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Publications (10 of 67) Show all publications
Mörk, E., Sjögren, A. & Svaleryd, H. (2019). Consequences of parental job loss on the familyenvironment and on human capital formation: Evidence from plant closures. Uppsala: Uppsala University
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Consequences of parental job loss on the familyenvironment and on human capital formation: Evidence from plant closures
2019 (English)Report (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

We study the consequences of mothers’ and fathers’ job loss for parents, families, and children. Rich Swedish register data allow us to identify plant closures and account for non-random selection of workers to closing plants by using propensity score matching and controlling for pre-displacement outcomes. Our overall conclusion is positive: childhood health, educational and early adult outcomes are not adversely affected by parental job loss. Parents and families are however negatively affected in terms of parental health, labor market outcomes and separations. Limited effects on family disposable income suggest that generous unemployment insurance and a dual-earner norm shield families from financial distress, which together with universal health care and free education is likely to be protective for children.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Uppsala: Uppsala University, 2019. p. 48
Series
Working paper / Department of Economics, Uppsala University (Online), ISSN 1653-6975 ; 2019:7
Keywords
Parental unemployment, workplace closure, family environment, child health, human capital formation
National Category
Economics
Research subject
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-391963 (URN)
Available from: 2019-08-27 Created: 2019-08-27 Last updated: 2019-08-28Bibliographically approved
Kreiner, C. T. & Mörk, E. (2019). Introduction to the special issue. International Tax and Public Finance, 26(6), 1231-1233
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Introduction to the special issue
2019 (English)In: International Tax and Public Finance, ISSN 0927-5940, E-ISSN 1573-6970, Vol. 26, no 6, p. 1231-1233Article in journal, Editorial material (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2019
National Category
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-397930 (URN)10.1007/s10797-019-09582-5 (DOI)000494362900001 ()
Available from: 2019-12-06 Created: 2019-12-06 Last updated: 2019-12-06Bibliographically approved
Aalto, A.-M., Mörk, E., Sjögren, A. & Svaleryd, H. (2018). Childcare - A safety net for children? . Uppsala: Nationalekonomiska institutionen, Uppsala universitet
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Childcare - A safety net for children?
2018 (English)Report (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

We analyze how access to childcare affects health outcomes of children with unemployed parents using a reform that increased childcare access in some Swedish municipalities. For 4–5 year olds, we find an immediate increase in infection-related hospitalization, when these children first get access to childcare. We find no effect on younger children. When children are 10–11 years of age, children who did not have access to childcare when parents were unemployed are more likely to take medication for respiratory conditions. Taken together, our results thus suggest that access to childcare exposes children to risks for infections, but that need for medication in school age is lower for children who had access.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Uppsala: Nationalekonomiska institutionen, Uppsala universitet, 2018. p. 45
Series
Working paper / Department of Economics, Uppsala University (Online), ISSN 1653-6975 ; 2018:11
Keywords
Childcare; Child health; Unemployment; Quasi-experiment
National Category
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-359832 (URN)
Available from: 2018-09-06 Created: 2018-09-06 Last updated: 2018-09-06Bibliographically approved
Edmark, K., Liang, C.-Y., Mörk, E. & Selin, H. (2016). The Swedish Earned Income Tax Credit: Did It Increase Employment?. Finanzarchiv, 72(4), 475-503
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Swedish Earned Income Tax Credit: Did It Increase Employment?
2016 (English)In: Finanzarchiv, ISSN 0015-2218, E-ISSN 1614-0974, Vol. 72, no 4, p. 475-503Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper analyzes the extensive-margin labor-supply effects of a Swedish earned income tax credit introduced in 2007. The reform was one of the government's flagship reforms to boost employment, but its actual effects have been widely debated. We exploit the fact that the size of the tax credit is a function of the municipality of residence and income if working, which yields two sources of quasi-experimental variation. The identifying variation, however, turns out to be small and potentially endogenous, which means that the question of whether the reform has delivered the hoped-for effects cannot be credibly answered.

Keywords
labor supply, labor-force participation, tax incentives
National Category
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-315084 (URN)10.1628/001522116X14764450192108 (DOI)000391650300006 ()
Available from: 2017-02-09 Created: 2017-02-09 Last updated: 2017-11-21Bibliographically approved
Mörk, E. & Nordin, M. (2016). Voting, Taxes and Heterogeneous Preferences: Evidence from Swedish Local Elections.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Voting, Taxes and Heterogeneous Preferences: Evidence from Swedish Local Elections
2016 (English)Report (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

A standard finding in the literature on political agency is that voters punish incumbents who raise taxes. Typically, only the reaction of a representative voter is considered, with the notion that all voters dislike high taxes because the revenue is, at least on the margin, spent on rent-seeking activities. In this paper we question this interpretation by considering the heterogeneous responses to tax changes in the electorate. Using high-quality panel survey data from Swedish local politics we find that voters who, ex ante, prefer a small public sector punish incumbents who raise taxes, while voters who prefer a large public sector actually reward tax hikes. This result holds also conditional on individuals’ past voting behavior and for voters who have low condence in politicians, indicating that Swedish voters interpret tax changes based on their own policy preferences, rather than as going to wasteful activities.

Publisher
p. 30
Series
Working paper / Department of Economics, Uppsala University (Online), ISSN 1653-6975 ; 2016:5
Keywords
Electoral accountability; local taxation; voter preferences; political agency
National Category
Economics
Research subject
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-281791 (URN)
Available from: 2016-03-30 Created: 2016-03-30 Last updated: 2016-11-18Bibliographically approved
Mörk, E., Sjögren, A. & Svaleryd, H. (2014). Parental unemployment and child health. , 60(2)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Parental unemployment and child health
2014 (English)Report (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

We analyze to what extent health outcomes of Swedish children are worse among children whose parents become unemployed. To this end we combine Swedish hospitalization data for 1992-2007 for children 3-18 years of age with register data on parental unemployment. We find that children with unemployed parents are 17 percent more likely to be hospitalized than other children, but that most of the difference is driven by selection. A child fixed-effects approach suggests a small effect of parental unemployment on child health.

Publisher
p. 37
Series
Working paper / Department of Economics, Uppsala University (Online), ISSN 1653-6975 ; 2014:2
Keywords
Parental unemployment, child health, human capital
National Category
Economics
Research subject
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-224253 (URN)
Available from: 2014-05-07 Created: 2014-05-07 Last updated: 2014-09-08Bibliographically approved
Mörk, E., Sjögren, A. & Svaleryd, H. (2014). Parental Unemployment and Child Health. CESifo Economic Studies, 60(2), 366-401
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Parental Unemployment and Child Health
2014 (English)In: CESifo Economic Studies, ISSN 1610-241X, E-ISSN 1612-7501, Vol. 60, no 2, p. 366-401Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We analyze to what extent health outcomes of Swedish children are worse among children whose parents become unemployed. To this end we combine Swedish hospitalization data for 1992-2007 for children 3-18 years of age with register data on parental unemployment. We find that children with unemployed parents are 17% more likely to be hospitalized than other children, but that most of the difference is driven by selection. A child fixed-effects approach suggests a small effect of parental unemployment on child health. (JEL-codes: I12, J13).

Keywords
parental unemployment, child health, human capital
National Category
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-231507 (URN)10.1093/cesifo/ifu016 (DOI)000339901600005 ()
Available from: 2014-09-08 Created: 2014-09-08 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Lundqvist, H., Dahlberg, M. & Mörk, E. (2014). Stimulating Local Public Employment: Do General Grants Work?. American Economic Journal: Economic Policy, 6(1), 167-192
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Stimulating Local Public Employment: Do General Grants Work?
2014 (English)In: American Economic Journal: Economic Policy, ISSN 1945-7731, E-ISSN 1945-774X, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 167-192Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We apply the regression kink design to the Swedish grant system and estimate causal effects of intergovernmental grants on local public employment. Our robust conclusion is that grants do not stimulate local public employment. We find no statistically significant effects on total local public employment, and we can exclude even moderate effects. When disaggregating the total effect by sector, we find that personnel in the traditional welfare sectors are unaffected, a conclusion which applies to both publicly and privately employed in these sectors. The only positive and statistically significant effect of grants is that on administrative personnel.

National Category
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-247820 (URN)10.1257/pol.6.1.167 (DOI)000331195800007 ()
Available from: 2015-03-24 Created: 2015-03-24 Last updated: 2018-02-15Bibliographically approved
Mörk, E., Sjögren, A. & Svaleryd, H. (2013). Childcare costs and the demand for children-evidence from a nationwide reform. Journal of Population Economics, 26(1), 33-65
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Childcare costs and the demand for children-evidence from a nationwide reform
2013 (English)In: Journal of Population Economics, ISSN 0933-1433, E-ISSN 1432-1475, Vol. 26, no 1, p. 33-65Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Exploiting the exogenous variation in user fees caused by a Swedish childcare reform, we are able to identify the causal effect of childcare costs on fertility in a context in which childcare enrollment is almost universal, user fees are low, and labor force participation of mothers is very high. Anticipation of a reduction in childcare costs increased the number of first and higher-order births, but only seemed to affect the timing of second births. For families with many children we also find a marginally significant negative income effect on fertility.

Keywords
Childcare cost, Fertility, Quasi-experiment
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-184871 (URN)10.1007/s00148-011-0399-z (DOI)000310323600003 ()
Available from: 2012-11-21 Created: 2012-11-15 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
Edmark, K., Liang, C.-Y., Mörk, E. & Selin, H. (2012). Därför går det inte att utvärdera jobbskatteavdraget. Ekonomisk Debatt (5), 6-16
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Därför går det inte att utvärdera jobbskatteavdraget
2012 (Swedish)In: Ekonomisk Debatt, ISSN 0345-2646, no 5, p. 6-16Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.)) Published
National Category
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-186933 (URN)
Available from: 2012-11-30 Created: 2012-11-30 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-3944-603x

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