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Evaldsson, Ann-Carita
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Publications (10 of 75) Show all publications
Cekaite, A. & Evaldsson, A.-C. (2019). Stance and footing in multilingual play: Rescaling practices and heritage language use in a Swedish preschool. Journal of Pragmatics, 144, 127-140
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Stance and footing in multilingual play: Rescaling practices and heritage language use in a Swedish preschool
2019 (English)In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387, Vol. 144, p. 127-140Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study examines how young immigrant children in multilingual playful activities with peers and adults engage with and explore heritage language forms (e.g., their features, social values and pragmatic uses), as well as transgress boundaries between different language varieties. It is argued that such ludic language practices located and enacted within micro-interactional processes in turn link to and contribute to macro-level socio-cultural values and tensions of languages. The selected data constitute a case study based on a video-ethnography of multilingual language practices in a preschool (for 3- to 6-year-olds) with a Swedish monolingual policy. It is found that the children's multilingual play involve the exploitation of heritage language and linguistic incongruities: it takes the shape of exaggerated repetitions, transformations of language forms (phonetic, morphological and syntactic features), various keying resources, i.e., affective (serious or ludic) and metalinguistic stances. The findings underscore the importance of taking into account young immigrant children's agency in creating new spaces (e.g., ludic or instructional activities) for heritage language forms and varieties as they are used for entertaining, rather than educational purposes. (C) 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Stance, Footing, Scale, Children's peer interactions, Language play, Heritage language
National Category
General Language Studies and Linguistics Specific Languages
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-387563 (URN)10.1016/j.pragma.2017.11.011 (DOI)000469161300010 ()
Available from: 2019-06-25 Created: 2019-06-25 Last updated: 2019-06-25Bibliographically approved
Evaldsson, A.-C. & Svahn, J. (2019). Tracing unique trajectores of participation for a 'girl with ADHD': From 'unwilling student' to 'agentive learning'. Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties, 24(3), 254-272
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Tracing unique trajectores of participation for a 'girl with ADHD': From 'unwilling student' to 'agentive learning'
2019 (English)In: Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties, ISSN 1363-2752, E-ISSN 1741-2692, Vol. 24, no 3, p. 254-272Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The overall aim of this study is to explore how individual children with long-term school difficulties follow unique ‘trajectories of participation’ in special educational needs settings, sometimes in unexpected ways, and how this contributes to alternative forms of identification and processes of learning. The data draws on long-term video-ethnographic work, tracing trajectories of participation during the course of a school year for an individual girl with an ADHD diagnosis who is a newcomer to a special support school in Sweden. We use a multi-layered theoretical and methodological framework to learning, identities and participation as situated practices to explore how the focal girl, through her everyday participation in classroom contexts structured to amplify the student’s capabilities, gradually moves from an ‘unwilling student’ to an ‘agentive learner’. Through a multimodal interactional analysis, we demonstrate how the focal girl’s actions and the teacher’s scaffolding responses are interactionally organised, and the emotional and relational dimensions in the creation of participation frameworks for learning. It is argued that the student’s agency and emerging emotional engagement in school-based learning are intimately linked to the pursuit of building long-term learning relationships based on mutual trust.

Keywords
ADHD, Identity formation, trajectories of participation, emotional scaffolding, multimodal interactional analysis
National Category
Educational Sciences
Research subject
Education
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-383524 (URN)10.1080/13632752.2019.1609270 (DOI)000478815800004 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2011-5746
Available from: 2019-05-16 Created: 2019-05-16 Last updated: 2019-09-26Bibliographically approved
Danby, S., Evaldsson, A.-C., Melander, H. & Aarsand, P. (2018). Situated collaboration and problem solving in young children's digital game play. British Journal of Educational Technology, 49(5), 959-972
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Situated collaboration and problem solving in young children's digital game play
2018 (English)In: British Journal of Educational Technology, ISSN 0007-1013, E-ISSN 1467-8535, Vol. 49, no 5, p. 959-972Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Collaboration is an important aspect of social activity associated with young children’s digital gameplay. Children organise their participation as they communicate with and support one another, through sharing knowledge and problem-solving strategies, displaying their expertise, encouraging others and creatively exploring possibilities for collaborative game moves. Drawing on a social interactional perspective, we explore the situated and embodied practices of the young players aged 3–8 years. We present three video ethnographic case studies of young children’s everyday peer interactions from three different settings and age groups: Australia (home), Norway (pre-school) and Sweden (afterschool). Across these settings, the findings identify how children collaborate with one another to progress the game by using multiple strategies, including instructing each other, monitoring each other’s actions and problem solving. In the process, collaborative peer culture was maintained and built as the players worked towards problem solutions that require taking each other’s perspectives, and sharing digital devices and skills. This focus on children’s situated language use and assemblage of multimodal resources shows their moment-by-moment collaborative action. These multimodal interactions create opportunities for peer and sibling learning without the presence of an adult. The collaborative activity was a strategic resource used by the children in their digital game playing. In capturing young children’s own strategies, we highlight their agency in learning occurring through social interaction and gameplay.

National Category
Pedagogy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-355672 (URN)10.1111/bjet.12636 (DOI)000444224900013 ()
Note

Marcus och Amalia Wallenbergs stiftelse (Projektnr. MAW 2014:0057)

Available from: 2018-07-03 Created: 2018-07-03 Last updated: 2018-11-20Bibliographically approved
Lundmark, S. & Evaldsson, A.-C. (2017). Click-guides and Panic buttons: Designed possibilities for youth agency and user empowerment in online youth counselling services. Childhood, 24(2), 260-278
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Click-guides and Panic buttons: Designed possibilities for youth agency and user empowerment in online youth counselling services
2017 (English)In: Childhood, ISSN 0907-5682, E-ISSN 1461-7013, Vol. 24, no 2, p. 260-278Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study examines how possibilities for agency are designed into online youth counselling services, as well as how such possibilities are addressed by young prospective users during the design of the services. The data are drawn both from the design of a national website for youth clinics in Sweden and from a design project developing e-services for local youth clinics in a Swedish municipality. The agency of young users is here treated as a key concern for understanding how user empowerment is accomplished through the design of websites and e-services. Using combined research materials (i.e. two websites and focus group meetings), this study demonstrates how design features may both facilitate and restrict young people’s involvement and control over sensitive and private issues. In addition, we demonstrate how the designed possibilities for empowerment may allow young users to critically approach and effectively use such services.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage publications: , 2017
Keywords
digital control, empowerment, focus group meetings, interaction design, online youth counselling services, privacy, website analysis, youth agency
National Category
Social Sciences Pedagogy Media and Communications
Research subject
Education; Human-Computer Interaction
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-293640 (URN)10.1177/0907568216656761 (DOI)000400911200009 ()
Available from: 2016-05-14 Created: 2016-05-14 Last updated: 2017-06-22Bibliographically approved
Cekaite, A. & Evaldsson, A.-C. (2017). Language policies in play: Learning ecologies in multilingual preschool interactions among peers and teachers. Multilingua - Journal of Cross-cultural and Interlanguage Communication, 36(4), 451-475
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Language policies in play: Learning ecologies in multilingual preschool interactions among peers and teachers
2017 (English)In: Multilingua - Journal of Cross-cultural and Interlanguage Communication, ISSN 0167-8507, E-ISSN 1613-3684, Vol. 36, no 4, p. 451-475Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this study we argue that a focus on language learning ecologies, i.e., situations for participation in various communicative practices can shed light on the intricate processes through which minority children develop or are constrained from acquiring cultural and linguistic competencies (here of a majority language). The analysis draws on a language socialization approach to examine the micro-level contexts of an immigrant child’s preschool interactions with peers and teachers and the interplay between these and macro-level language and educational policies. It was found that the focal girl mainly participated in unstructured peer play due to the preschool educational and language policy. The girl’s limited Swedish (simple nouns, verbs, formulaic expressions) served as a resource for collusive peer language play (negatively keyed recyclings, mimicking, nonsensical words) portraying her language as incomprehensible. In interaction with teachers the child’s nonverbal acts were interpreted into verbal forms (repeating and expanding conversational, lexical and grammatical contributions). The fact that the girl did not align with the teacher’s conversational contributions created a negative affectively valorized language-learning ecology. Our study demonstrates how educational and language policies as they are managed on the micro-interactional level in everyday preschool activities may cast children’s peer group as the main language socialization agent for beginners.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Mouton de Gruyter, 2017
Keywords
language socialisation, language policy, peer interaction, immigrant children, Swedish preschool
National Category
Educational Sciences Languages and Literature
Research subject
Education; Education
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-293642 (URN)10.1515/multi-2016-0020 (DOI)000412873300005 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 721-2011-5842
Available from: 2016-05-14 Created: 2016-05-14 Last updated: 2018-05-29Bibliographically approved
Evaldsson, A.-C. & Melander, H. (2017). Managing disruptive student conduct: Negative emotions and accountability in reproach-response sequences. Linguistics and Education, 37, 73-86
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Managing disruptive student conduct: Negative emotions and accountability in reproach-response sequences
2017 (English)In: Linguistics and Education, ISSN 0898-5898, E-ISSN 1873-1864, Vol. 37, p. 73-86Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Building on an ethnomethodological multimodal conversation analytic approach, this paper explores the normative character and interactional embodied organization of negative emotions, in particular displays of anger, in classroom situations in which a student refuses to comply with the teachers’ reproaches. We examine how embodied displays of negative affect and ascriptions of negative emotions work as procedures in teacher-student interactions for invoking issues of accountability and teacher authority for managing problematic classroom conduct. The analyses draw on a video ethnographic study in a special teaching class, tracing trajectories of reproach-response sequences in which a student repeatedly contests the moral ordering of classroom relations. It is found that non-compliant student responses are shaped as embodied affective stances through prosody, body postures, gestures, etc. that accentuate the student’s unwillingness to submit. The results show the dialogical organization of reproach-response sequences and the vulnerability of teacher reproaches to escalation of non-compliant student responses, here indexing aggressive acts as unjustifiable classroom conduct.

Keywords
negative emotions, accountability, reproach-response sequences, teacher-student interaction, classroom order, ethnomethodology, multimodality
National Category
Pedagogy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-282980 (URN)10.1016/j.linged.2016.05.001 (DOI)000394633000008 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2011-5756
Available from: 2016-04-08 Created: 2016-04-08 Last updated: 2017-04-25Bibliographically approved
Karlsson, M., Hjörne, E. & Evaldsson, A.-C. (2017). Preschool girls as rule breakers: Negotiating moral orders of justice and fairness. Childhood, 24(3), 396-415
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Preschool girls as rule breakers: Negotiating moral orders of justice and fairness
2017 (English)In: Childhood, ISSN 0907-5682, E-ISSN 1461-7013, Vol. 24, no 3, p. 396-415Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study examines how preschool-girls organize situated board games. Examining video data, using an ethnomethodological approach, the study focuses moral work-in-interaction in instances where the girls negotiate rule violations.  It was found that the girls oriented to diverse forms of moral orders, shifting between a competitive/justice-based order and a socio-moral order of reciprocal relations. Argumentative moves of cheating were used as communicative resources both to control moral transgressions and to gain personal advantages. Overall, the analysis shows that preschool girls are active moral agents in making and breaking rules and in negotiating complex moral orders. 

Keywords
Preschool girls, board games, moral work-in-interaction, rule violations, moral orders, children´s peer relations, legal debates, ethnomethodology
National Category
Social Sciences
Research subject
Education
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-293641 (URN)10.1177/0907568216678292 (DOI)000407128200009 ()
Available from: 2016-05-14 Created: 2016-05-14 Last updated: 2017-11-21Bibliographically approved
Hjörne, E. & Evaldsson, A.-C. (2016). Disability identities and category work in institutional practices: the case of ‘a typical ADHD girl’. In: Siân Preece (Ed.), The Routledge Handbook of Language and Identity : (pp. 386-411). Milton Park, Abingdon, Oxon: Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Disability identities and category work in institutional practices: the case of ‘a typical ADHD girl’
2016 (English)In: The Routledge Handbook of Language and Identity / [ed] Siân Preece, Milton Park, Abingdon, Oxon: Routledge, 2016, p. 386-411Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In this chapter, we draw on an ethnomethodological framework to examine how shifting forms of ‘disability identities’ (see Renshaw,Choo and emerald, 2013) are accomplished for Annika, a preadolescent girl diagnosed with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), during her first year in a special educational setting in Sweden. We make this argument by employing membership categorisation analysis (MCA) to investigate how different forms of identity categories are invoked and how the features and category attributes of those identities are negotiated and accumulated over time in everyday interactions (Antaki and Widdicombe 1998; Benwell and Stokoe this volume). We will analyse everyday interactions describing how Annika becomes identified as a ‘typical ADHD girl’ by teachers, parents and other pupils.

[i] Annika is a pseudonym.

 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Milton Park, Abingdon, Oxon: Routledge, 2016
Series
Routledge Handbooks in Applied Linguistics
Keywords
ADHD; gender; exclusion; special education; ethnomethodology; identity
National Category
Educational Sciences
Research subject
Education
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-293067 (URN)10.4324/9781315669816.ch25 (DOI)2-s2.0-84966930474 (Scopus ID)978-113877472-8 (print) (ISBN)978-131736523-5 (pdf) (ISBN)
Projects
En skola för avvikare:En studie av undervisningspraktiker och identitetsformering i särskilda undervisningsgrupper
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2011-5746
Available from: 2016-05-11 Created: 2016-05-11 Last updated: 2017-01-02Bibliographically approved
Evaldsson, A.-C. & Sahlström, F. (2016). ‘Naming the other’. Category memberships and practices of ‘Othering’ in children’s multiethnic peer group participation. In: P. Linell, Å. Mäkitalo & R. Säljö (Ed.), Memory Practices and Learning – Interactional, Institutional and Sociocultural perspectives: (pp. 49-72). Information Age Publishing: IAP Information Age Publishing
Open this publication in new window or tab >>‘Naming the other’. Category memberships and practices of ‘Othering’ in children’s multiethnic peer group participation
2016 (English)In: Memory Practices and Learning – Interactional, Institutional and Sociocultural perspectives / [ed] P. Linell, Å. Mäkitalo & R. Säljö, Information Age Publishing: IAP Information Age Publishing , 2016, p. 49-72Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In this chapter, we use a peer language socialization approach to account for how children make use of language and the body as cultural resources in everyday peer language practices for invoking and creatively transforming social boundaries and category memberships in culturally and ethnically diverse communities (Garrett, 2007; Goodwin & Kyratzis, 2014). Based on a large video ethnographic study of multilingual peer group interactions in two urban school settings in Finland and Sweden, we explore in detail the everyday peer group participation of an immigrant girl, Sara, with a Finnish-Swedish-African background (Evaldsson & Sahlström, 2014). In particular, we are interested in how category memberships, evaluative stances and subject positions associated with ethnic otherness become resources for children in multi-ethnic peer group settings to position themselves vis-à-vis others and differentiate themselves from certain groups of children (Evaldsson, 2005; Garciá-Sanchez, 2014; Goodwin, 2006; Goodwin & Alim, 2010). During the last few decades, several researchers have shown that language plays a pivotal role in the articulation of otherness in ethnically diverse communities, wherein the context of social and linguistic hierarchies and hegemonic ideologies, immigrants and other minorities may be marginalized and categorized as out-groups (cf. Garciá-Sanchez, 2014; Goodwin & Alim, 2010, for an overview). Little is known, however, about children’s agency in social practices of “othering” in terms of children’s ability to appropriate and negotiate as well as perpetuate broader cultural frameworks of social and ethnical hierarchies and inequalities in multi-ethnic settings.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Information Age Publishing: IAP Information Age Publishing, 2016
National Category
Social Sciences
Research subject
Education
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-293070 (URN)
Projects
Learning and Narrative remembering
Funder
Knut and Alice Wallenberg FoundationRiksbankens Jubileumsfond
Available from: 2016-05-11 Created: 2016-05-11 Last updated: 2017-05-04
Kontio, J. & Evaldsson, A.-C. (2015). ‘Last year we used to call it a Man’s Hammer’: (un)Doing masculinity in everyday use of working tools within vocational education.. International Journal of Masculinity Studies, 10(1), 20-38
Open this publication in new window or tab >>‘Last year we used to call it a Man’s Hammer’: (un)Doing masculinity in everyday use of working tools within vocational education.
2015 (English)In: International Journal of Masculinity Studies, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 20-38Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study focuses on how masculinity is oriented to in everyday interactions where both female and male students are learning how to use working tools in an auto mechanics environment in an upper secondary school in Sweden. Data are drawn from video-ethnographic work during two years in a beginner’s level workshop within a Vehicle engineering program. The study contributes to research on masculinity and technology. An ethnomethodological approach is taken in order to explore how gender is oriented to in everyday auto mechanic practices. It is demonstrated how the handling of auto mechanic devices in the beginning of term becomes associated with conventionalized understandings of what it means to be a man. However, when students start to work together in mixed gender teams any social actions that link auto mechanics with masculinity is downplayed or playfully challenged. We argue that the shifting enactments of gendered forms in everyday auto mechanic work suggest certain openness for future changes in the gendered relations of vocational practices.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Taylor & Francis Group, 2015
Keywords
Vocational Education, Masculinity, Auto Mechanics, Ethnomethodology, Doing Gender
National Category
Social Sciences
Research subject
Education
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-286684 (URN)
Available from: 2016-04-21 Created: 2016-04-21 Last updated: 2016-04-21
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