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Rodriguez, Alina
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Publications (10 of 23) Show all publications
Forssman, L., Eninger, L., Tillman, C., Rodriguez, A. & Bohlin, G. (2012). Cognitive Functioning and Family Risk Factors in Relation to Symptom Behaviors of ADHD and ODD in Adolescents. Journal of Attention Disorders, 16(4), 284-294
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cognitive Functioning and Family Risk Factors in Relation to Symptom Behaviors of ADHD and ODD in Adolescents
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2012 (English)In: Journal of Attention Disorders, ISSN 1087-0547, E-ISSN 1557-1246, Vol. 16, no 4, p. 284-294Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: In this study, the authors investigated whether ADHD and oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) behaviors share associations with problems in cognitive functioning and/or family risk factors in adolescence. This was done by examining independent as well as specific associations of cognitive functioning and family risk factors with ADHD and ODD behaviors. Method: A sample of 120 adolescents from the general population was assessed on various cognitive tasks. ADHD and ODD behaviors were measured through parental and teacher ratings based on Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th edition) criteria. Parents and adolescents provided information regarding measures of family risk factors. Results: The results show that only cognitive functioning was associated with ADHD behaviors, and family risk factors were, independent of cognitive functioning, associated with ODD behaviors. Conclusion: These results suggest that cognitive performance bears a specific significance for ADHD behaviors, whereas family risk factors have specific importance for ODD behaviors.

Keywords
cognitive functioning, family risk factors, ADHD, oppositional defiant disorder
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-133431 (URN)10.1177/1087054710385065 (DOI)000302574300003 ()20978270 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2004-2279Riksbankens Jubileumsfond
Available from: 2010-11-10 Created: 2010-11-10 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved
Ali Khan, A., Rodriguez, A., Kaakinen, M., Pouta, A., Hartikainen, A.-L. & Järvelin, M.-R. (2011). Does in utero exposure to synthetic glucocorticoids influence birthweight, head circumference and birth length?: A systematic review of current evidence in humans. Paediatric and Perinatal Epidemiology, 25(1), 20-36
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Does in utero exposure to synthetic glucocorticoids influence birthweight, head circumference and birth length?: A systematic review of current evidence in humans
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2011 (English)In: Paediatric and Perinatal Epidemiology, ISSN 0269-5022, E-ISSN 1365-3016, Vol. 25, no 1, p. 20-36Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Synthetic glucocorticoids are the mainstay treatment for stimulating lung maturation in threatened preterm delivery. Animal studies suggest that in utero exposure to glucocorticoids leads to a reduction in birth size. Smaller birthweight has been associated with higher risk of many chronic diseases. Therefore, the authors undertook a systematic review of human studies examining the association between synthetic glucocorticoid treatment and birth size. Medline, EMBASE, PubMed, Cochrane, Google scholar and Institute of Life Science databases were searched for studies published between 1978 and 2009 investigating the association between synthetic glucocorticoids and birthweight, head circumference, birth length and ponderal index. All studies controlling for gestational age were examined. Seventeen studies were included in the analysis. Nine out of 17 studies reported a reduction in birthweight (range 12-332 g), five of nine a reduction of head circumference (range 0.31-1.02 cm) and two of four a reduction of 0.8 cm in birth length. Despite methodological inconsistencies and limitations that impede clear conclusions, the evidence suggests an association between in utero exposure to synthetic glucocorticoids and reduced birth size.

Keywords
birth length, birth ponderal index, birthweight, glucocorticoids, head circumference, prenatal
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-133285 (URN)10.1111/j.1365-3016.2010.01147.x (DOI)000285065900004 ()21133966 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2010-11-05 Created: 2010-11-05 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved
Obel, C., Olsen, J., Henriksen, T., Rodriguez, A., Järvelin, M., Moilannen, I., . . . Gissler, M. (2011). Is maternal smoking during pregnancy a risk factor for Hyperkinetic disorder?: Findings from a sibling design. International Journal of Epidemiology, 40(2), 338-345
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Is maternal smoking during pregnancy a risk factor for Hyperkinetic disorder?: Findings from a sibling design
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2011 (English)In: International Journal of Epidemiology, ISSN 0300-5771, E-ISSN 1464-3685, Vol. 40, no 2, p. 338-345Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background Studies have consistently shown that pregnancy smoking is associated with twice the risk of hyperactivity/inattention problems in the offspring. An association of this magnitude may indicate behavioural difficulties as one of the most important health effects related to smoking during pregnancy. However, social and genetic confounders may fully or partially account for these findings.

Methods A cohort including all singletons born in Finland from 1 January 1987 through 31 December 2001 was followed until 1 January 2006 based on linkage of national registers. Data were available for 97% (N = 868 449) of the population. We followed singleton children of smoking and non-smoking mothers until they had an International Classification of Diseases, 10th revision, diagnosis of hyperkinetic disorder (HKD) or to the end of the observation period. We used sibling-matched Cox regression analyses to control for social and genetic confounding.

Results We found a much smaller association between exposure to maternal smoking during pregnancy and risk of HKD in children using the sibling-matched analysis [hazards ratio (HR) = 1.20, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.97-1.49] than was observed in the entire cohort (HR 2.01, 95% CI 1.90-2.12).

Conclusions Our findings suggest that the strong association found in previous studies may be due to time-stable familial factors, such as environmental and genetic factors. If smoking is a causal factor, the effect is small and less important than what the previous studies indicate.

Keywords
Smoking, pregnancy, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, hyperkinetic disorder, sibling design
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-133282 (URN)10.1093/ije/dyq185 (DOI)000289165800012 ()21075808 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2010-11-05 Created: 2010-11-05 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved
Kelley, M., Rubens, C. & Rodriguez, A. (2010). Global report on preterm birth and stillbirth (6 of 7): erhical considerations. BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, 10, 6-6
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Global report on preterm birth and stillbirth (6 of 7): erhical considerations
2010 (English)In: BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, ISSN 1471-2393, E-ISSN 1471-2393, Vol. 10, p. 6-6Article in journal (Refereed) Published
National Category
Social Sciences Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-133286 (URN)10.1186/1471-2393-10-S1-S1 (DOI)
Available from: 2010-11-05 Created: 2010-11-05 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved
Rodriguez, A. (2010). Is prenatal exposure to maternal obesity linked to child mental health?. In: Debasis Bagchi (Ed.), Global Perspectives on Childhood Obesity: Current Status, Consequences and Prevention (pp. 157-166). Elsevier
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Is prenatal exposure to maternal obesity linked to child mental health?
2010 (English)In: Global Perspectives on Childhood Obesity: Current Status, Consequences and Prevention / [ed] Debasis Bagchi, Elsevier , 2010, p. 157-166Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2010
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-133281 (URN)978-0-12-374995-6 (ISBN)
Available from: 2010-11-05 Created: 2010-11-05 Last updated: 2010-12-10Bibliographically approved
Rodriguez, A. (2010). Maternal pre-pregnancy obesity and risk for inattention and negative emotionality in children. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry and Allied Disciplines, 51(2), 134-143
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Maternal pre-pregnancy obesity and risk for inattention and negative emotionality in children
2010 (English)In: Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry and Allied Disciplines, ISSN 0021-9630, E-ISSN 1469-7610, Vol. 51, no 2, p. 134-143Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective:

This study aimed to replicate and extend previous work showing an association between maternal pre-pregnancy adiposity and risk for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptoms in children.

Methods:

A Swedish population-based prospective pregnancy-offspring cohort was followed up when children were 5 years old (N = 1,714). Mothers and kindergarten teachers rated children's ADHD symptoms, presence and duration of problems, and emotionality. Dichotomized outcomes examined difficulties of clinical relevance (top 15% of the distribution). Analyses adjusted for pregnancy (maternal smoking, depressive symptoms, life events, education, age, family structure), birth outcomes (birth weight, gestational age, infant sex) and concurrent variables (family structure, maternal depressive symptoms, parental ADHD symptoms, and child overweight) in an attempt to rule out confounding.

Results:

Maternal pre-pregnancy overweight and obesity predicted high inattention symptom scores and obesity was associated with a two-fold increase in risk of difficulties with emotion intensity and emotion regulation according to teacher reports. Means of maternal ratings were unrelated to pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI). Presence and duration of problems were associated with both maternal over and underweight according to teachers.

Conclusions:

Despite discrepancies between maternal and teacher reports, these results provide further evidence that maternal pre-pregnancy overweight and obesity are associated with child inattention symptoms and extend previous work by establishing a link between obesity and emotional difficulties. Maternal adiposity at the time of conception may be instrumental in programming child mental health, as prenatal brain development depends on maternal energy supply. Possible mechanisms include disturbed maternal metabolic function. If maternal pre-pregnancy obesity is a causal risk factor, the potential for prevention is great.

National Category
Psychology Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-133290 (URN)10.1111/j.1469-7610.2009.02133.x (DOI)000273310800003 ()
Available from: 2010-11-05 Created: 2010-11-05 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved
Rodriguez, A., Kaakinen, M., Moilanen, I., Taanila, A., McGough, J., Loo, S. & Järvelin, R. (2010). Mixed-handedness is linked to mental health problems in children and adolescents. Pediatrics, 125(2), E340-E348
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mixed-handedness is linked to mental health problems in children and adolescents
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2010 (English)In: Pediatrics, ISSN 0031-4005, E-ISSN 1098-4275, Vol. 125, no 2, p. E340-E348Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE: Problems with language and symptoms of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in childhood and adolescence are often strongly linked to low scholastic performance. Early recognition of children who are at increased risk is necessary. Our objective was to determine whether mixed-handedness, which is associated with atypical cerebral laterality, is associated with language, scholastic, and ADHD symptoms in childhood and adolescence.

METHODS: Prospective data come from the Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1986, a longitudinal, population-based birth cohort with assessments when children were 7 to 8 and 16 years of age (N = 7871). Teacher, parent, and/or adolescent reports were used to assess language difficulties, scholastic performance, and mental health, including ADHD symptoms.

RESULTS: Mixed-handed children, relative to right-handed, had approximately a twofold increase in odds of having difficulties with language and scholastic performance at the age of 8 years. Eight years later, as 16-year-olds, adolescents had twofold increase in odds concerning difficulties in school with language and with ADHD symptoms. Mixed-handed children were more likely to have scores indicating probable psychiatric disturbance, including ADHD symptoms. As adolescents, mixed-handed children with previous behavioral problems were at considerably higher risk for scoring within the range of probable ADHD-inattention or ADHD-combined case. Mixed-handedness was associated with greater symptom severity in children and adolescents (P = .01) concerning psychiatric disturbance and ADHD inattention but not ADHD hyperactivity.

CONCLUSIONS: The results indicate that mixed-handed children have a greater likelihood of having language, scholastic, and mental health problems in childhood and that these persist into adolescence. Thus, these results suggest that mixed-handedness, particularly in the presence of difficulties, could aid in the recognition of children who are at risk for stable problems. Additional research is needed to understand the connections between neural substrates related to atypical cerebral asymmetry, mixed-handedness, and mental health problems including ADHD symptoms.

National Category
Psychology Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-133289 (URN)10.1542/peds.2009-1165 (DOI)000275942900049 ()
Available from: 2010-11-05 Created: 2010-11-05 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved
Rodriguez, A. & Järvelin, M. (2009). Is prenatal alcohol exposure related to inattention and hyperactivity symptoms in children?: Disentangling the effects of social adversity. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry and Allied Disciplines, 50(9), 1073-1083
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Is prenatal alcohol exposure related to inattention and hyperactivity symptoms in children?: Disentangling the effects of social adversity
2009 (English)In: Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry and Allied Disciplines, ISSN 0021-9630, E-ISSN 1469-7610, Vol. 50, no 9, p. 1073-1083Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Studies concerning whether exposure to low levels of maternal alcohol consumption during fetal development is related to child inattention and hyperactivity symptoms have shown conflicting results. We examine the contribution of covariates related to social adversity to resolve some inconsistencies in the extant research by conducting parallel analyses of three cohorts with varying alcohol consumption and attitudes towards alcohol use.Methods:  We compare three population-based pregnancy2013offspring cohorts within the Nordic Network on ADHD from Denmark and Finland. Prenatal data were gathered via self-report during pregnancy and birth outcomes were abstracted from medical charts. A total of 21,678 reports concerning inattention and hyperactivity symptoms in children were available from the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire or the Rutter Scale completed by parents and/or teachers.Results:  Drinking patterns differed cross-nationally. Women who had at least some social adversity (young, low education, or being single) were more likely to drink than those better off in the Finnish cohort, but the opposite was true for the Danish cohorts. Prenatal alcohol exposure was not related to risk for a high inattention-hyperactivity symptom score in children across cohorts after adjustment for covariates. In contrast, maternal smoking and social adversity during pregnancy were independently and consistently associated with an increase in risk of child symptoms.Conclusions:  Low doses of alcohol consumption during pregnancy were not related to child inattention/hyperactivity symptoms once social adversity and smoking were taken into account.

Keywords
ADHD, alcohol, inattention/hyperactivity symptoms, prenatal, social factors, behavior problems, cross-cultural, longitudinal studies
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-98684 (URN)10.1111/j.1469-7610.2009.02071.x (DOI)000269264800005 ()19298478 (PubMedID)
Note
Published Online: 27 Feb 2009Available from: 2009-07-31 Created: 2009-03-02 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved
Obel, C., Linnet, K. M., Henriksen, T. B., Rodriguez, A., Järvelin, M. R., Kotimaa, A., . . . Olsen, J. (2009). Smoking during pregnancy and hyperactivity-inattention in the offspring—comparing results from three Nordic cohorts. International Journal of Epidemiology, 38(3), 698-705
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Smoking during pregnancy and hyperactivity-inattention in the offspring—comparing results from three Nordic cohorts
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2009 (English)In: International Journal of Epidemiology, ISSN 0300-5771, E-ISSN 1464-3685, Vol. 38, no 3, p. 698-705Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background Prenatal exposure to smoking has been associated with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) in a number of epidemiological studies. However, mothers with the ADHD phenotype may ‘treat’ their problem by smoking and therefore be more likely to smoke even in a society where smoking is not acceptable. This will cause genetic confounding if ADHD has a heritable component, especially in populations with low prevalence rates of smoking since this reason for smoking is expected to be proportionally more frequent in a population with few ‘normal’ smokers. We compared the association in cohorts with different smoking frequencies.

Methods A total of 20 936 women with singleton pregnancies were identified within three population-based pregnancy cohorts in Northern Finland (1985–1986) and in Denmark (1984–1987 and 1989–1991). We collected self-reported data on their pre-pregnancy and pregnancy smoking habits and followed the children to school age where teachers and parents rated hyperactivity and inattention symptoms.

Results Children, whose mothers smoked during pregnancy, had an increased prevalence of a high hyperactivity-inattention score compared with children of nonsmokers in each of the cohorts after adjustment for confounders but we found no statistical significant difference between the associations across the cohorts.

Conclusion The estimated association was not strongest in the population with the fewest smokers which does not support the hypothesis that the association is entirely due to genetic confounding.

Keywords
smoking, confounding, prenatal, child behaviour, ADHD
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-15392 (URN)10.1093/ije/dym290 (DOI)000268810100016 ()18250076 (PubMedID)
Note
IJE Advance Access originally published online on February 2, 2008 Available from: 2008-02-11 Created: 2008-02-11 Last updated: 2017-12-08Bibliographically approved
Rodriguez, A. & Waldenström, U. (2008). Fetal origins of non-right-handedness and child mental health. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry and Allied Disciplines, 49(9), 967-976
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Fetal origins of non-right-handedness and child mental health
2008 (English)In: Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry and Allied Disciplines, ISSN 0021-9630, E-ISSN 1469-7610, Vol. 49, no 9, p. 967-976Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Environmental risk during fetal development for non-right-handedness, an index of brain asymmetry, and its relevance for child mental health is not fully understood. Methods: A Swedish population-based prospective pregnancy-offspring cohort was followed-up when children were five years old (N = 1714). Prenatal environmental risk exposures were the number of ultrasound examinations and maternal distress during pregnancy. Child mental health, including symptoms of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), language difficulties, and care-seeking for child behavior problems, was assessed via maternal and/or kindergarten teacher's ratings. Results: Prenatal exposure to maternal depressive symptoms and critical life events were associated with increased risk of child non-right-handedness and mixed handedness, after adjustment for parity, maternal age, birth outcomes, infant sex, and parental handedness. No association was found between handedness and number of ultrasound examinations. Non-right and mixed-handedness, rather than left-handedness, were associated with increased risk of language difficulties and particularly with ADHD symptoms, after adjustment for current parental ADHD symptoms, current maternal depressive symptoms, birth outcomes, smoking during pregnancy, depressive symptoms and critical life events. Problems were significant enough to prompt mothers to seek care for children's behavioral problems, and parents were more likely to have received advice from the children's kindergarten teachers to seek care. Conclusions: This study suggests that mixed-handedness, i.e., reflecting atypical brain laterality, can be a marker of both severity of prenatal exposure to maternal distress and of increased risk of ADHD symptoms in childhood. Our results support the idea that the fetal environment plays a role in subsequent child mental health.

Keywords
ADHD, atypical laterality, child mental health, Handedness, Language difficulties, Prenatal
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-17211 (URN)10.1111/j.1469-7610.2008.01923.x (DOI)000258782900009 ()18564067 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2008-08-27 Created: 2008-08-27 Last updated: 2017-12-08Bibliographically approved
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