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Rosander, Kerstin
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Publications (10 of 21) Show all publications
Hreinsdottir, J., Kaul, Y. F., Hellström-Westas, L., Rosander, K., von Hofsten, C. & Holmström, G. (2018). Impaired cognitive ability at 2.5 years predicts later visual and ophthalmological problems in children born very preterm. Acta Paediatrica, 107(5), 822-830
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Impaired cognitive ability at 2.5 years predicts later visual and ophthalmological problems in children born very preterm
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2018 (English)In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 107, no 5, p. 822-830Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim: To identify possible predictive factors for visual problems at 6.5 years in children born very preterm.

Methods: During 2004–2007, all very preterm infants (gestational age [GA] <32 weeks) in Uppsala County, Sweden were screened for retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) neonatally; at four months, visual tracking was tested; at 2.5 years, visuospatial and cognitive tests were carried out. At 6.5 years, 84 preterm children and a reference group of 64 full‐term children underwent ophthalmological testing.

Results: Mean visual acuity (VA) did not differ between the groups, but subnormal VA (≤0.8) was more common in the preterm group (31% vs 14%; p < 0.05). More often than full‐term children, preterm children had impaired contrast sensitivity (<0.5) (36% vs 19%; p < 0.05) and strabismus (8% vs 0%; p < 0.05). Low GA, ROP, intraventricular haemorrhage 3‐4/periventricular leukomalacia and cognitive disability at 2.5 years predicted ophthalmological and visual problems at 6.5 years. Visual tracking ability at four months was not predictive of ophthalmological outcome.

Conclusion: Children born preterm had more ophthalmological problems at 6.5 years of age, including subtle dysfunctions. ROP, early brain injury and impaired cognitive function around 2.5 years predicted later ophthalmological dysfunctions.

Keywords
Cognition, Long term, Risk factor, Very preterm, Visual outcome
National Category
Ophthalmology Pediatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-348648 (URN)10.1111/apa.14209 (DOI)000430115100016 ()29288532 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-04-16 Created: 2018-04-16 Last updated: 2018-06-19Bibliographically approved
von Hofsten, C. & Rosander, K. (2018). The Development of Sensorimotor Intelligence in Infants. In: Plumert, J M (Ed.), Studying The Perception-Action System As A Model System For Understanding Development: (pp. 73-106). Elsevier
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Development of Sensorimotor Intelligence in Infants
2018 (English)In: Studying The Perception-Action System As A Model System For Understanding Development / [ed] Plumert, J M, Elsevier, 2018, p. 73-106Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Infancy is the most dynamic part of human development. During this period, all basic sensorimotor and cognitive abilities are established. In this chapter, we will trace some of the important achievements of this development with a focus on how infants achieve predictive control of actions, i.e., how they come to coordinate their behavior with the ongoing events in the world without lagging behind. With the maturation of the brain, new possibilities that have profound effects on cognition open up. Some of them are core abilities, i.e., they function at birth or very early in development. Important examples are the structured perception of objects and surfaces and the control of arm movements. Closely after birth, infants move their arms to the vicinity of objects in front of them demonstrating that they have some control of their arms and indicating that they perceive objects as such. Another example is the rapid onset of smooth-pursuit eye movements during the second month of life and the emerging ability to predict when and where an occluded moving object will reappear. At 4 months of age, out of sight is no longer of mind. The child's sensorimotor system is especially designed to facilitate the extraction of knowledge about the world including other people. In addition, the infant is endowed with motives that ensure that the innate predispositions are transformed into a system of knowledge for guiding actions predictively. By perceiving and acting on the world, infants develop their cognition and through developmental studies; we can learn more about these processes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Series
Advances in Child Development and Behavior, ISSN 0065-2407 ; 55
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-373087 (URN)10.1016/bs.acdb.2018.04.003 (DOI)000453660300004 ()30031439 (PubMedID)978-0-12-814763-4 (ISBN)
Available from: 2019-01-11 Created: 2019-01-11 Last updated: 2019-01-11Bibliographically approved
Stapel, J., Rosander, K. & von Hofsten, C. (2016). Infants' Use of Multisensory Information for Postural Control. In: 2016 Joint IEEE International Conference on Development and Learning and Epigenetic Robotics (ICDL-EpiRob): . Paper presented at IEEE Joint International Conference on Development and Learning and Epigenetic Robotics (ICDL-EpiRob), SEP 19-22, 2016, Paris, FRANCE (pp. 202-203). New York: IEEE
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Infants' Use of Multisensory Information for Postural Control
2016 (English)In: 2016 Joint IEEE International Conference on Development and Learning and Epigenetic Robotics (ICDL-EpiRob), New York: IEEE, 2016, p. 202-203Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York: IEEE, 2016
National Category
Psychology Robotics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-331391 (URN)10.1109/DEVLRN.2016.7846819 (DOI)000401474000042 ()978-1-5090-5069-7 (ISBN)
Conference
IEEE Joint International Conference on Development and Learning and Epigenetic Robotics (ICDL-EpiRob), SEP 19-22, 2016, Paris, FRANCE
Available from: 2017-10-13 Created: 2017-10-13 Last updated: 2018-04-04Bibliographically approved
Kaul, Y. F., Rosander, K., Hofsten, von, C., Brodd, K. S., Holmström, G., Kaul, A., . . . Hellström-Westas, L. (2016). Visual tracking in very preterm infants at 4 months predicts neurodevelopment at 3 years of age. Pediatric Research, 80(1), 35-42
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Visual tracking in very preterm infants at 4 months predicts neurodevelopment at 3 years of age
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2016 (English)In: Pediatric Research, ISSN 0031-3998, E-ISSN 1530-0447, Vol. 80, no 1, p. 35-42Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Typically developing infants track moving objects with eye and head movements in a smooth and predictive way at 4 mo of age, but this ability is delayed in very preterm infants. We hypothesized that visual tracking ability in very preterm infants predicts later neurodevelopment. METHOD: In 67 very preterm infants (gestational age<32wk), eye and head movements were assessed at 4 mo corrected age while the infant tracked a moving object. Gaze gain, smooth pursuit, head movements, and timing of gaze relative the object were analyzed off line. Results of the five subscales included in the Bayley Scales of Infant Development (BSID-III) at 3 y of age were evaluated in relation to the visual tracking data and to perinatal risk factors. RESULTS: Significant correlations were obtained between gaze gain and cognition, receptive and expressive language, and fine motor function, respectively, also after controlling for gestational age, severe brain damage, retinopathy of prematurity, and bronchopulmonary dysplasia. CONCLUSION: This is the first study demonstrating that the basic ability to visually track a moving object at 4 mo robustly predicts neurodevelopment at 3 y of age in children born very preterm.

National Category
Psychology Pediatrics Ophthalmology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-284105 (URN)10.1038/pr.2016.37 (DOI)000379377900006 ()27027722 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-04-15 Created: 2016-04-15 Last updated: 2017-11-30
Righetti, L., Nylén, A., Rosander, K. & Iispeert, A. J. (2015). Kinematic and gait similarities between crawling human infants and other quadruped mammals. Frontiers in Neurology, 6, Article ID UNSP 17.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Kinematic and gait similarities between crawling human infants and other quadruped mammals
2015 (English)In: Frontiers in Neurology, ISSN 1664-2295, E-ISSN 1664-2295, Vol. 6, article id UNSP 17Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Crawling on hands and knees is an early pattern of human infant locomotion, which offers an interesting way of studying quadrupedalism in one of its simplest form. We investigate how crawling human infants compare to other quadruped mammals, especially primates. We present quantitative data on both the gait and kinematics of seven 10-month-old crawling infants. Body movements were measured with an optoelectronic system giving precise data on 3-dimensional limb movements. Crawling on hands and knees is very similar to the locomotion of non-human primates in terms of the quite protracted arm at touch-down, the coordination between the spine movements in the lateral plane and the limbs, the relatively extended limbs during locomotion and the strong correlation between stance duration and speed of locomotion. However, there are important differences compared to primates, such as the choice of a lateral-sequence walking gait, which is similar to most non-primate mammals and the relatively stiff elbows during stance as opposed to the quite compliant gaits of primates. These finding raise the question of the role of both the mechanical structure of the body and neural control on the determination of these characteristics.

Keywords
infant locomotion, crawling, gait, kinematics, quadruped locomotion
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-267690 (URN)10.3389/fneur.2015.00017 (DOI)000363756700002 ()25709597 (PubMedID)
Funder
EU, European Research Council, IST-2004-004370Max Planck Society
Available from: 2015-11-25 Created: 2015-11-25 Last updated: 2017-12-01Bibliographically approved
Cunha, A. B., Soares, D. d., Carvalho, R. d., Rosander, K., von Hofsten, C. & Tudella, E. (2015). Maturational and situational determinants of reaching at its onset. Infant Behavior and Development, 41, 64-72
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Maturational and situational determinants of reaching at its onset
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2015 (English)In: Infant Behavior and Development, ISSN 0163-6383, E-ISSN 1879-0453, Vol. 41, p. 64-72Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

At 3 months of age, reaching behavior was measured in a group of 10 girls and 10 boys born at term. The assessments were carried out on the average 2 days after reaching onset. Reaching kinematics was measured in both supine and reclined positions. Girls reached more than boys, had straighter reaching trajectories and movements of shorter durations as well as fewer movement units. The reclined position gave rise to straighter trajectories in both girls and boys. Several anthropometric parameters were measured. Girls had less length and volume of the forearm than boys but similar upper arm volumes. There was a weak relation between kinematic and anthropometric variables.

Keywords
Reaching, Gender, Infant, Motor development
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-270631 (URN)10.1016/j.infbeh.2015.06.003 (DOI)000365375100008 ()26311469 (PubMedID)
Funder
EU, European Research Council, StG12-312292-CACTUS
Available from: 2016-01-01 Created: 2016-01-01 Last updated: 2017-05-11Bibliographically approved
Hofsten, von, C. & Rosander, K. (2015). On the development of the mirror neuron system. In: G. Rizolatti and P. Ferrari (eds) (Ed.), New Frontiers in Mirror Neuron Research: (pp. 270-320). Oxford University Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>On the development of the mirror neuron system
2015 (English)In: New Frontiers in Mirror Neuron Research / [ed] G. Rizolatti and P. Ferrari (eds), Oxford University Press, 2015, p. 270-320Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2015
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-284104 (URN)
Available from: 2016-04-15 Created: 2016-04-15 Last updated: 2016-04-15
Ekberg, T. L., Rosander, K., von Hofsten, C., Olsson, U., Soska, K. C. & Adolph, K. E. (2013). Dynamic reaching in infants during binocular and monocular viewing. Experimental Brain Research, 229(1), 1-12
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Dynamic reaching in infants during binocular and monocular viewing
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2013 (English)In: Experimental Brain Research, ISSN 0014-4819, E-ISSN 1432-1106, Vol. 229, no 1, p. 1-12Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study examined reaching in 6-, 8-, and 10-month-olds during binocular and monocular viewing in a dynamic reaching situation. Infants were rotated toward a flat vertical board and reached for objects at one of seven positions along a horizontal line at shoulder height. Hand selection, time to contact the object, and reaching accuracy were examined in both viewing conditions. Hand selection was strongly dependent on object location, not on infants' age or whether one eye was covered. Monocular viewing and age did, however, affect time to object contact and contact errors: Infants showed longer contact times when one eye was covered, and 6-month-olds made more contact errors in the monocular condition. For right-hand selection, contact times were longer when the covered right eye was leading during the chair rotation. For left-hand selection, there were no differences in contact time due to whether the covered eye was leading during rotation.

Keywords
Reaching, Monocular-binocular, Infants, Prospective control
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-206570 (URN)10.1007/s00221-013-3588-z (DOI)000322171500001 ()
Available from: 2013-09-02 Created: 2013-09-02 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Brodd, K. S., Grönqvist, H., Holmström, G., Grönqvist, E., Rosander, K. & Ewald, U. (2012). Development of Smooth Pursuit Eye Movements in very preterm born infants: 3. Association to perinatal risk factors. Acta Paediatrica, 101(2), 164-171
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Development of Smooth Pursuit Eye Movements in very preterm born infants: 3. Association to perinatal risk factors
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2012 (English)In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 101, no 2, p. 164-171Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim:  To investigate the association between perinatal risk factors and neonatal complications and early oculo-motor development in very preterm infants.

Methods:  Perinatal risk factors were identified, and the potential association with early oculo-motor development was evaluated by measuring smooth pursuit eye movements (SP) at 2 and 4 months' corrected age (CA) in a population of very preterm infants born in Uppsala County 2004-2007 (n = 113).

Results:  Among the 15 tested factors, eight showed significant association in univariate analysis with lower levels of SP at 4 months' CA, namely administration of prenatal corticosteroids, gestational age, birthweight, bronchopulmonary dysplasia, retinopathy of prematurity, periventricular leukomalacia, intraventricular haemorrhage >grade 2, and persistent ductus arteriosus. At 2 months' CA, only retinopathy of prematurity >stage 2 was associated with lower levels of SP. When all factors significant in the univariate tests were included in multiple regressions aimed to assess each factor's independent relation to SP, periventricular leukomalacia was the only significant independent factor. When adding 2-5 of the significant factors using multiple regression analysis, the levels of SP became lower.

Conclusion:  Perinatal risk factors were associated with lower levels of SP. This could be interpreted as delayed or disturbed development of normal oculomotor ability.

National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-155199 (URN)10.1111/j.1651-2227.2011.02449.x (DOI)000298914000021 ()21883450 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2011-06-20 Created: 2011-06-20 Last updated: 2017-12-11Bibliographically approved
von Hofsten, C. & Rosander, K. (2012). Perception-action in children with ASD. Frontiers in Integrative Neuroscience (NOV)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Perception-action in children with ASD
2012 (English)In: Frontiers in Integrative Neuroscience, ISSN 1662-5145, E-ISSN 1662-5145, no NOVArticle, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

How do disturbances to perception and action relate to the deficiencies expressed by children with autism? The ability to predict what is going to happen next is crucial for the construction of all actions and children develop these predictive abilities early in development. Children with autism, however, are deficient in the ability to foresee future events and to plan movements and movement sequences. They are also deficient in the understanding of other people's actions. This includes communicative actions as they are ultimately based on movements. Today there are two promising neurobiological interpretation of ASD. First, there is strong evidence that the Mirror Neuron System (MNS) is impaired. As stated by this hypothesis, action production and action understanding are intimately related. Both these functions rely on predictive models of the sensory consequences of actions and depend on connectivity between the parietal and pre-motor areas. Secondly, action prediction is accomplished through a system that includes a loop from the posterior parietal cortex through the cerebellum and back to the premotor and motor areas of the brain. Impairment of this loop is probably also part of the explanation of the prediction problems in children with ASD. Both the cortico-cerebellar loop and the MNS rely on distant neural connections. There are multiple evidence that such connections are weak in children with autism.

Keywords
Action, Anticipation, Autism, Diffuse tensor imaging, Mirror-neurons, Perception, Planning, apraxia, article, behavior disorder, cerebellum, child development, hearing impairment, human, mirror neuron, motor cortex, motor dysfunction, movement perception, neuroscience, perception disorder, posterior parietal cortex, prediction, premotor cortex, psychomotor disorder, visual impairment
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-193783 (URN)10.3389/fnint.2012.00115 (DOI)
Available from: 2013-02-06 Created: 2013-02-06 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
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