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Publications (10 of 88) Show all publications
Evans, C. & Rydén, G. (2018). ‘Voyage iron’: an Atlantic slave trade currency, its European origins, and West African impact. Past & Present
Open this publication in new window or tab >>‘Voyage iron’: an Atlantic slave trade currency, its European origins, and West African impact
2018 (English)In: Past & Present, ISSN 0031-2746, E-ISSN 1477-464XArticle in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

An array of goods was traded to Africa in the era of the transatlantic slave trade. Many were eye-catching consumer goods; others were far more mundane, including ‘voyage iron’, a metal forged in northern Europe, bars of which acted as a currency along the West African coast. This article examines the geography of voyage iron production, showing that it originated in places – primarily Sweden – that are not often thought of as being connected to Atlantic commerce. It then considers the impact that European iron had on West Africa, where iron smelting was very well-established locally. The vibrancy of African metallurgy has led some distinguished Africanists to dismiss voyage iron as marginal to African needs. By contrast, it is contended here that European iron underpinned an agro-environmental transformation of the coastal forests in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries and played a major role in the spread of New World crops in West Africa. Voyage iron was a superficially unremarkable producer good but it contributed to a profound reshaping of the economic geography of West Africa.

National Category
Economic History
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-339024 (URN)10.1093/pastj/gtx055 (DOI)
Available from: 2018-01-15 Created: 2018-01-15 Last updated: 2018-01-26Bibliographically approved
Rydén, G. & Evans, C. (2017). Connecting Labour: Organizing Swedish Ironmaking in an Atlantic Context (1ed.). In: Mary Hilson, Silke Neunsinger & Iben Vyff (Ed.), Labour, Unions and Politics under the North Star: The Nordic Countries, 1700-2000 (pp. 71-87). Berghahn Books
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Connecting Labour: Organizing Swedish Ironmaking in an Atlantic Context
2017 (English)In: Labour, Unions and Politics under the North Star: The Nordic Countries, 1700-2000 / [ed] Mary Hilson, Silke Neunsinger & Iben Vyff, Berghahn Books, 2017, 1, p. 71-87Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Berghahn Books, 2017 Edition: 1
Series
International Studies in Social History ; 28
National Category
History and Archaeology Economic History
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-326833 (URN)978-1-78533-496-2 (ISBN)978-1-78533-497-9 (ISBN)
Available from: 2017-07-31 Created: 2017-07-31 Last updated: 2017-07-31
Fiebranz, R., Lindström, J. & Rydén, G. (2016). The Diversity of Work. In: Maria Ågren (Ed.), Making a Living, Making a Difference: Gender and Work in Early Modern Society. New York: Oxford University Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Diversity of Work
2016 (English)In: Making a Living, Making a Difference: Gender and Work in Early Modern Society / [ed] Maria Ågren, New York: Oxford University Press, 2016Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York: Oxford University Press, 2016
Keyword
gender, work, early modern period, Sweden, verb-oriented method, GaW database
National Category
History
Research subject
History
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-293405 (URN)9780190240615 (ISBN)
Projects
Gender and Work
Funder
Knut and Alice Wallenberg FoundationSwedish Research Council
Available from: 2016-05-15 Created: 2016-05-12 Last updated: 2017-03-17
Fiebranz, R., Lindström, D., Lindström, J., Mispelaere, J. & Rydén, G. (2016). Working Together. In: Maria Ågren (Ed.), Making a Living, Making a Difference: Gender and work in early modern European society. New York: Oxford University Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Working Together
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2016 (English)In: Making a Living, Making a Difference: Gender and work in early modern European society / [ed] Maria Ågren, New York: Oxford University Press, 2016Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York: Oxford University Press, 2016
Keyword
gender, work, early modern period, Sweden, verb-oriented method, GaW database
National Category
History
Research subject
History
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-293904 (URN)9780190240615 (ISBN)
Projects
Gender and Work
Funder
Knut and Alice Wallenberg FoundationSwedish Research Council
Available from: 2016-05-15 Created: 2016-05-15 Last updated: 2017-03-17
Rydén, G. (2015). From Razors to Rock Drills: Metals in the Early Modern World. Scandia, 81(2), 107-117
Open this publication in new window or tab >>From Razors to Rock Drills: Metals in the Early Modern World
2015 (English)In: Scandia, ISSN 0036-5483, Vol. 81, no 2, p. 107-117Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of this article is to highlight the importance of metals to the early modern world. It would not, to take one example, have been possible to shave, and thus to appear as the smooth-faced gentleman of the period, without the development in steel-making technologies, and the actual extraction of ore would also have been hampered without the very same development, as would cabinet-making. The importance of metals is also emphasized by the way in which they were entangled in many other developments. Metals were traded globally and circulated in similar flows to textiles, exotic woods and turtle shells. Exquisite steel wares were also sometimes combined with these other materials, as in a delicate mahogany etui, clad in green velvet and filled with assorted Sheffield wares, given to the Brukspatron Michaelson, at Skebo. This example is crucial in another way as well. The steel incorporated in these wares was made from iron produced in Michaelson's own forges, underlining the close affiliation of production and consumption, what we call Making and Taking, in the thinking of the early modern world. Such commercial and manufacturing loops, jumping as they do between production and consumption, create a starting-point for the analysis outlined here. Another aim is to re-instate metals in the ongoing discussions about the developments that replaced the early modern world with the present modern society we now inhabit. Metals, and in particular iron, figured prominently in the more heroic, or even revolutionary, explanations that dominated the first decades of the postwar period, but have waned ever since. From the 1970s the textile trades enjoyed a more central/significant place in explanations stressing the gradual aspect of development. It is time, we argue, to once again reinstate metals in the discussion about global development towards our present society. In conclusion we would like to say that our ambition is to establish a 'historiographical loop', in that we want to use the early modern way of analytically linking production to consumption, as a means to better understand and explain early modern society and its gradual development into our own time.

Keyword
Global history, iron and steel, production and consumption, historical change
National Category
History
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-283687 (URN)000371845600010 ()
Available from: 2016-04-14 Created: 2016-04-14 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
Rydén, G. (2014). Bebyggelsehistorisk Tidskrift.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Bebyggelsehistorisk Tidskrift
2014 (Swedish)Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
Series
Bebyggelsehistorisk Tidskrift, ISSN 0349-2834 ; 68
National Category
Other Social Sciences Humanities
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-241092 (URN)
Note

Redaktör.

Available from: 2015-01-08 Created: 2015-01-08 Last updated: 2017-01-17
Rydén, G. (2013). Eskilstuna Fristad: The beginnings of an urban experiment. In: Göran Rydén (Ed.), Sweden in the Eighteenth-Century World. : Provincial Cosmopolitans (pp. 123-146). Farnham: Ashgate
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Eskilstuna Fristad: The beginnings of an urban experiment
2013 (English)In: Sweden in the Eighteenth-Century World. : Provincial Cosmopolitans / [ed] Göran Rydén, Farnham: Ashgate, 2013, p. 123-146Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Eighteenth-century Sweden was deeply involved in the process of globalisation: ships leaving Sweden’s central ports exported bar iron that would drive the Industrial Revolution, whilst arriving ships would bring not only exotic goods and commodities to Swedish consumers, but also new ideas and cultural practices with them. At the same time, Sweden was an agricultural country to a large extent governed by self-subsistence, and - for most - wealth was created within this structure. This volume brings together a group of scholars from a range of disciplinary backgrounds who seek to present a more nuanced and elaborated picture of the Swedish cosmopolitan eighteenth century. Together they paint a picture of Sweden that is more like the one eighteenth-century intellectuals imagined, and help to situate Sweden in histories of cosmopolitanism of the wider world.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Farnham: Ashgate, 2013
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-211165 (URN)978-1-4094-6589-8 (ISBN)
Available from: 2013-11-20 Created: 2013-11-20 Last updated: 2017-01-17
Evans, C. & Rydén, G. (2013). From Gammelbo Bruk to Calabar: Swedish Iron in an Expanding Atlantic Economy. In: Magdalena Naum & Jonas M. Nordin (Ed.), Scandinavian Colonialism and the Rise of Modernity: Small Time Agents in a Global Arena. New York: Springer
Open this publication in new window or tab >>From Gammelbo Bruk to Calabar: Swedish Iron in an Expanding Atlantic Economy
2013 (English)In: Scandinavian Colonialism and the Rise of Modernity: Small Time Agents in a Global Arena / [ed] Magdalena Naum & Jonas M. Nordin, New York: Springer, 2013Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York: Springer, 2013
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-200412 (URN)9781461462019 (ISBN)
Available from: 2013-05-27 Created: 2013-05-27 Last updated: 2017-01-17
Berg, E. G., Du Pradel, C. D., Fiebranz, R., Jacobsson, B., Jansson, K. H., Lennersand, M., . . . Östman, A.-C. (2013). Praktiker som gör skillnad: Om den verb-inriktade metoden. Historisk Tidskrift (S), 133(3), 335-354
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Praktiker som gör skillnad: Om den verb-inriktade metoden
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2013 (Swedish)In: Historisk Tidskrift (S), ISSN 0345-469X, Vol. 133, no 3, p. 335-354Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article discusses the so-called verb-oriented method and its role in the research project Gender and Work in early modern Sweden (GaW), which is based at Uppsala University. It provides a presentation of the GaW-database, which has been designed to allow analysis according to the verb-method. Finally, the article points out that this method can be combined with a number of different theoretical approaches as long as the focus is on practices. It is therefore compatible with the approaches of e.g., Judith Butler, Michel de Certeau, and Amartya Sen. Work is defined as "time-use with the purpose of making a living" and the article discusses why data on time-use, or actual work activities, are better suited for research into early modern Swedish working life than other types of data. It shows that activities are usually described in the sources by verb-phrases, and explains how and from what sources verb-phrases are collected and analyzed within the project. In order to allow for generalizations the verb-method presupposes large amounts of data. This is the rationale for the GaW-database, which at present includes around 5000 verb-phrases and 75000 data posts.

Keyword
Sweden, early modern period, gender, history of work, historical method, quantitative analysis, verb-oriented method
National Category
History Work Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-227976 (URN)000336234800003 ()
Projects
Gender and work
Available from: 2014-07-02 Created: 2014-07-02 Last updated: 2017-12-05
Rydén, G. (2013). Provincial Cosmopolitanism: An Introduction. In: Ryden, Göran (Ed.), Sweden in the Eighteenth-Century World: Provincial Cosmopolitans (pp. 1-32). Farnham: Ashgate
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Provincial Cosmopolitanism: An Introduction
2013 (English)In: Sweden in the Eighteenth-Century World: Provincial Cosmopolitans / [ed] Ryden, Göran, Farnham: Ashgate, 2013, p. 1-32Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Eighteenth-century Sweden was deeply involved in the process of globalisation: ships leaving Sweden’s central ports exported bar iron that would drive the Industrial Revolution, whilst arriving ships would bring not only exotic goods and commodities to Swedish consumers, but also new ideas and cultural practices with them. At the same time, Sweden was an agricultural country to a large extent governed by self-subsistence, and - for most - wealth was created within this structure. This volume brings together a group of scholars from a range of disciplinary backgrounds who seek to present a more nuanced and elaborated picture of the Swedish cosmopolitan eighteenth century. Together they paint a picture of Sweden that is more like the one eighteenth-century intellectuals imagined, and help to situate Sweden in histories of cosmopolitanism of the wider world.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Farnham: Ashgate, 2013
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-207552 (URN)9781409465881 (ISBN)
Available from: 2013-09-16 Created: 2013-09-16 Last updated: 2017-01-17Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-7556-3391

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