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Rydell, A.-M. & Brocki, K. C. (2019). Cognitive and Emotional Profiles of CU Traits and Disruptive Behavior in Adolescence: a Prospective Study. Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, 47(6), 1039-1051
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cognitive and Emotional Profiles of CU Traits and Disruptive Behavior in Adolescence: a Prospective Study
2019 (English)In: Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, ISSN 0091-0627, E-ISSN 1573-2835, Vol. 47, no 6, p. 1039-1051Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this study we followed 82–90 adolescents, 50% boys, from 15 to 16 years, investigating CU traits and disruptive behaviors as predictors of cognitive skills and arousal to emotional pictures. At age 15, CU traits were rated by adolescents and disruptive (aggregated ADHD-ODD-delinquent) behaviors were rated by parents and adolescents. At age 16, executive function, reaction time variability (RTV), IQ and arousal to negative pictures were assessed. The results showed that, with control for disruptive behaviors, CU traits predicted lower RTV, higher IQ and lower arousal to negative pictures. With control for CU traits, disruptive behaviors predicted lower spatial working memory, lower interference control and higher RTV. Our findings are of theoretical and clinical relevance as they point to highly diverging cognitive and emotional profiles of CU traits and disruptive behaviors.

Keywords
CU traits, Disruptive behavior, Adolescence, Executive functioning, IQ, Arousal to emotional pictures
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-368885 (URN)10.1007/s10802-018-0496-5 (DOI)000467490300010 ()30523475 (PubMedID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2009/2015-0167
Available from: 2018-12-10 Created: 2018-12-10 Last updated: 2019-06-19Bibliographically approved
Ehrstedt, C., Rydell, A.-M., Hallsten, M. G., Strömberg, B. & Ahlsten, G. (2018). Cognition, Health-Related Quality Of Life and Mood in Children and Young Adults Diagnosed with a Glioneuronal Tumor in Childhood. Paper presented at 18th International Symposium on Pediatric Neuro-Oncology (ISPNO), JUN 30-JUL 03, 2018, Denver, CO. Neuro-Oncology, 20, 161-161
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cognition, Health-Related Quality Of Life and Mood in Children and Young Adults Diagnosed with a Glioneuronal Tumor in Childhood
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2018 (English)In: Neuro-Oncology, ISSN 1522-8517, E-ISSN 1523-5866, Vol. 20, p. 161-161Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2018
National Category
Cancer and Oncology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-366681 (URN)10.1093/neuonc/noy059.600 (DOI)000438339000602 ()
Conference
18th International Symposium on Pediatric Neuro-Oncology (ISPNO), JUN 30-JUL 03, 2018, Denver, CO
Available from: 2018-11-23 Created: 2018-11-23 Last updated: 2018-11-23Bibliographically approved
Ehrstedt, C., Rydell, A.-M., Hallsten, M. G., Strömberg, B. & Ahlsten, G. (2018). Cognition, health-related quality of life, and mood in children and young adults diagnosed with a glioneuronal tumor in childhood. Epilepsy & Behavior, 83, 59-66
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cognition, health-related quality of life, and mood in children and young adults diagnosed with a glioneuronal tumor in childhood
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2018 (English)In: Epilepsy & Behavior, ISSN 1525-5050, E-ISSN 1525-5069, Vol. 83, p. 59-66Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aims: The aim of this study was to investigate long-term cognitive outcome, health-related quality of life (HRQoL), and psychiatric symptoms in children and young adults diagnosed with a glioneuronal tumor in childhood.

Methods: Twenty-eight children and adolescents (0-17.99 years) with a minimum postoperative follow-up time of five years were eligible for the study; four persons declined participation. A cross-sectional long-term follow-up evaluation was performed using the following study measures: Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children (WISC-IV) or Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS-IV), Reys Complex Figure Test (RCFT), Short Form 36 version 2 (SF-36v2), Short Form 10 (SF-10), Quality of Life in Epilepsy 31 (QOLIE-31), Hospital Anxiety Depression Scale (HADS) or Beck Youth Inventory Scales (BYI), and Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale. Historical WISC-III and RCFT data were used to compare cognitive longitudinal data.

Results: Mean follow-up time after surgery was 12.1 years. Sixty-three percent (15/24) were seizure-free. Despite a successive postoperative gain in cognitive function, a significant reduction relative to norms was seen in the seizure-free group with respect to perceptual reasoning index (PRI), working memory index (WMI), and full-scale intelligence quotient (FSIQ). Seizure freedom resulted in acceptable HRQoL. Thirty-two percent and 16% exceeded the threshold level of possible anxiety and depression, respectively, despite seizure freedom.

Conclusion: Although lower than in corresponding reference groups, cognitive outcome and HRQoL are good provided that seizure freedom or at least a low seizure severity can be achieved. There is a risk of elevated levels of psychiatric symptoms. Long-term clinical follow-up is advisable.

Keywords
Glioneuronal brain tumors, Cognition, Quality of life, Mood, Long-term outcome
National Category
Pediatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-357694 (URN)10.1016/j.yebeh.2018.03.026 (DOI)000434400600009 ()29654937 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-08-22 Created: 2018-08-22 Last updated: 2019-01-07Bibliographically approved
Helgesson, G., Bertilsson, G., Domeij, H., Fahlström, G., Heintz, E., Hjern, A., . . . Hultcrantz, M. (2018). Ethical aspects of diagnosis and interventions for children with fetal alcohol Spectrum disorder (FASD) and their families. BMC Medical Ethics, 19, Article ID 1.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Ethical aspects of diagnosis and interventions for children with fetal alcohol Spectrum disorder (FASD) and their families
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2018 (English)In: BMC Medical Ethics, ISSN 1472-6939, E-ISSN 1472-6939, Vol. 19, article id 1Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD) is an umbrella term covering several conditions for which alcohol consumption during pregnancy is taken to play a causal role. The benefit of individuals being identified with a condition within FASD remains controversial. The objective of the present study was to identify ethical aspects and consequences of diagnostics, interventions, and family support in relation to FASD.

Methods: Ethical aspects relating to diagnostics, interventions, and family support regarding FASD were compiled and discussed, drawing on a series of discussions with experts in the field, published literature, and medical ethicists.

Results: Several advantages and disadvantages in regards of obtaining a diagnosis or description of the condition were identified. For instance, it provides an explanation and potential preparedness for not yet encountered difficulties, which may play an essential role in acquiring much needed help and support from health care, school, and the socia ! services. There are no interventions specifically evaluated for FASD conditions, but training programs and family support for conditions with symptoms overlapping with FASD, e.g. ADHD, autism, and intellectual disability, are likely to be relevant. Stigmatization, blame, and guilt are potential downsides. There might also be unfortunate prioritization if individuals with equal needs are treated differently depending on whether or not they meet the criteria for a specific condition. Conclusions: The value for the concerned individuals of obtaining a FASD-related description of their condition - for instance, in terms of wellbeing - is not established. Nor is it established that allocating resources based, on whether individuals fulfil FASD-related criteria is justified, compared to allocations directed to the most prominent specific needs.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BIOMED CENTRAL LTD, 2018
Keywords
Alcohol consumption, Alcohol exposition, ARBD, ARND, Diagnostics, Ethics, Family support, Fas, FASD, pFAS
National Category
Medical Ethics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-341581 (URN)10.1186/S12910-017-0242-5 (DOI)000419520800001 ()29304784 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research CouncilForte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2014-4024
Available from: 2018-02-14 Created: 2018-02-14 Last updated: 2018-02-14Bibliographically approved
Thorell, L. B., Sjowall, D., Diamatopoulou, S., Rydell, A.-M. & Bohlin, G. (2017). Emotional functioning, ADHD symptoms, and peer problems: A longitudinal investigation of children age 6-9.5years. Infant and Child Development, 26(4), Article ID e2008.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Emotional functioning, ADHD symptoms, and peer problems: A longitudinal investigation of children age 6-9.5years
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2017 (English)In: Infant and Child Development, ISSN 1522-7227, E-ISSN 1522-7219, Vol. 26, no 4, article id e2008Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of the present study was to investigate the interplay between attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptoms and emotional functioning in relation to peer problems. Parent ratings of ADHD symptoms and regulation/reactivity with regard to four emotions (anger, sadness, fear, and happiness/exuberance) at age six were investigated in relation to sociometric peer nominations 3years later in a non-clinical sample (n=91). Reactivity and regulation were only modestly correlated, and these two aspects of emotional functioning did not show the same relation to peer problems. The main finding was that, it was primarily children with high levels of ADHD symptoms in combination with either high dysregulation or low reactivity with regard to happiness/exuberance who received many negative peer nominations. In addition, high levels of ADHD symptoms in combination with high reactivity with regard to anger were associated with nominations of physical aggression. The modest relation between reactivity and regulation emphasizes the importance of separating these two constructs. The fact that it was primarily happiness/exuberance, as opposed to negative emotions, that was associated with negative peer nominations suggests that future studies are needed to clarify the role of specific emotions in relation to the functional impairments associated with ADHD symptoms. Highlights The present study aimed to investigate the interplay between ADHD symptoms and emotional functioning in relation to peer problems using a longitudinal design (age 6-9 years). Ratings of ADHD symptoms and emotional functioning were investigated in relation to sociometric peer nominations and results showed that it was primarily children with high levels of ADHD symptoms in combination with either high dysregulation or low reactivity with regard to happiness/exuberance who received many negative peer nominations. The fact that it was primarily happiness/exuberance, as opposed to negative emotions, that was associated with negative peer nominations suggests that future studies are needed to clarify the role of specific emotions in relation to the functional impairments associated with ADHD symptoms.

Keywords
ADHD symptoms, emotion regulation, emotional reactivity, peer problems, sociometry
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-333531 (URN)10.1002/icd.2008 (DOI)000407253000007 ()
Available from: 2017-11-15 Created: 2017-11-15 Last updated: 2017-11-15Bibliographically approved
Sjöwall, D., Bohlin, G., Rydell, A.-M. & Thorell, L. B. (2017). Neuropsychological deficits in preschool as predictors of ADHD symptoms and academic achievement in late adolescence. Child Neuropsychology, 23(1), 111-128
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Neuropsychological deficits in preschool as predictors of ADHD symptoms and academic achievement in late adolescence
2017 (English)In: Child Neuropsychology, ISSN 0929-7049, E-ISSN 1744-4136, Vol. 23, no 1, p. 111-128Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

High levels of ADHD symptoms are related to severe negative outcomes, which underscore the importance of identifying early markers of these behavior problems. The main aim of the present study was therefore to investigate whether neuropsychological deficits in preschool are related to later ADHD symptoms and academic achievement, over and above the influence of early ADHD symptom levels. The present study is unique because it includes a broader range of predictors compared to previous studies and the participants are followed over time for as long as 13 years (i.e., ages 5 – 18 years). Preschool data included measures of executive functioning and reaction time variability as well as emotional reactivity and emotion regulation of both positive and negative emotions. When controlling for early ADHD symptom levels, working memory, reaction time variability, and regula- tion of happiness/exuberance were significantly related to inattention whereas regulation of happiness/ exuberance and anger reactivity were significantly related to hyperactivity/impulsivity. Furthermore, working memory and reaction time variability in preschool were significantly related to academic achievement in late adolescence beyond the influence of early ADHD symptoms. These findings could suggest that it is possible to screen for early neuropsychological deficits and thereby identify children who are at risk of negative outcomes. Furthermore, our results suggest that interventions need to look beyond executive functioning deficits in ADHD and also target the role of emotional functioning and reaction time variability. The importance of including both the positive and negative aspects of emotional functioning and distinguishing between emotion regulation and emotional reactivity was also demonstrated.

Keywords
ADHD, Executive function, Emotion regulation, Academic achievement, Longitudinal
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-293545 (URN)10.1080/09297049.2015.1063595 (DOI)000394360700006 ()26212755 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-05-13 Created: 2016-05-13 Last updated: 2017-04-18Bibliographically approved
Salari, R., Bohlin, G., Rydell, A.-M. & Thorell, L. (2017). Neuropsychological functioning and attachment representations in early school age as predictors of ADHD symptoms in late adolescence. Child Psychiatry and Human Development, 48(3), 370-384
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Neuropsychological functioning and attachment representations in early school age as predictors of ADHD symptoms in late adolescence
2017 (English)In: Child Psychiatry and Human Development, ISSN 0009-398X, E-ISSN 1573-3327, Vol. 48, no 3, p. 370-384Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study aimed to examine relations between parent and child attachment representations and neuropsychological functions at age 8, as well as relations between these constructs and ADHD symptoms over a 10-year period. A community-based sample of 105 children (52 boys) participated. Measures of attachment representations and a range of neuropsychological functions were collected at age 8. Parents rated emotion dysregulation and ADHD symptoms at age 8 and ADHD symptoms again at age 18. Significant, although modest, relations were found between disorganized attachment and some aspects of neuropsychological functioning in childhood. When studying outcomes in late adolescence and controlling for early ADHD symptom levels, spatial working memory and disorganized attachment remained significant in relation to both ADHD symptom domains, and one measure of inhibition remained significant for hyperactivity/impulsivity. When examining independent effects, spatial working memory and disorganized attachment were related to inattention, whereas spatial working memory and dysregulation of happiness/exuberance were related to hyperactivity/impulsivity. Our findings showing that disorganized attachment is longitudinally related to ADHD symptoms over and above the influence of both neuropsychological functioning and early ADHD symptom levels highlights the importance of including measures of attachment representations when trying to understand the development of ADHD symptoms. If replicated in more “at-risk” samples, these findings could also suggest that parent–child attachment should be taken into consideration when children are referred for assessment and treatment of ADHD.

National Category
Applied Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-303710 (URN)10.1007/s10578-016-0664-1 (DOI)000400070900002 ()27349655 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council
Available from: 2016-09-22 Created: 2016-09-22 Last updated: 2017-06-09Bibliographically approved
Giannotta, F. & Rydell, A.-M. (2017). The role of the mother-child relationship in the route from child ADHD to adolescent symptoms of depressed mood. Journal of Adolescence, 61, 40-49
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The role of the mother-child relationship in the route from child ADHD to adolescent symptoms of depressed mood
2017 (English)In: Journal of Adolescence, ISSN 0140-1971, E-ISSN 1095-9254, Vol. 61, p. 40-49Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We attempt to explain the co-variation between ADHD and symptoms of depressed mood, focusing on the family context and testing whether the mother-child relationship mediates or moderates the link between child ADHD and youth depressed mood symptoms. In a longitudinal study, we used mother and youth reports for 596 Swedish youth, 50% boys, from a community sample at 10, 15, and 18 years of age. The results did not support the mediation hypothesis. Only one moderation effect was found. Mother-child conflicts in mid-adolescence, as rated by mothers, increased symptoms of depressed mood symptoms in late adolescent only for youth with high levels of hyperactivity symptoms. However, depressed mood symptoms at age 18 were predicted by low mother-child involvement in mid-adolescence, over and above the effects of inattention symptoms. This latter finding was consistent across mother and youth ratings of the relationship. Implications of these results are discussed. (C) 2017 The Foundation for Professionals in Services for Adolescents. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2017
Keywords
Inattention and hyperactivity, Symptoms of depressed mood, Youth, Mother-child relationship
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-339691 (URN)10.1016/j.adolescence.2017.09.005 (DOI)000417771300006 ()28957711 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-01-29 Created: 2018-01-29 Last updated: 2018-01-29Bibliographically approved
Giannotta, F. & Rydell, A.-M. (2016). The Prospective Links Between Hyperactive/Impulsive, Inattentive, and Oppositional-Defiant Behaviors in Childhood and Antisocial Behavior in Adolescence: The Moderating Influence of Gender and the Parent–Child Relationship Quality. Child Psychiatry and Human Development, 47(6), 857-870
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Prospective Links Between Hyperactive/Impulsive, Inattentive, and Oppositional-Defiant Behaviors in Childhood and Antisocial Behavior in Adolescence: The Moderating Influence of Gender and the Parent–Child Relationship Quality
2016 (English)In: Child Psychiatry and Human Development, ISSN 0009-398X, E-ISSN 1573-3327, Vol. 47, no 6, p. 857-870Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We prospectively investigated the effect of child hyperactive/impulsive, inattentive, and oppositional/defiant behaviors on the development of youth antisocial behaviors, and the moderating influence of gender and the parent-child relationship quality in a normative sample. Participants (N = 673, 50 % girls) were assessed at 10 years of age (parent reports) and at age 15 (parent and adolescent reports). Using latent change models, we found that initial levels of, as well as increases in, hyperactivity/impulsivity and oppositional behaviors and initial levels of inattention behaviors predicted youth antisocial behaviors. The increase in oppositional behaviors was predictive of youth antisocial behaviors in girls only. Child hyperactive/impulsive behaviors predicted youth antisocial behaviors only in children for whom the quality of the parent-child relationship deteriorated from childhood to adolescence. Thus, both initial levels of and increases in disruptive behaviors as well as gender are important for understanding the development of antisocial behaviors in adolescence. We received partial support for the hypothesized, moderating role of a high-quality parent-child relationship.

Keywords
Hyperactivity/impulsivity; Inattention; Oppositional-defiant; Antisocial behaviors; Child-parent relationship; Gender
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-293546 (URN)10.1007/s10578-015-0617-0 (DOI)000386558500002 ()26680210 (PubMedID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2009-0167
Available from: 2016-05-13 Created: 2016-05-13 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
Scholtens, S., Rydell, A.-M., Bohlin, G. & Thorell, L. B. (2014). ADHD Symptoms and Attachment Representations: Considering the Role of Conduct Problems, Cognitive Deficits and Narrative Responses in Non-Attachment-Related Story Stems. Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, 42(6), 1033-1042
Open this publication in new window or tab >>ADHD Symptoms and Attachment Representations: Considering the Role of Conduct Problems, Cognitive Deficits and Narrative Responses in Non-Attachment-Related Story Stems
2014 (English)In: Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, ISSN 0091-0627, E-ISSN 1573-2835, Vol. 42, no 6, p. 1033-1042Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The overall aim of the present study was to investigate ADHD symptoms in relation to attachment representations. We used both attachment- and non-attachment-related story stems, which allowed us to investigate whether problems with narrative production can explain the relation between ADHD symptoms and attachment representations. We also investigated the role of cognitive deficits and conduct problems in these relations. The sample consisted of 89 children (27 % girls) between 6 and 10 years old, with an oversampling of children with high levels of ADHD symptoms. ADHD symptoms and conduct problems were rated by parents and teachers. Cognitive functioning was investigated using laboratory tests of inhibition, working memory and sustained attention. Attachment representations were coded as secure, organized insecure and disorganized categories. Narrative responses to non-attachment-related story stems were coded for incoherence and negative content. Results showed that children in the disorganized attachment category had significantly higher levels of ADHD symptoms compared to those in the secure category. Both ADHD symptoms and disorganized attachment were related to incoherence and negative content. Attachment representations were not associated with ADHD symptoms when controlling for negative content in response to non-attachment-related story stems. These results suggest that the associations between attachment security and ADHD are yet to be fully understood. Importantly, a propensity to envisage negative events seems to characterize children with high levels of ADHD symptoms.

Keywords
ADHD symptoms, Attachment representations, Cognitive deficits, Narrative, Incoherence, Negative content
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-230072 (URN)10.1007/s10802-014-9854-0 (DOI)000339331100013 ()24562639 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2014-09-03 Created: 2014-08-19 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-4352-9647

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