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Lagerlöf, I., Holte, H., Glimelius, I., Björkholm, M., Enblad, G., Erlanson, M., . . . Molin, D. (2020). No excess long-term mortality in stage I-IIA Hodgkin lymphoma patients treated with ABVD and limited field radiotherapy. British Journal of Haematology, 188(5), 685-691
Open this publication in new window or tab >>No excess long-term mortality in stage I-IIA Hodgkin lymphoma patients treated with ABVD and limited field radiotherapy
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2020 (English)In: British Journal of Haematology, ISSN 0007-1048, E-ISSN 1365-2141, Vol. 188, no 5, p. 685-691Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

When treating limited stage classical Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL), balancing treatment efficacy and toxicity is important. Toxicities after extended-field radiotherapy are well documented. Investigators have aimed at reducing toxicity without compromising efficacy, mainly by using combined modality treatment (CMT), i.e. chemotherapy and limited-field radiotherapy. In some clinical trials, radiotherapy has been omitted. We evaluated 364 patients with stage I-IIA cHL treated between 1999 and 2005. Patients were treated with two or four cycles of doxorubicin, bleomycin, vinblastine and dacarbazine (ABVD) according to presence of risk factors, followed by 30 Gy limited-field (reduced compared to involved-field) radiotherapy. After a median follow-up of 16 years for survival, freedom from progression at five and ten years was 93% and overall survival at 5 and 10 years was 98% and 96%, respectively. Only two relapses, out of 27, occurred after more than 5 years. There was no excess mortality compared to the general population. Of the analysed subgroups, only patients with progression within five years showed significant excess mortality. The absence of excess mortality questions the concept of omitting radiotherapy after short-term chemotherapy, a strategy that has been associated with an elevated risk of relapse but not yet with a proven reduced long-term excess mortality.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2020
Keywords
hodgkin lymphoma, limited stage, relative survival
National Category
Hematology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-397706 (URN)10.1111/bjh.16232 (DOI)000516520300015 ()31612478 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Cancer Society
Available from: 2019-11-23 Created: 2019-11-23 Last updated: 2020-03-30Bibliographically approved
Abdulla, M., Guglielmo, P., Hollander, P., Åström, G., Ahlström, H., Enblad, G. & Amini, R.-M. (2020). Prognostic impact of abdominal lymph node involvement in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. European Journal of Haematology, 104(3), 207-213
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Prognostic impact of abdominal lymph node involvement in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma
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2020 (English)In: European Journal of Haematology, ISSN 0902-4441, E-ISSN 1600-0609, Vol. 104, no 3, p. 207-213Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE: The prognostic value of site of nodal involvement in diffuse large B-cell lymphomas (DLBCL) is mainly unknown. We aimed to determine the prognostic significance of nodal abdominal involvement in relation to tumour cell markers and clinical characteristics of 249 DLBCL patients in a retrospective single-centre study.

METHODS: Contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) of the abdomen and thorax revealed pathologically enlarged abdominal lymph nodes in 156 patients, while in 93 patients there were no pathologically enlarged lymph nodes in the abdomen. In 81 cases, the diagnosis of DLBCL was verified by histopathological biopsy obtained from abdominal lymph node.

RESULTS: Patients with abdominal nodal disease had inferior lymphoma-specific survival (P = .04) and presented with higher age-adjusted IPI (P < .001), lactate dehydrogenase (P < .001) and more often advanced stage (P < .001), bulky disease (P < .001), B symptoms (P < .001), and double expression of MYC and BCL2 (P = .02) compared to patients without nodal abdominal involvement, but less often extranodal involvement (P < .02). The worst outcome was observed in those where the abdominal nodal involvement was verified by histopathological biopsy.

CONCLUSION: Diffuse large B-cell lymphomas patients with abdominal nodal disease had inferior outcome and more aggressive behaviour, reflected both in clinical and biological characteristics.

Keywords
BCL2, DLBCL, MYC, abdominal lymph node, survival
National Category
Clinical Laboratory Medicine
Research subject
Pathology; Pathology; Pathology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-400949 (URN)10.1111/ejh.13361 (DOI)000513873800007 ()31785002 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2020-01-03 Created: 2020-01-03 Last updated: 2020-04-01Bibliographically approved
Amini, R.-M., Enblad, G., Hollander, P., Laszlo, S., Eriksson, E., Gustafsson, K. A., . . . Thörn, I. (2019). Altered profile of immune regulatory cells in the peripheral blood of lymphoma patients. BMC Cancer, 19, Article ID 316.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Altered profile of immune regulatory cells in the peripheral blood of lymphoma patients
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2019 (English)In: BMC Cancer, ISSN 1471-2407, E-ISSN 1471-2407, Vol. 19, article id 316Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Regulatory immune cells may modulate the lymphoma microenvironment and are of great interest due to the increasing prevalence of treatment with immunotherapies in lymphoma patients. The aim was to explore the composition of different immune regulatory cell subsets in the peripheral blood of newly diagnosed lymphoma patients in relation to treatment outcome. Methods: Forty-three newly diagnosed patients with lymphoma were included in the study; 24 with high-grade B-cell lymphoma (HGBCL) and 19 with classical Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL). Peripheral blood was prospectively collected and immune regulatory cells were identified by multi-color flow cytometry and analyzed in relation to healthy blood donors and clinical characteristics and outcome. Results: The percentage of CD3-positive T-cells was lower (p=0.03) in the peripheral blood of lymphoma patients at diagnosis compared to healthy blood donors regardless of lymphoma subtype, although statistically, neither the percentage of monocytes (p=0.2) nor the T-cell/monocyte ratio (p=0.055) differed significantly. A significant decrease in the percentage of a subset of regulatory NK cells (CD7(+)/CD3(-)/CD56(bright)/CD16(dim/-)) was identified in the peripheral blood of lymphoma patients compared to healthy blood donors (p=0.003). Lymphoma patients also had more granulocytic myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) (p=0.003) compared to healthy blood donors, whereas monocytic MDSCs did not differ significantly (p=0.07). A superior disease-free survival was observed for cHL patients who had an increase in the percentage of granulocytic MDSCs (p=0.04). Conclusions: An altered profile of immune cells in the peripheral blood with a decrease in T-cells and regulatory NK-cells was observed in newly diagnosed lymphoma patients. CHL patients with higher percentages of regulatory NK cells and higher percentages of granulocytic MDSCs might have a better outcome, although the number of patients was low.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BMC, 2019
Keywords
Immune regulatory cells, NK cells, T cells, Myeloid derived suppressor cells, High-grade B cell lymphoma, Hodgkin lymphoma
National Category
Cancer and Oncology Clinical Laboratory Medicine
Research subject
Pathology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-382563 (URN)10.1186/s12885-019-5529-0 (DOI)000463739000007 ()30953461 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-05-03 Created: 2019-05-03 Last updated: 2020-01-03Bibliographically approved
Mörth, C., Valachis, A., Sabaa, A. A., Marshall, K., Hedström, G., Flogegård, M., . . . Enblad, G. (2019). Autoimmune disease in patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma: occurrence and impact on outcome. Acta Oncologica, 58(8), 1170-1177
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Autoimmune disease in patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma: occurrence and impact on outcome
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2019 (English)In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 58, no 8, p. 1170-1177Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Patients with certain autoimmune diseases (AID) have an increased risk of developing diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). However, the occurrence of AID in patients with DLBCL as well as the impact of AID on outcome has not been extensively studied. The main purpose of this study was to establish the occurrence of AIDs in a population-based cohort of DLBCL patients and to compare outcomes in patients with or without AID treated with rituximab(R)-CHOP/CHOP-like treatment. We also aimed to analyse gender differences and the potential role of different AIDs on outcome and the frequency of treatment-associated neutropenic fever.

Patients and methods: All adult patients treated 2000–2013 with R-CHOP/CHOP-like treatment for DLBCL in four counties of Sweden were included (n = 612). Lymphoma characteristics, outcome and the presence of AID were obtained through medical records.

Results: The number of patients with AID was 106 (17.3%). Thyroid disease dominated (n = 33, 31.1%) followed by rheumatoid arthritis (RA) (n = 24, 22.6%). The proportion of AID was significantly higher in females (59/254, 23.2%) vs. in males (47/358, 13.1%) (p = .001). In the whole cohort there was no difference in event free survival (EFS) or overall survival (OS) between patients with or without AID. However, patients with an AID primarily mediated by B-cell responses (thyroid disorders excluded) had a worse OS (p = .037), which seemed to affect only women. The AID group more often had neutropenic fever after first treatment (16.0% vs 8.7%, p = .034) and those with neutropenic fever had a worse OS (p = .026) in Kaplan-Meier analyses.

Conclusion: There is a high prevalence of AID among patients with DLBCL. AIDs categorized as primarily B-cell mediated (in this study mainly RA, systemic lupus erythematosus and Sjögren’s syndrome) may be associated with inferior OS. AID patients may be more prone to neutropenic fever compared to patients without concomitant AID.

National Category
Cancer and Oncology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-384705 (URN)10.1080/0284186X.2019.1619936 (DOI)000469744800001 ()31131659 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-06-07 Created: 2019-06-07 Last updated: 2019-11-20Bibliographically approved
Kinch, A., Sundström, C., Baecklund, E., Backlin, C., Molin, D. & Enblad, G. (2019). Expression of PD-1, PD-L1, and PD-L2 in posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder after solid organ transplantation. Leukemia and Lymphoma, 60(2), 376-384
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Expression of PD-1, PD-L1, and PD-L2 in posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder after solid organ transplantation
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2019 (English)In: Leukemia and Lymphoma, ISSN 1042-8194, E-ISSN 1029-2403, Vol. 60, no 2, p. 376-384Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We studied the expression of programed death 1 (PD-1) receptor and its ligands (PD-L1/-L2) by immunohistochemistry and its association with clinicopathological features in 81 posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLDs) following solid organ transplantation. Overall, 67% (54/81) of the PTLDs were positive in any of the three immunostainings. PD-1 was detected on tumor-infiltrating cells in 41% (33/81) of the PTLDs. PD-L1 was expressed on ≥5% of the tumor cells in 50% (40/80) and PD-L2 in 32% (23/72) of the PTLDs. All Burkitt lymphomas were PD-L1 negative. Expression of PD-L1 tended to be associated with non-germinal center-type of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (63% vs. 33% in GC-type, p = .14) and latent membrane protein-1+ PTLD (76% vs. 44% in LPM1-, p = .09). Heart recipients had more frequent PTLDs with PD-1+ microenvironment (p = .01). The frequent expression of PD-1 or -L1/-L2 in PTLD warrants further clinical evaluation of the efficacy and safety of PD-(L)1 inhibitors for refractory PTLD.

Keywords
LMP1, PTLD, lymphoma, programed death protein 1, solid organ transplantation, tumor microenvironment
National Category
Cancer and Oncology Clinical Laboratory Medicine
Research subject
Oncology; Pathology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-365801 (URN)10.1080/10428194.2018.1480767 (DOI)000463555600014 ()30033844 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Cancer Society
Available from: 2018-11-14 Created: 2018-11-14 Last updated: 2020-01-08Bibliographically approved
Pedersen, M. A., Gormsen, L. C., Kamper, P., Wassberg, C., Andersen, M. D., d'Amore, A. L., . . . d'Amore, F. (2019). Focal skeletal FDG uptake indicates poor prognosis in cHL regardless of extent and first-line chemotherapy. British Journal of Haematology, 186(3), 431-439
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Focal skeletal FDG uptake indicates poor prognosis in cHL regardless of extent and first-line chemotherapy
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2019 (English)In: British Journal of Haematology, ISSN 0007-1048, E-ISSN 1365-2141, Vol. 186, no 3, p. 431-439Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

F-18-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) is used for staging classical Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL) with high sensitivity for skeletal involvement. However, it is unclear whether a single bone lesion carries the same adverse prognosis as multifocal lesions and if this is affected by type of chemotherapy [ABVD (adriamycin, bleomycin, vincristine, dacarbazine) versus BEACOPP (bleomycin, etoposide, adriamycin, cyclophosphamide, vincristine, procarbazine, prednisone)]. We reviewed the clinico-pathological and outcome data from 209 patients with newly diagnosed cHL staged by FDG-PET/CT. Patterns of skeletal/bone marrow uptake (BMU) were divided into 'low' and 'high' diffuse BMU (i.e. without focal lesions), and unifocal or multifocal lesions. Additional separate survival analysis was performed, taking type of chemotherapy into account. Forty patients (19 center dot 2%) had skeletal lesions (20 unifocal, 20 multifocal). The 3-year progression-free-survival (PFS) was 80% for patients with 'low BMU', 87% for 'high BMU', 69% for 'unifocal' and 51% for 'multifocal' lesions; median follow-up was 38 months. The presence of bone lesions, both uni- and multifocal, was associated with significantly inferior PFS (log rank P = 0 center dot 0001), independent of chemotherapy type. Thus, increased diffuse BMU should not be considered as a risk factor in cHL, whereas unifocal or multifocal bone lesions should be regarded as important predictors of adverse outcome, irrespective of the chemotherapy regimen used.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
WILEY, 2019
Keywords
F-18-FDG PET, CT, classical Hodgkin lymphoma, bone marrow uptake, focal bone lesions, chemotherapy
National Category
Hematology Cancer and Oncology Clinical Laboratory Medicine
Research subject
Pathology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-393747 (URN)10.1111/bjh.15933 (DOI)000481501200007 ()31115045 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-11-11 Created: 2019-11-11 Last updated: 2020-01-03Bibliographically approved
Gholiha, A. R., Hollander, P., Hedström, G., Sundström, C., Molin, D., Smedby, K. E., . . . Enblad, G. (2019). High tumour plasma cell infiltration reflects an important microenvironmental component in classic Hodgkin lymphoma linked to presence of B-symptoms. British Journal of Haematology, 184(2), 192-201
Open this publication in new window or tab >>High tumour plasma cell infiltration reflects an important microenvironmental component in classic Hodgkin lymphoma linked to presence of B-symptoms
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2019 (English)In: British Journal of Haematology, ISSN 0007-1048, E-ISSN 1365-2141, Vol. 184, no 2, p. 192-201Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Plasma cells are important prognostic actors in different malignancies. The tumour microenvironmental composition in classic Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL) is a major prognostic key element; however, clinicopathological studies regarding plasma cells in cHL are lacking. The aim of this study was to investigate CD138+ (also termed SDC1+) plasma cell and IgG4 producing (IgG4+) plasma cells infiltration in the microenvironment of cHL. Immunohistochemistry with anti-CD138 and IgG4 antibodies was performed on diagnostic tumour biopsies from 124 patients with cHL, on tissue micro array (TMA). In 120 cases, CD138+ plasma cell-infiltration was associated with the presence of B-symptoms (P = 0·028) and advanced stage, IIB-IVB (P = 0·009). In multivariate analysis, CD138+ plasma cells correlated with eosinophil infiltration (P = 0·013). The subgroup of IgG4+ plasma cells was analysed in 122 cases and only correlated to CD138+ plasma cells (P = 0·004). Patients with high proportion of tumour infiltrating CD138+ plasma cells (defined as ≥10%), had a more inferior event-free survival (P = 0·007) and overall survival (P = 0·004) than patients with a low proportion of infiltrating CD138+ plasma cells (<10%), although significance was not maintained in multivariate analysis. In summary, a high proportion of tumour-associated plasma cells in cHL reflect an important component in the microenvironment of cHL.

Keywords
CD138 plasma cells, Hodgkin's lymphoma, IgG4-producing plasma cells, Syndecan-1, tumour microenvironment
National Category
Cancer and Oncology Clinical Laboratory Medicine
Research subject
Pathology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-372809 (URN)10.1111/bjh.15703 (DOI)000455218700009 ()30506671 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-01-09 Created: 2019-01-09 Last updated: 2020-01-08Bibliographically approved
Hellbacher, E., Hjorton, K., Backlin, C., Enblad, G., Sundström, C., Baecklund, E. & Knight, A. (2019). Malignant lymphoma in granulomatosis with polyangiitis: subtypes, clinical characteristics and prognosis [Letter to the editor]. Acta Oncologica, 58(11), 1655-1659
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Malignant lymphoma in granulomatosis with polyangiitis: subtypes, clinical characteristics and prognosis
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2019 (English)In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 58, no 11, p. 1655-1659Article in journal, Letter (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

Several autoimmune and inflammatory conditions, such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and primary Sjögrens’s syndrome (pSS), have repeatedly been linked to an increased risk of malignant lymphoma [1,2]. Certain inflammatory conditions are also associated with the development of specific lymphoma subtypes such as mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma in pSS and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) in RA. The underlying mechanisms behind this association remain unclear. The highly increased risk of developing MALT lymphoma of the parotid gland in pSS indicates that local inflammatory processes can promote lymphoma development at the site of chronic inflammation [3]. In RA, an association between disease severity and risk of lymphoma has been shown.

Granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA), formerly Wegener’s granulomatosis, is a systemic small vessel vasculitis associated with the presence of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) and characterized by granulomatous inflammation and necrotizing vasculitis of the airways and kidneys but possibly affecting any organ system. An increased risk of lymphoma in patients with GPA has been reported in several epidemiological studies [4,5]. However, very little is known about risk factors for lymphoma development in this group, possible relation to disease severity, treatment and lymphoma subtypes or the prognosis for the lymphomas. This is the first published study on GPA and lymphoma, giving detailed information on the GPA characteristics and possible risk factors for lymphoma and also lymphoma subtypes treatment and survival.

National Category
Cancer and Oncology Clinical Laboratory Medicine
Research subject
Pathology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-398532 (URN)10.1080/0284186X.2019.1634833 (DOI)000481027700001 ()31407922 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Cancer Society
Available from: 2019-12-06 Created: 2019-12-06 Last updated: 2020-01-08Bibliographically approved
Niinivirta, M., Enblad, G., Lindskog, C., Pontén, F., Dragomir, A. & Ullenhag, G. (2019). Tumoral pyruvate kinase L/R as a predictive marker for the treatment of renal cancer patients with sunitinib and sorafenib. Journal of Cancer, 10(14), 3224-3231
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Tumoral pyruvate kinase L/R as a predictive marker for the treatment of renal cancer patients with sunitinib and sorafenib
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2019 (English)In: Journal of Cancer, ISSN 1837-9664, Vol. 10, no 14, p. 3224-3231Article in journal (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

Background and aims: Treatment with tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) like sunitinib and sorafenib has improved the prognosis of patients with metastatic renal cell cancer (mRCC). No predictive marker is available to select patients who will gain from these treatments. Tumoral pyruvate kinase L/R (PKLR) is a membrane protein with highly specific expression in the renal tubule. We have previously shown that the tumoral expression of cubilin (CUBN) is associated with progression free survival (PFS) in mRCC patients treated with sunitinib and sorafenib. The aim of the present study was to investigate if PKLR can predict response in these patients, alone and/or in combination with CUBN.

Methods: A tissue microarray (TMA) was constructed of tumor samples from 139 mRCC patients. One hundred and thirty-six of these patients had been treated with sunitinib or sorafenib in the first or second-line setting. Thirty patients suffered from early severe toxicity leading to the termination of treatment. The remaining patients (n=106) were selected for the current study.

Results: Fifty-five (52%) of the tumors expressed membranous PKLR. Patients with PKLR tumor expression experienced a significantly longer PFS compared to patients with no expression (eight versus five months, p = 0.019). Overall survival (OS) was also significantly better for patients with PKLR expression. In addition, the combined expression of PKLR and CUBN resulted in a higher predictive value than either marker alone.

Conclusions: In this real world study we show that tumoral PKLR membrane expression is a positive predictive biomarker for sunitinib and sorafenib treatment in patients suffering from mRCC. Our results also indicate that the combined expression with cubilin more accurately than PKLR alone can select patients with no benefit from treatment.

National Category
Cancer and Oncology Clinical Laboratory Medicine
Research subject
Oncology; Pathology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-360611 (URN)10.7150/jca.30130 (DOI)000470088200017 ()
Funder
Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation
Available from: 2018-09-16 Created: 2018-09-16 Last updated: 2020-01-08Bibliographically approved
Enblad, G., Karlsson, H., Gammelgård, G., Wenthe, J., Lövgren, T., Amini, R.-M., . . . Loskog, A. (2018). A Phase I/IIa Trial Using CD19-Targeted Third-Generation CAR T Cells for Lymphoma and Leukemia. Clinical Cancer Research, 24(24), 6185-6194
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Phase I/IIa Trial Using CD19-Targeted Third-Generation CAR T Cells for Lymphoma and Leukemia
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2018 (English)In: Clinical Cancer Research, ISSN 1078-0432, E-ISSN 1557-3265, Vol. 24, no 24, p. 6185-6194Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: The chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapy has been effective for patients with CD19(+) B-cell malignancies. Most studies have investigated the second-generation CARs with either CD28 or 4-1BB costimulatory domains in the CAR receptor. Here, we describe the first clinical phase I/IIa trial using third-generation CAR T cells targeting CD19 to evaluate safety and efficacy.

Patients and Methods: Fifteen patients with B-cell lymphoma or leukemia were treated with CAR T cells. The patients with lymphoma received chemotherapy during CAR manufacture and 11 of 15 were given low-dose cyclophosphamide and fludarabine conditioning prior to CAR infusion. Peripheral blood was sampled before and at multiple time points after CAR infusion to evaluate the persistence of CAR T cells and for immune profiling, using quantitative PCR, flow cytometry, and a proteomic array.

Results: Treatment with third-generation CAR T cells was generally safe with 4 patients requiring hospitalization due to adverse reactions. Six of the 15 patients had initial complete responses [4/11 lymphoma and 2/4 acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL)], and 3 of the patients with lymphoma were in remission at 3 months. Two patients are still alive. Best predictor of response was a good immune status prior to CAR infusion with high IL12, DC-Lamp, Fas ligand, and TRAIL. Responding patients had low monocytic myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs; CD14(+)CD33(+)HLA(-)DR(-)) and low levels of IL6, IL8, NAP3, sPDL1, and sPDL2.

Conclusions: Third-generation CARs may be efficient in patients with advanced B-cell lymphoproliferative malignancy with only modest toxicity. Immune profiling pre- and posttreatment can be used to find response biomarkers.

National Category
Cancer and Oncology Hematology Clinical Laboratory Medicine
Research subject
Pathology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-372924 (URN)10.1158/1078-0432.CCR-18-0426 (DOI)000453267600012 ()30097433 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research CouncilAFA InsuranceSwedish Cancer Society
Available from: 2019-01-10 Created: 2019-01-10 Last updated: 2019-03-29Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-0594-724x

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