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Vingård, Eva
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Publications (10 of 51) Show all publications
Helgesson, M., Johansson, B., Vingård, E. & Svartengren, M. (2018). The Healthy Migrant Effect among migrants to Sweden. Paper presented at 1st World Congress on Migration, Ethnicity, Race and Health, 17-19 May 2018, Edinburgh, UK. European Journal of Public Health, 28(Supplement: 1), 19-19
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Healthy Migrant Effect among migrants to Sweden
2018 (English)In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 28, no Supplement: 1, p. 19-19Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2018
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-359381 (URN)10.1093/eurpub/cky047.002 (DOI)000432430700045 ()
Conference
1st World Congress on Migration, Ethnicity, Race and Health, 17-19 May 2018, Edinburgh, UK
Note

Meeting Abstract: 1.1-O2

Available from: 2018-09-17 Created: 2018-09-17 Last updated: 2018-09-17Bibliographically approved
Ghaffari, M., Alinaghizadeh, H., Ghalichi, L., Pournik, O. & Vingård, E. (2017). Assessment of the Psychosocial Work Environment among Health Care Workers and Its Association with Work and Socioeconomic Status. Archives of neuroscience, 3, Article ID UNSP e13576.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Assessment of the Psychosocial Work Environment among Health Care Workers and Its Association with Work and Socioeconomic Status
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2017 (English)In: Archives of neuroscience, ISSN 2322-3944, Vol. 3, article id UNSP e13576Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: The health care sector constitutes one of the largest sources of employment worldwide.

Objective: The aim of this study was to describe the psychosocial status of health care workers and its association with different covariates.

Methods: Health care workers from different universities, hospitals, clinics, urban and rural health centers took part in this cross-sectional study. The medium version of COPSOQ was used to evaluate the association between COPSOQ and covariates. The multivariate analyses of variance and covariance were employed to determine multivariate and univariate associations between all psychosocial dimensions and covariates.

Results: Most COPSOQ scores showed a good internal consistency and reliability, with total Cronbach’s alpha of 0.76. The study population comprised 7,027 health care workers among whom 64% were female. The results indicated that nurses are more exposed to the psychosocial work environment compared to the other groups of workers within the health care settings.

Conclusions: Nurses had a significantly higher risk regarding almost all the psychosocial factors. Considering that the main shortage of human resources in our study population belonged to the nursing group, this bad situation is not surprising. Healthcare workers, especially nurses, are facing various psychosocial factors more than other workers are, because all these factors are in the healthcare environment at the same time.

National Category
Neurosciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-336134 (URN)10.5812/archneurosci.13576 (DOI)000418502600004 ()
Available from: 2017-12-12 Created: 2017-12-12 Last updated: 2018-01-19Bibliographically approved
Bergsten, E. L., Mathiassen, S. E., Kwak, L. & Vingård, E. (2017). Daily shoulder pain among flight baggage handlers and its association with work tasks and upper arm postures on the same day. Annals of Occupational Hygiene, 61(9), 1145-1153
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Daily shoulder pain among flight baggage handlers and its association with work tasks and upper arm postures on the same day
2017 (English)In: Annals of Occupational Hygiene, ISSN 0003-4878, E-ISSN 1475-3162, Vol. 61, no 9, p. 1145-1153Article in journal (Refereed) Submitted
Abstract [en]

Objectives

This study of flight baggage handlers aimed at examining the extent to which shoulder pain developed during single work shifts, and whether a possible development was associated with biomechanical exposures and psychosocial factors during the same shift.

Methods

Data were collected during, in total, 82 work shifts in 44 workers. Right and left shoulder pain intensity was rated just before and just after the shift (VAS scale 0–100 mm). Objective data on ‘time in extreme’ and ‘time in neutral’ upper arm postures were obtained for the full shift using accelerometers, and the baggage handlers registered the number of ‘aircrafts handled’ in a diary. During half of the shift, workers were recorded on video for subsequent task analysis of baggage handling. ‘Influence’ at work and ‘support’ from colleagues were measured by use of Copenhagen Psychosocial Questionnaire (COPSOQ). Associations between exposures and the increase in pain intensity during the shift (‘daily pain’) were analysed for the right and left shoulder separately using Generalized Estimating Equations (GEE).

Results

‘Daily pain’ was observed in approximately one third of all shifts. It was significantly associated with the number of ‘aircrafts handled’ for both the right and left shoulder. In multivariate models including both biomechanical exposures and the psychosocial factors ‘influence’ at work and ‘support’ from colleagues, ‘aircrafts handled’ was still significantly associated with ‘daily pain’ in both shoulders, and so was ‘influence’ and ‘support’, however in opposite directions.

Conclusions

‘Daily pain’ was, in general, associated with biomechanical exposures during the same shift and with general ‘influence’ and ‘support’ in the job. In an effort to reduce pain among flight baggage handlers, it may therefore be justified to consider a reduction of biomechanical exposures during handling of aircrafts, combined with due attention to psychosocial factors at work.

National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-316463 (URN)10.1093/annweh/wxx073 (DOI)000417609300010 ()29136416 (PubMedID)
Funder
AFA Insurance, 100071Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2009-1761
Available from: 2017-03-01 Created: 2017-03-01 Last updated: 2018-03-09Bibliographically approved
Theorell, T., Jood, K., Jarvholm, L. S., Vingård, E., Perk, J., Ostergren, P. O. & Hall, C. (2016). A systematic review of studies in the contributions of the work environment to ischaemic heart disease development. European Journal of Public Health, 26(3), 470-477
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A systematic review of studies in the contributions of the work environment to ischaemic heart disease development
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2016 (English)In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 26, no 3, p. 470-477Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: There is need for an updated systematic review of associations between occupational exposures and ischaemic heart disease (IHD), using the GRADE system. Methods: Inclusion criteria: (i) publication in English in peer-reviewed journal between 1985 and 2014, (ii) quantified relationship between occupational exposure (psychosocial, organizational, physical and other ergonomic job factors) and IHD outcome, (iii) cohort studies with at least 1000 participants or comparable case-control studies with at least 50 + 50 participants, (iv) assessments of exposure and outcome at baseline as well as at follow-up and (v) gender and age analysis. Relevance and quality were assessed using predefined criteria. Level of evidence was then assessed using the GRADE system. Consistency of findings was examined for a number of confounders. Possible publication bias was discussed. Results: Ninety-six articles of high or medium high scientific quality were finally included. There was moderately strong evidence (grade 3 out of 4) for a relationship between job strain and small decision latitude on one hand and IHD incidence on the other hand. Limited evidence (grade 2) was found for iso-strain, pressing work, effort-reward imbalance, low support, lack of justice, lack of skill discretion, insecure employment, night work, long working week and noise in relation to IHD. No difference between men and women with regard to the effect of adverse job conditions on IHD incidence. Conclusions: There is scientific evidence that employees, both men and women, who report specific occupational exposures, such as low decision latitude, job strain or noise, have an increased incidence of IHD.

National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-299972 (URN)10.1093/eurpub/ckw025 (DOI)000377470800024 ()27032996 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-08-01 Created: 2016-08-01 Last updated: 2017-11-28Bibliographically approved
Helgesson, M., Johansson, B., Wernroth, M.-L. & Vingård, E. (2016). Exposure to different lengths of sick leave and subsequent work absence among young adults. BMC Public Health, 16, Article ID 51.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Exposure to different lengths of sick leave and subsequent work absence among young adults
2016 (English)In: BMC Public Health, ISSN 1471-2458, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 16, article id 51Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Sweden has a public and easily accessible sickness insurance. Research shows, however, downsides to taking sick leave. Both short and longer periods of sick leave have been seen to increase the risk for subsequent work absence. The aim of this study was to investigate whether there was an association between sick leave claimed in 1993 and work absence in the subsequent 15 years, i.e. up to 2008. A further aim was to explore differences in this relation with regard to gender, origin and educational level at baseline. Methods: Our cohort consisted of all immigrants aged 21-25 years in Sweden in 1993 and a control group of native Swedes in the same age group. Results: Subsequent work absence increased from 313 days among persons with no days of claimed sick leave in 1993 to 567 days among persons with 1-7 days of claimed sick leave in 1993. Thereafter there was a lower, but steady increase in days of future work absence, to 611 days among persons with 8-14 days of sick leave claimed in 1993. There was an interaction between sick leave and gender, education and origin respectively regarding later work absence. Conclusion: Periods of sick leave claimed were associated with subsequent work absence. Immigrants, women and persons with low education had the most risk of future work absence after a period of sick leave.

Keywords
Sick leave, Unemployment, Disability pension, Immigrants, Social insurance, Work absence
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-277790 (URN)10.1186/s12889-015-2679-0 (DOI)000368396500001 ()26792668 (PubMedID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare
Available from: 2016-02-23 Created: 2016-02-23 Last updated: 2018-01-10Bibliographically approved
Palmlof, L., Holm, L. W., Alfredsson, L., Magnusson, C., Vingård, E. & Skillgate, E. (2016). The impact of work related physical activity and leisure physical activity on the risk and prognosis of neck pain: a population based cohort study on workers. BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, 17, Article ID 219.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The impact of work related physical activity and leisure physical activity on the risk and prognosis of neck pain: a population based cohort study on workers
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2016 (English)In: BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, ISSN 1471-2474, E-ISSN 1471-2474, Vol. 17, article id 219Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: The effect of physical activity on risk and prognosis for neck pain has been studied earlier with inconclusive results. There is a need for large prospective studies on the subject. The aim of this study was to investigate if work related physical activity and physical activity during leisure time are of importance for the risk and prognosis of neck pain in men and women. Methods: We used the Stockholm Public Health Cohort and formed two sub-cohorts of the working population based on data from 2002. Cohort I (risk cohort) included persons without neck pain (n = 4681), and cohort II (prognostic cohort) included persons with occasional neck pain (n = 6820) during the previous six months. Both cohorts were assessed for the outcome long duration troublesome neck pain (LDNP) in 2007. The exposures and potential confounders were assessed through a questionnaire in 2002. The question regarding work related physical activity over the past 12 months had five answering categories ranging from "sedentary" to "heavy". The question regarding leisure physical activity for the past 12 months had five answering categories ranging from "sedentary" to "regular physical activity". LDNP in 2007 was defined as having had troublesome neck pain lasting >= 3 consecutive months during the previous five years. Associations between work related physical activity and LDNP, as well as leisure physical activity and LDNP, were investigated by multivariable logistic regression, considering potential confounding factors. Results: In cohort I (risk cohort) we found an association between leisure physical activity and LDNP. In cohort II (prognostic cohort) we found no association between the exposures and the outcome. Conclusion: The results suggest that leisure physical activity has a protective effect on the risk of developing LDNP in a population free from neck pain. It did not, however, affect the prognosis of occasional neck pain. Neither the risk nor the prognosis of neck pain was affected by work related physical activity in this study.

Keywords
Epidemiology, Neck pain, Prognosis, Risk factor, Physical activity, Cohort study, Longitudinal study
National Category
Rheumatology and Autoimmunity Orthopaedics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-298903 (URN)10.1186/s12891-016-1080-1 (DOI)000377243500001 ()27206535 (PubMedID)
Funder
Stockholm County CouncilForte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare
Available from: 2016-07-12 Created: 2016-07-12 Last updated: 2018-01-10Bibliographically approved
Alinaghizadeh, H., Wålinder, R., Vingård, E. & Tondel, M. (2016). Total cancer incidence in relation to 137Cs fallout in the most contaminated counties in Sweden after the Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident: a register-based study. BMJ Open, 6(12), Article ID e011924.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Total cancer incidence in relation to 137Cs fallout in the most contaminated counties in Sweden after the Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident: a register-based study
2016 (English)In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 6, no 12, article id e011924Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVES: To determine the total cancer incidence in relation to a 5-year exposure to caesium-137 ((137)Cs) from the 1986 Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident.

METHODS: A closed cohort was defined as all individuals living in the three most contaminated counties in mid-Sweden in 1986. Fallout of (137)Cs was retrieved as a digital map from the Geological Survey of Sweden, demographic data from Statistics Sweden, and cancer diagnosis from the National Board of Health and Welfare. Individuals were assigned an annual (137)Cs exposure based on their place of residence (1986-1990), from which 5-year cumulative (137)Cs exposures were calculated, accounting for the physical decay of (137)Cs and changing residencies. HRs were adjusted for age, sex, rural/non-rural residence and pre-Chernobyl total cancer incidence.

RESULTS: The 734 537 people identified were categorised by exposure: the first quartile was low exposure (0.0-45.4 kBq/m(2)), the second and third quartiles were intermediate exposure (45.41-118.8 kBq/m(2)), and the fourth quartile was the highest exposure (118.81-564.71 kBq/m(2)). Between 1991 and 2010, 82 495 cancer cases were registered in the 3 counties. Adjusted HRs (95% CI) were 1.03 (1.01 to 1.05) for intermediate exposure and 1.05 (1.03 to 1.07) for the highest exposure compared to the reference exposure.

CONCLUSIONS: We found a small overall exposure-response pattern of the total cancer incidence related to (137)Cs after adjustment for age, sex, rural residence and pre-Chernobyl cancer incidence.

National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-311895 (URN)10.1136/bmjopen-2016-011924 (DOI)000391303600003 ()27998898 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-01-03 Created: 2017-01-03 Last updated: 2018-01-13Bibliographically approved
Bergsten, E. L., Mathiassen, S. E. & Vingård, E. (2015). Psychosocial Work Factors and Musculoskeletal Pain: A Cross-Sectional Study among Swedish Flight Baggage Handlers. BioMed Research International, Article ID 798042.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Psychosocial Work Factors and Musculoskeletal Pain: A Cross-Sectional Study among Swedish Flight Baggage Handlers
2015 (English)In: BioMed Research International, ISSN 2314-6133, E-ISSN 2314-6141, article id 798042Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective. Flight baggage handlers sort and load luggage to airplanes. This study aimed at investigating associations between psychosocial exposures and low back and shoulder musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) among Swedish flight baggage handlers. Methods. A questionnaire addressing MSDs (Standardized Nordic Questionnaire) and psychosocial factors (Copenhagen Psychosocial Questionnaire, COPSOQ) was answered by 525 baggage handlers in six Swedish airports. Results. Low back (LBP) and shoulder pain (SP) were reported by 70% and 60%, respectively. Pain was reported to interfere with work (PIW) by 30% (low back) and 18% (shoulders), and intense pain (PINT) occurred in 34% and 28% of the population. Quality of leadership was the most dissatisfying psychosocial factor, while the most positive was social community at work. Low ratings in the combined domain Work organization and job content were significantly associated with PIW in both low back and shoulders (Adjusted Hazard Ratios 3.65 (95% CI 1.67-7.99) and 2.68 (1.09-6.61)) while lower ratings in the domain Interpersonal relations and leadership were associated with PIWLBP (HR 2.18 (1.06-4.49)) and PINT LBP and SP (HRs 1.95 (1.05-3.65) and 2.11 (1.08-4.12)). Conclusion. Severity of pain among flight baggage handlers was associated with psychosocial factors at work, suggesting that they may be a relevant target for intervention in this occupation.

National Category
Occupational Therapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-268722 (URN)10.1155/2015/798042 (DOI)000364083100001 ()
Funder
AFA Insurance, Dnr 2010/358Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, Forte Dnr. 2009-1761
Available from: 2015-12-09 Created: 2015-12-09 Last updated: 2017-12-01Bibliographically approved
Helgesson, M., Johansson, B., Nordqvist, T., Lundberg, I. & Vingård, E. (2015). Sickness absence at a young age and later sickness absence, disability pension, death, unemployment and income in native Swedes and immigrants. European Journal of Public Health, 25(4), 688-692
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sickness absence at a young age and later sickness absence, disability pension, death, unemployment and income in native Swedes and immigrants
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2015 (English)In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 25, no 4, p. 688-692Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Sickness absence with cash benefits from the sickness insurance gives an opportunity to be relieved from work without losing financial security. There are, however, downsides to taking sickness absence. Periods of sickness absence, even short ones, can increase the risk for future spells of sickness absence and unemployment. The sickness period may in itself have a detrimental effect on health. The aim of the study was to investigate if there is an association between exposure to sickness absence at a young age and later sickness absence, disability pension, death, unemployment and income from work. Methods: Our cohort consisted of all immigrants aged 21-25 years in Sweden in 1993 (N=38 207) and a control group of native Swedes in the same age group (N=225 977). We measured exposure to sickness absence in 1993 with a follow-up period of 15 years. We conducted separate analyses for men and women, and for immigrants and native Swedes. Results: Exposure to >= 60 days of sickness absence in 1993 increased the risk of sickness absence [hazard ratio (HR) 1.6-11.4], unemployment (HR 1.1-1.2), disability pension (HR 1.2-5.3) and death (HR 1.2-3.5). The income from work, during the follow-up period, among individuals with spells of sick leave for >= 60 days in 1993 was around two-thirds of that of the working population who did not take sick leave. Conclusions: Individuals on sickness absence had an increased risk for work absence, death and lower future income.

National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-261250 (URN)10.1093/eurpub/cku250 (DOI)000359159900029 ()25634955 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2015-09-01 Created: 2015-08-31 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved
Bohman, T., Alfredsson, L., Jensen, I., Hallqvist, J., Vingård, E. & Skillgate, E. (2014). Does a healthy lifestyle behaviour influence the prognosis of low back pain among men and women in a general population? A population-based cohort study. BMJ Open, 4(12), Article ID e005713.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Does a healthy lifestyle behaviour influence the prognosis of low back pain among men and women in a general population? A population-based cohort study
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2014 (English)In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 4, no 12, article id e005713Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVES:

To study the influence of healthy lifestyle behaviour on the prognosis of occasional low back pain among men and women in a general population.

DESIGN:

Cohort study with a 4-year follow-up.

SETTINGS:

General population in Stockholm County, Sweden.

PARTICIPANTS:

The study sample comprised 3938 men and 5056 women aged 18-84 from the Stockholm Public Health Cohort reporting occasional low back pain in the baseline questionnaire 2006.

MEASURES:

Lifestyle factors and potential confounders were assessed at baseline. The lifestyle factors smoking habits, alcohol consumption, leisure physical activity and consumption of fruit and vegetables were dichotomised using recommendations for a health-enhancing lifestyle and combined to form the exposure variable 'healthy lifestyle behaviour'. The exposure was categorised into five levels according to the number of healthy lifestyle factors met. The follow-up questionnaire in 2010 gave information about the outcome, long duration troublesome low back pain. Crude and adjusted binomial regression models were applied to estimate the association between the exposure and the outcome analysing men and women separately.

RESULTS:

The risk of developing long duration troublesome low back pain among women with occasional low back pain decreased with increasing healthy lifestyle behaviour (trend test: p=0.006). 21% (28/131) among women with no healthy lifestyle factor (reference) experienced the outcome compared to 9% (36/420) among women with all four factors. Compared to the reference group, the risk was reduced by 35% (RR 0.65, 95% CI 0.44 to 0.96) for women with one healthy lifestyle factor and 52% (RR 0.48, 95% CI 0.31 to 0.77) for women with all four healthy lifestyle factors. There were no clear associations found among men.

CONCLUSIONS:

Healthy lifestyle behaviour seems to decrease the risk of developing long duration troublesome low back pain among women with occasional low back pain and may be recommended to improve the prognosis.

National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-240341 (URN)10.1136/bmjopen-2014-005713 (DOI)000355413900016 ()25550292 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2015-01-07 Created: 2015-01-07 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved
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