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Ghaderi, Ata
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Publications (10 of 34) Show all publications
Ljungman, L., Cernvall, M., Ghaderi, A., Ljungman, G., von Essen, L. & Ljótsson, B. (2018). An open trial of individualized face-to-face cognitive behavior therapy for psychological distress in parents of children after end of treatment for childhood cancer including a cognitive behavioral conceptualization. PeerJ, 6, Article ID e4570.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>An open trial of individualized face-to-face cognitive behavior therapy for psychological distress in parents of children after end of treatment for childhood cancer including a cognitive behavioral conceptualization
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2018 (English)In: PeerJ, ISSN 2167-8359, E-ISSN 2167-8359, Vol. 6, article id e4570Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective

A subgroup of parents of children who have been treated for childhood cancer report high levels of psychological distress. To date there is no empirically supported psychological treatment targeting cancer-related psychological distress in this population. The aim of the current study was to test the feasibility and preliminarily evaluate the effect of individualized face-to-face cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) for parents of children after the end of treatment for childhood cancer. A secondary aim was to present a cognitive behavioral conceptualization of cancer-related distress for these parents.

Methods

An open trial was conducted where 15 parents of children who had completed successful treatment for cancer three months to five years earlier and who reported psychological distress related to a child’s previous cancer disease were provided CBT at a maximum of 15 sessions. Participants were assessed at baseline, post-intervention, and three-month follow-up using self-reported psychological distress (including posttraumatic stress symptoms (PTSS), depression, and anxiety) and the diagnostic Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview. Feasibility outcomes relating to recruitment, data collection, and delivery of the treatment were also examined. Individual case formulations for each participant guided the intervention and these were aggregated and presented in a conceptualization detailing core symptoms and their suggested maintenance mechanisms.

Results

A total of 93% of the participants completed the treatment and all of them completed the follow-up assessment. From baseline to post-assessment, parents reported significant improvements in PTSS, depression, and anxiety with medium to large effect sizes (Cohen’s d = 0.65–0.92). Results were maintained or improved at a three-month follow-up. At baseline, seven (47%) participants fulfilled the diagnostic criteria for major depressive disorder and four (29%) fulfilled the criteria for posttraumatic stress disorder, compared to none at a post-assessment and a follow-up assessment. The resulting cognitive behavioral conceptualization suggests traumatic stress and depression as the core features of distress, and avoidance and inactivity is suggested as the core maintenance mechanisms.

Conclusion

The treatment was feasible and acceptable to the participants. Significant improvements in distress were observed during the study. Overall, results suggest that the psychological treatment for parents of children after end of treatment for childhood cancer used in the current study is promising and should be tested and evaluated in future studies.

National Category
Cancer and Oncology Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-349407 (URN)10.7717/peerj.4570 (DOI)000429852600001 ()29666751 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, VR521-2010-3042; VR521-2014-3337Swedish Cancer Society, CAN2013/580;CAN2014/613
Available from: 2018-04-26 Created: 2018-04-26 Last updated: 2018-06-19Bibliographically approved
Parling, T., Cernvall, M., Ramklint, M., Holmgren, S. & Ghaderi, A. (2016). A randomised trial of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy for Anorexia Nervosa after daycare treatment, including five-year follow-up. BMC Psychiatry, 16, Article ID 272.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A randomised trial of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy for Anorexia Nervosa after daycare treatment, including five-year follow-up
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2016 (English)In: BMC Psychiatry, ISSN 1471-244X, E-ISSN 1471-244X, Vol. 16, article id 272Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: No specific psychotherapy for adult anorexia nervosa (AN) has shown superior effect. Maintenance factors in AN (over-evaluation of control over eating, weight and shape) were addressed via Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT). The study aimed to compare 19 sessions of ACT with treatment as usual (TAU), after 9 to 12weeks of daycare, regarding recovery and risk of relapse up to five years. METHODS: Patients with a full, sub-threshold or partial AN diagnosis from an adult eating disorder unit at a hospital were randomized to ACT (n=24) and TAU (n=19). The staff at the hospital, as well as the participants, were unaware of the allocation until the last week of daycare. Primary outcome measures were body mass index (BMI) and specific eating psychopathology. Analyses included mixed model repeated measures and odds ratios. RESULTS: Groups did not differ regarding recovery and relapse using a metric of BMI and the Eating Disorder Examination Questionnaire (EDE-Q). There were only significant time effects. However, odds ratio indicated that ACT participants were more likely to reach good outcome. The study was underpowered due to unexpected low inflow of patients and high attrition. CONCLUSION: Longer treatment, more focus on established perpetuating factors and weight restoration integrated with ACT might improve outcome. Potential pitfalls regarding future trials on AN are discussed. Trial registration number ISRCTN 12106530. Retrospectively registered 08/06/2016.

Keywords
Anorexia Nervosa, sub-threshold Anorexia Nervosa, Acceptance and Commitment Therapy, Eating Disorders
National Category
Psychology Psychiatry
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-156526 (URN)10.1186/s12888-016-0975-6 (DOI)000382223600003 ()27473046 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council
Available from: 2011-07-29 Created: 2011-07-29 Last updated: 2017-12-08Bibliographically approved
Bohman, B., Eriksson, M., Lind, M., Ghaderi, A., Forsberg, L. & Rasmussen, F. (2013). Infrequent attention to dietary and physical activity behaviours in conversations in Swedish child health services. Acta Paediatrica, 102(5), 520-524
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Infrequent attention to dietary and physical activity behaviours in conversations in Swedish child health services
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2013 (English)In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 102, no 5, p. 520-524Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim To investigate conversations between nurses and parents in Swedish child health services and to assess to what extent attention is directed towards dietary and physical activity behaviours in children. Methods Twenty-three nurses audio-recorded one session each. Recordings were assessed and topics were classified according to predetermined categories. Results The three most frequent topics of conversation concerned physical examinations of the child (30% of session time), talking to the child to establish or maintain contact and interest (15%), and development of language skills (12%). Dietary habits came on fourth place (10%), and physical activity ranked 14 (4%). Conclusion Attention to dietary and physical activity behaviours in children is infrequent in Swedish child health services. Concern is raised about the efficacy of prevention efforts against childhood obesity.

Keywords
Child health services, Dietary intake, Physical activity
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-200038 (URN)10.1111/apa.12176 (DOI)000317361400028 ()
Available from: 2013-05-23 Created: 2013-05-20 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Bohman, B., Ghaderi, A. & Rasmussen, F. (2013). Psychometric Properties of a New Measure of Parental Self-Efficacy for Promoting Healthy Physical Activity and Dietary Behaviors in Children. European Journal of Psychological Assessment, 29(4), 291-298
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Psychometric Properties of a New Measure of Parental Self-Efficacy for Promoting Healthy Physical Activity and Dietary Behaviors in Children
2013 (English)In: European Journal of Psychological Assessment, ISSN 1015-5759, E-ISSN 2151-2426, Vol. 29, no 4, p. 291-298Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

There is a lack of validated measures of parental self-efficacy (PSE) covering both physical activity and dietary behaviors in children which can be used to prevent childhood obesity. This study developed a new measure of PSE for promoting healthy physical activity and dietary behaviors in children and assessed its psychometric properties. Participants were mothers (n = 2,232) with 3-year-old first-born children living in Stockholm, Sweden. The mothers responded to questionnaires measuring PSE, locus of control, and self-esteem. Exploratory factor analysis yielded a three-factor structure, interpreted as PSE for promoting healthy dietary behaviors in children (Factor 1), PSE for limit-setting of unhealthy dietary or physical activity behaviors in children (Factor 2), and PSE for promoting healthy physical activity behaviors in children (Factor 3). The factor model was supported by confirmatory factor analysis. The internal consistency and test-retest reliability of the new PSE measure were high; discriminant validity was adequate. The Parental Self-Efficacy for Promoting Healthy Physical Activity and Dietary Behaviors in Children Scale (PSEPAD) shows promise as a valuable instrument in childhood obesity prevention.

Keywords
parental self-efficacy, dietary habits, physical activity, childhood obesity prevention
National Category
Psychology Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-211476 (URN)10.1027/1015-5759/a000159 (DOI)000326165900008 ()
Available from: 2013-11-25 Created: 2013-11-25 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Alfonsson, S., Parling, T. & Ghaderi, A. (2013). Self-€reported symptoms of adult attention deficit hyperactivity disorder among obese patients seeking bariatric surgery and its relation to alcohol consumption, disordered eating and gender. Clinical Obesity, 3(5), 124-131
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Self-€reported symptoms of adult attention deficit hyperactivity disorder among obese patients seeking bariatric surgery and its relation to alcohol consumption, disordered eating and gender
2013 (English)In: Clinical Obesity, ISSN 1758-8103, E-ISSN 1758-8111, Vol. 3, no 5, p. 124-131Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

What is already known about this subject

  • Symptoms of adult attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are common among people with obesity.
  • Symptoms of ADHD are associated with other impulsive behaviours.
  • Impulsivity can manifest differently in women and men.

What this study adds

  • The prevalence of ADHD symptoms was equal in both sexes in this patient group.
  • ADHD symptoms were associated with hazardous alcohol consumption in men but not in women.
  • It may be important to investigate several comorbid conditions simultaneously instead of a single diagnosis.

Eating disorders and adult attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), both characterized by deficits in impulse control, are common among bariatric surgery patients. Previous studies in other groups have found gender differences in how symptoms of ADHD and eating disorders manifest as women show more disordered eating and men show more risk consumption of alcohol. In the present study, the association between symptoms of adult ADHD, eating disorders and hazardous alcohol consumption was investigated, while considering gender differences. Self-report questionnaires were obtained from 276 bariatric surgery patients 3–6 months before surgery. The prevalence rates of adult ADHD and binge eating disorder (BED) were 8.6% and 6.3%, respectively, with no evidence of gender difference in the prevalence rates. Hazardous alcohol consumption was reported by a significantly larger portion of men (16.9%) than women (8.6%). There was an association between adult ADHD and both BED and hazardous alcohol consumption. However, symptoms of adult ADHD were associated with hazardous alcohol consumption in men but not in women. Our results suggest gender differences in hazardous alcohol consumption and self-reported symptoms of disordered eating despite similar prevalence rate of BED, but no gender difference in symptoms of adult ADHD. Finally, as the associations between these variables seem to be different in women and men, future

Keywords
Adult ADHD, alcohol, bariatric surgery, eating disorder
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-207788 (URN)10.1111/cob.12025 (DOI)
Available from: 2013-09-19 Created: 2013-09-19 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Hogstrom, J., Enebrink, P. & Ghaderi, A. (2013). The Moderating Role of Child Callous-Unemotional Traits in an Internet-Based Parent-Management Training Program. Journal of family psychology, 27(2), 314-323
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Moderating Role of Child Callous-Unemotional Traits in an Internet-Based Parent-Management Training Program
2013 (English)In: Journal of family psychology, ISSN 0893-3200, E-ISSN 1939-1293, Vol. 27, no 2, p. 314-323Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Although parent management training (PMT) is generally considered the treatment of choice for children with conduct problems, some specific adaptations might be essential for various subgroups of parents or children to benefit well from PMT. The aim of this study was to examine the influence of child callous-unemotional (CU) traits on the outcome of an Internet-based PMT program for parents of children with conduct problems (n = 57; mean age 6.65). Within a randomized controlled trial of PMT, children assigned to the intervention group were categorized and compared as either "high-CU" (n = 8) or "low-CU" (n = 49) based on a cut-off score on the CU subscale of the Antisocial Process Screening Device (APSD; Frick & Hare, 2001). CU traits in children were associated with more severe conduct problems at baseline, as well as more hyperactivity and peer-related problems. Treatment outcome, in terms of conduct-problem reduction, was poor in the high-CU group compared with the low-CU group, despite the fact that parents in both groups improved equally in parenting skills. The same pattern of results emerged after controlling for initial difficulties of conduct problems and other pretreatment differences between the groups. Elevated levels of CU traits in children seem to contribute to an inferior treatment response in PMT. These findings call for more attention on empathy and emotional patterns in the assessment of children with conduct problems.

Keywords
callous-unemotional traits, conduct problems, moderators, parent management training, empathy
National Category
Psychology Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-199457 (URN)10.1037/a0031883 (DOI)000316911100015 ()
Available from: 2013-05-08 Created: 2013-05-06 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Westerberg-Jacobson, J., Ghaderi, A. & Edlund, B. (2012). A longitudinal study of motives for wishing to be thinner and weight-control practices in 7-to 18-year-old Swedish girls. European eating disorders review, 20(4), 294-302
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A longitudinal study of motives for wishing to be thinner and weight-control practices in 7-to 18-year-old Swedish girls
2012 (English)In: European eating disorders review, ISSN 1072-4133, E-ISSN 1099-0968, Vol. 20, no 4, p. 294-302Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The main aim of this seven-year longitudinal study, of 411 Swedish pre-adolescent girls, (aged 7–11 years, Year 1) was to examine a wish to be thinner, dieting attempts, described motives for wishing to be thinner, and weight-control practices. A further aim was to examine to what extent BMI accounted for motives for wishing to be thinner and weight control practices. A wish to be thinner and dieting attempts increased significantly with increasing age between the ages of 9 and18. The most frequently reported motive for wishing to be thinner was to “feel better about yourself”. Categories that emerged from the qualitative analysis of self-described motives for the wish to be thinner were for example to “correspond to the societal ideal” and to “wear particular clothes”. A majority of the girls adopted weight control practices that would be considered as healthy, but extreme weight control practices increased with age. Girls with BMIs over the 75th percentile reported a greater number of motives for wishing to be thinner and used extreme weight control practices significantly more often than the other girls. However, of the girls who changed BMI from above the 75th percentile to under the 75th percentile, 34.1% reported that they had not used any weight control practices at all. Our results show that girls at a very early age are aware of the ‘thin’ ideal in our society, wish to be thinner, and try to lose weight. The results point to the importance of detecting girls who wish to be thinner as early as possible. If we can employ preventive action in time it is possible that dieting behavior will never develop. By considering the motives for wishing to be thinner, preventive efforts might be perceived as more meaningful and relevant to the girls at risk of developing eating disorders.

Keywords
wishing to be thinner; weight control practices; longitudinal design
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-122986 (URN)10.1002/erv.1145 (DOI)000305507100006 ()21800400 (PubMedID)
Projects
The IDA-Project
Available from: 2010-04-22 Created: 2010-04-22 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved
Welch, E., Lagerström, M. & Ghaderi, A. (2012). Body Shape Questionnaire: Psychometric properties of the short version (BSQ-8C) and norms from the general Swedish population.. Body image, 9(4), 547-50
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Body Shape Questionnaire: Psychometric properties of the short version (BSQ-8C) and norms from the general Swedish population.
2012 (English)In: Body image, ISSN 1740-1445, E-ISSN 1873-6807, Vol. 9, no 4, p. 547-50Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

There is a need for brief, sensitive, and reliable instruments for contextual assessment of body dissatisfaction. Suitable selection and optimal use of psychological assessment instruments requires appropriate psychometric as well as normative data. Two studies were conducted to investigate the psychometric properties and collect general population norms for a short, eight item version of the Body Shape Questionnaire (BSQ-8C). In the first study, a sample of undergraduate students (N=182) was recruited to investigate the psychometric properties of the BSQ-8C, while in the second study a sample from the general population of Swedish women aged 18-30 years (N=747) was used to collect norms. The test-retest reliability, internal consistency, and convergent validity for BSQ-8C were high. Given the questionnaire's briefness and good psychometric properties, particularly when used in conjunction with norms, the BSQ-8C is considered a valuable instrument for measuring body shape dissatisfaction among young adult women.

Keywords
Body dissatisfaction; Body Shape Questionnaire; BSQ-8C
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-183293 (URN)10.1016/j.bodyim.2012.04.009 (DOI)000310188200019 ()22721875 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2012-10-24 Created: 2012-10-24 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
Ramklint, M., Jeansson, M., Holmgren, S. & Ghaderi, A. (2012). Guided self-help as the first step for bulimic symptoms: Implementation of a stepped-care model within specialized psychiatry. International Journal of Eating Disorders, 45(1), 70-78
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Guided self-help as the first step for bulimic symptoms: Implementation of a stepped-care model within specialized psychiatry
2012 (English)In: International Journal of Eating Disorders, ISSN 0276-3478, E-ISSN 1098-108X, Vol. 45, no 1, p. 70-78Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: This study describes the implementation and effectiveness of the first step, guided self-help (GSH), in a clinical setting, of a stepped-care model of cognitive behavior therapy for patients with bulimic symptoms.

Method: Eighty-nine patients participated.

Results: In the intent to-treat analyses, the effect sizes were small to moderate (0.25-0.66). However, the effect sizes were substantially larger (0.44-1.66) for the patients who completed all the GSH sessions (45%). The majority of non-completers stayed within psychiatric services. Supplementary treatments were mostly directed towards comorbid conditions, especially depression. Those discontinuing treatment in advance where characterized by more lifetime diagnoses and higher ratings on the restraint subscale of the EDE-Q.

Discussion: GSH within specialized psychiatry might be effective for about 30% of the patients. There is no indication of patients losing their confidence in psychiatric services by being offered GSH as the first treatment.

Keywords
CBT, guided self-help, bulimia nervosa, effectiveness, implementation, stepped-care
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-167911 (URN)10.1002/eat.20921 (DOI)000298063600009 ()
Available from: 2012-02-03 Created: 2012-02-02 Last updated: 2017-12-08Bibliographically approved
Enebrink, P., Hogstrom, J., Forster, M. & Ghaderi, A. (2012). Internet-based parent management training: A randomized controlled study. Behaviour Research and Therapy, 50(4), 240-249
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Internet-based parent management training: A randomized controlled study
2012 (English)In: Behaviour Research and Therapy, ISSN 0005-7967, E-ISSN 1873-622X, Vol. 50, no 4, p. 240-249Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: The current study evaluated the efficacy of an Internet-based parent-training program for children with conduct problems. Dose-response ratio and costs for the program were also considered.

Method: Parents of 104 children (aged 3-12 years) were randomly allocated to either parent training or a waitlist control condition. Diagnostic assessment was conducted at baseline and parent ratings of child externalizing behaviors and parent strategies were completed before and after treatment and at 6-month follow-up.

Results: At post-treatment assessment, children whose parent(s) had received the intervention showed a greater reduction in conduct problems compared to the waitlist children. Between group intent-to-treat effect sizes (Cohen's d) on the Eyberg Intensity and Problem scales were .42 and .72, respectively (study completers .66 and 1.08). In addition, parents in the intervention group reported less use of harsh and inconsistent discipline after the treatment, as well as more positive praise. Effects on behavior problems were maintained at 6-month follow-up.

Conclusions: The results support the efficacy of parent training, administered through Internet, with outcomes comparable to many of the group-based parent training programs. The efficacy, low cost, and higher accessibility make this intervention a fitting part in a stepped-care model.

Keywords
Conduct problems, Aggressive behavior, Children, Parent management training, Internet-based treatment
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-174382 (URN)10.1016/j.brat.2012.01.006 (DOI)000302820600002 ()
Available from: 2012-05-22 Created: 2012-05-15 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
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