333-1339Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

PURPOSE: To investigate tolerability, safety and antitumor effects of a novel intra-prostatic depot formulation of antiandrogen 2-hydroxyflutamide (2-HOF in NanoZolid(®)) in men with localized prostate cancer (PCa).

MATERIALS AND METHODS: Two clinical trials, LPC-002 and LPC-003, were conducted on a total of 47 men. The formulation was injected transrectally into the prostate with ultrasound guidance. In LPC-002 the effects on prostate specific antigen (PSA) and prostate volume (PV) were measured over 6 months on 24 patients. In LPC-003, antitumor effects were evaluated with histopathology, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) including spectroscopy (MRS) during 6 or 8 weeks on 23 patients. In both studies, testosterone and 2-HOF in plasma were measured, as well as quality-of-life parameters.

RESULTS: In LPC-002 (mean dose 690 mg) a reduction in PSA and PV was observed. The nadir values for PSA and PV were on average 24.9 % and 14.0 % below baseline, respectively. When increasing the dose in LPC-003 (920 mg and 1740 mg), the average PSA dropped 16 % and 23 %, respectively, after 6 and 8 weeks. MRI/MRS showed morphological changes and a global drop in metabolite concentrations following treatment indicating an antitumor response. The injections did not result in hormone related side effects. In total, three serious adverse events were reported, all resolved by oral antibiotic treatment.

CONCLUSIONS: The intraprostatic injections of 2-HOF depot formulations indicated anti-tumor effects and proved safe and tolerable. However, for better anti-cancer effects higher doses and better dose distribution are suggested.

Keywords
NanoZolid, Prostate cancer, bioresorbable, calcium sulphate, local treatment, modified-release
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences Urology and Nephrology Cancer and Oncology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-327250 (URN)10.1016/j.juro.2017.07.072 (DOI)000417150900023 ()28736321 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-08-07 Created: 2017-08-07 Last updated: 2018-03-06Bibliographically approved
Nelander, M., Weis, J., Bergman, L., Larsson, A., Wikström, A.-K. & Wikström, J. (2017). Cerebral Magnesium Levels in Preeclampsia; A Phosphorus Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Study. American Journal of Hypertension, 30(7), 667-672
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cerebral Magnesium Levels in Preeclampsia; A Phosphorus Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Study
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2017 (English)In: American Journal of Hypertension, ISSN 0895-7061, E-ISSN 1941-7225, Vol. 30, no 7, p. 667-672Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Magnesium sulfate (MgSO4) is used as a prophylaxis for eclamptic seizures. The exact mechanism of action is not fully established. We used phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy (31P-MRS) to investigate if cerebral magnesium (Mg2+) levels differ between women with preeclampsia, normal pregnant, and nonpregnant women.

METHODS: This cross-sectional study comprised 28 women with preeclampsia, 30 women with normal pregnancies in corresponding gestational week (range: 23-41 weeks) and 11 nonpregnant healthy controls. All women underwent 31P-MRS from the parieto-occipital region of the brain and were interviewed about cerebral symptoms. Differences between groups were assessed by analysis of variance and Tukey's post-hoc test. Correlations between Mg2+ levels and specific neurological symptoms were estimated with Spearman's rank test.

RESULTS: Mean maternal cerebral Mg2+ levels were lower in women with preeclampsia (0.12 mM ± 0.02) compared to normal pregnant controls (0.14 mM ± 0.03) (P = 0.04). Nonpregnant and normal pregnant women did not differ in Mg2+ levels. Among women with preeclampsia, lower Mg2+ levels correlated with presence of visual disturbances (P = 0.04). Plasma levels of Mg2+ did not differ between preeclampsia and normal pregnancy.

CONCLUSIONS: Women with preeclampsia have reduced cerebral Mg2+ levels, which could explain the potent antiseizure prophylactic properties of MgSO4. Within the preeclampsia group, women with visual disturbances have lower levels of Mg2+ than those without such symptoms.

Keywords
31P-magnetic resonance spectroscopy, blood pressure, eclampsia, hypertension, magnesium, magnetic resonance, preeclampsia.
National Category
Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-319608 (URN)10.1093/ajh/hpx022 (DOI)000407115100009 ()28338765 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2014-3561
Available from: 2017-04-06 Created: 2017-04-06 Last updated: 2018-02-22Bibliographically approved
Carlbom, L., Weis, J., Johansson, L., Korsgren, O. & Ahlström, H. (2017). Pre-transplantation ³¹P-magnetic resonance spectroscopy for quality assessment of human pancreatic grafts: A feasibility study. Magnetic Resonance Imaging, 39, 98-102
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Pre-transplantation ³¹P-magnetic resonance spectroscopy for quality assessment of human pancreatic grafts: A feasibility study
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2017 (English)In: Magnetic Resonance Imaging, ISSN 0730-725X, E-ISSN 1873-5894, Vol. 39, p. 98-102Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: To investigate the feasibility of using (31)P-MRS for objective non-invasive quality assessment of human pancreas grafts prior to transplantation or islet isolation.

Materials and methods: Pancreata from 5 human donors, 3 males and 2 females, aged 49-78years, with body mass index (BMI) 22-31kg/m(2), were included. Pancreata were perfused with histidine-tryptophan-ketoglutarate solution during procurement and stored in hypothermic condition (4°C) for 21-44h. During the period of hypothermic storage repeated spectra were obtained for each graft by (31)P-MRS (1.5Tesla) to measure the cold ischemia time (CIT) dependent changes of the phosphorous metabolites adenosine triphosphate (ATP), phosphomonoesters (PME), phosphodiesters (PDE) and inorganic phosphate (Pi), in the grafts. Graft temperature was measured immediately before and after MR-examination. Reference spectrum for non-viable tissue was obtained after graft exposure to room temperature.

Results: PME/Pi, PDE/Pi and ATP/Pi spectral intensities ratios decreased with increasing CIT, reflecting the decreased viability of the grafts. PME/Pi ratio was the most discriminatory variable at prolonged CIT. (31)P-MRS could be performed without significantly increasing graft temperature.

Conclusions: (31)P-MRS may provide quantitative parameters for evaluating graft viability ex vivo, and is a promising tool for objective non-invasive assessment of the quality of human pancreas grafts prior to transplantation or islet isolation.

Keywords
P-31-MR spectroscopy, Organ viability, Pancreas transplantation, Cold ischemia, ATP, PME
National Category
Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Medical Imaging
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-315894 (URN)10.1016/j.mri.2017.02.004 (DOI)000401051200012 ()28188872 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, K2013-64X-08268-26-3Swedish Research Council, 921-2014-7054Swedish Research Council, K2015-54X-12219-19-4Swedish Child Diabetes FoundationSwedish Diabetes AssociationEXODIAB - Excellence of Diabetes Research in Sweden
Note

Title in WOS: Pre-transplantation P-31-magnetic resonance spectroscopy for quality assessment of human pancreatic grafts - A feasibility study

Available from: 2017-02-22 Created: 2017-02-22 Last updated: 2018-01-25Bibliographically approved
Weis, J., von Below, C., Tolf, A., Ortiz-Nieto, F., Wassberg, C., Haggman, M., . . . Ahlström, H. (2017). Quantification of metabolite concentrations in benign and malignant prostate tissues using 3D proton MR spectroscopic imaging. Journal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging, 45(4), 1232-1240
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Quantification of metabolite concentrations in benign and malignant prostate tissues using 3D proton MR spectroscopic imaging
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2017 (English)In: Journal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging, ISSN 1053-1807, E-ISSN 1522-2586, Vol. 45, no 4, p. 1232-1240Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

PURPOSE: To estimate concentrations of choline (Cho), spermine (Spm), and citrate (Cit) in prostate tissue using 3D proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) with water as an internal concentration reference as well as to assess the relationships between the measured metabolites and also between the metabolites and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC).

MATERIALS AND METHODS: Forty-six prostate cancer patients were scanned at 3T. Spectra were acquired with the point-resolved spectroscopy (PRESS) localization technique. Single-voxel spectra of four healthy volunteers were used to estimate T1 relaxation time of Spm. Spm, Cho concentrations, and ADC values of benign prostate tissues were correlated with Cit content.

RESULTS: The T1 value, 708 ± 132 msec, was estimated for Spm. Mean concentrations in the benign peripheral zone (PZ) were Cho, 4.5 ± 1 mM, Spm, 13.0 ± 4.4 mM, Cit, 64.4 ± 16.1 mM. Corresponding values in the benign central gland (CG) were Cho, 3.6 ± 1 mM, Spm, 13.3 ± 4.5 mM, Cit, 34.3 ± 12.9 mM. Concentrations of Cit and Spm were positively correlated in the benign PZ zone (r = 0.730) and CG (r = 0.664). Positive correlation was found between Cit and Cho in the benign CG (r = 0.705). Whereas Cit and ADC were positively correlated in the benign PZ (r = 0.673), only low correlation was found in CG (r = 0.265).

CONCLUSION: We have shown that it is possible to perform water-referenced quantitative 3D MRSI of the prostate at the cost of a relatively short prolongation of the acquisition time. The individual metabolite concentrations provide additional information compared to the previously used metabolite-to-citrate ratios.

National Category
Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Medical Imaging
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-304633 (URN)10.1002/jmri.25443 (DOI)000397489100030 ()27556571 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-10-06 Created: 2017-05-30 Last updated: 2017-05-30Bibliographically approved
Sohlberg, S., Mulic-Lutvica, A., Olovsson, M., Weis, J., Axelsson, O., Wikström, J. & Wikström, A.-K. (2015). MRI estimated placental perfusion in fetal growth assessment. Ultrasound in Obstetrics and Gynecology, 46(6), 700-705
Open this publication in new window or tab >>MRI estimated placental perfusion in fetal growth assessment
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2015 (English)In: Ultrasound in Obstetrics and Gynecology, ISSN 0960-7692, E-ISSN 1469-0705, Vol. 46, no 6, p. 700-705Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective

This study aimed to evaluate placental perfusion fraction estimated by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in vivo as a marker of placental function.

Methods

The study population included 35 pregnant women, of whom 13 had preeclampsia, examined at gestational weeks 22 to 40. Each woman underwent, within a 24 hour period: a MRI diffusion-weighted sequence (from which we calculated the placental perfusion fraction); venous blood sampling; and an ultrasound examination including estimation of fetal weight, amniotic fluid index and Doppler velocity measurements. We compared the perfusion fraction in pregnancies with and without fetal growth restriction and estimated correlations between the perfusion fraction and ultrasound estimates and plasma markers with linear regression. The associations between the placental perfusion fraction and ultrasound estimates were modified by the presence of preeclampsia (p < 0.05) and therefore we included an interaction term between preeclampsia and the covariates in the models.

Results

The median placental perfusion fraction in pregnancies with and without fetal growth restriction was 21% and 32%, respectively (p = 0.005). The correlations between the placental perfusion fraction and ultrasound estimates and plasma markers were highly significant (p-values 0.002 to 0.0001). The highest coefficient of determination (R2= 0.56) for placental perfusion fraction was found for a model including pulsatility index in ductus venosus, plasma level of sFlt1, estimated fetal weight and presence of preeclampsia.

Conclusion

The placental perfusion fraction has potential to contribute to the clinical assessment in cases of placental insufficiency.

Keywords
Intrauterine growth restriction, Small for gestational age, Magnetic resonance imaging, Placenta, Perfusion, Perfusion fraction
National Category
Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Medicine Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Medical Imaging
Research subject
Medical Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-239293 (URN)10.1002/uog.14786 (DOI)000365855700011 ()25640054 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2014-3561
Available from: 2014-12-21 Created: 2014-12-21 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Ladjevardi, S., Weis, J., Sörensen, J., Tolf, A., Häggman, M., von Below, C. & Jorulf, H. (2014). A Comparison of Different Imaging Techniques for Localisation of Cancers in the Prostate. Open Prostate Cancer Journal, 7, 1-6
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Comparison of Different Imaging Techniques for Localisation of Cancers in the Prostate
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2014 (English)In: Open Prostate Cancer Journal, ISSN 1876-8229, Vol. 7, p. 1-6Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The diagnostic accuracy of standard transrectal ultrasound-guided (TRUL) biopsy is limited due to the finite number of cores that can be obtained. It has been shown that the technique is not sufficiently reliable in defining the location and extent of prostatic cancer. The main aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and positron emission tomography (PET/CT) imaging techniques in pinpointing potential tumour lesions prior to prostate biopsy.

Material and methods

The study cohort consisted of 45 men with a raised prostate specific-antigen (PSA) level and/or suspected prostate cancer (PCa) at digital rectal examinations (DRE). Of the 45 patients, 23 had PCa detected with core needle biopsy (CNB). All had 11C acetate PET/CT imaging. Ten of those 23 patients underwent radical prostatectomy (RP), of those ten patients, eight patients had MR spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) with 3 T and six had diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) with apparent diffusion coefficient calculation (MRI DWI ADC). CNB, PET/CT, 2D MRSI and ADC map results were compared with postoperative specimen histopathology.

Results

The sensitivity of CNB, PET/CT, MRSI and DWI ADC were 0.53, 0.55, 0.79 and 0.95, whereas the specificity of was 0.88, 0.87, 0.46 and 0.73, respectively.

Conclusion

MRI improves the PCa detection by defining the areas of interest for targeted CNB of the prostate and can reduce the number of biopsies required

National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-225428 (URN)10.2174/1876822901407010001 (DOI)
Available from: 2014-06-03 Created: 2014-06-03 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
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