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Juslin, Patrik N
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 104) Show all publications
Sakka, L. & Juslin, P. N. (2018). Emotion regulation with music in depressed and non-depressed individuals: goals, strategies, and mechanisms. Music & Science, 1, 1-12
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Emotion regulation with music in depressed and non-depressed individuals: goals, strategies, and mechanisms
2018 (English)In: Music & Science, ISSN 20592043, Vol. 1, p. 1-12Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2018
Keywords
depression, emotion regulation, mechanisms, music listening, strategies
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-339558 (URN)
Available from: 2018-01-19 Created: 2018-01-19 Last updated: 2018-03-14Bibliographically approved
Juslin, P. N., Laukka, P. & Bänziger, T. (2018). The Mirror to Our Soul?: Comparisons of Spontaneous and Posed Vocal Expression of Emotion. Journal of nonverbal behavior, 42(1), 1-40
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Mirror to Our Soul?: Comparisons of Spontaneous and Posed Vocal Expression of Emotion
2018 (English)In: Journal of nonverbal behavior, ISSN 0191-5886, E-ISSN 1573-3653, Vol. 42, no 1, p. 1-40Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

It has been the subject of much debate in the study of vocal expression of emotions whether posed expressions (e.g., actor portrayals) are different from spontaneous expressions. In the present investigation, we assembled a new database consisting of 1877 voice clips from 23 datasets, and used it to systematically compare spontaneous and posed expressions across 3 experiments. Results showed that (a) spontaneous expressions were generally rated as more genuinely emotional than were posed expressions, even when controlling for differences in emotion intensity, (b) there were differences between the two stimulus types with regard to their acoustic characteristics, and (c) spontaneous expressions with a high emotion intensity conveyed discrete emotions to listeners to a similar degree as has previously been found for posed expressions, supporting a dose–response relationship between intensity of expression and discreteness in perceived emotions. Our conclusion is that there are reliable differences between spontaneous and posed expressions, though not necessarily in the ways commonly assumed. Implications for emotion theories and the use of emotion portrayals in studies of vocal expression are discussed.

National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-332440 (URN)10.1007/s10919-017-0268-x (DOI)000425296000001 ()29497220 (PubMedID)
Funder
Riksbankens Jubileumsfond, P12-0771:1
Available from: 2017-10-27 Created: 2017-10-27 Last updated: 2018-04-06Bibliographically approved
Juslin, P. N. & Lindström, E. (2016). Emotion in music performance. (2ed.). In: S. Hallam, I. Cross, & M. Thaut (Ed.), Oxford handbook of music psychology: (pp. 597-613). New York: Oxford University Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Emotion in music performance.
2016 (English)In: Oxford handbook of music psychology / [ed] S. Hallam, I. Cross, & M. Thaut, New York: Oxford University Press, 2016, 2, p. 597-613Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York: Oxford University Press, 2016 Edition: 2
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-269919 (URN)978-0-19-872294-6 (ISBN)
Available from: 2015-12-18 Created: 2015-12-18 Last updated: 2016-04-27
Juslin, P. N. (2016). Emotional reactions to music. (2ed.). In: S. Hallam, I. Cross, & M. Thaut (Ed.), Oxford handbook of music psychology: (pp. 197-213). New York: Oxford University Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Emotional reactions to music.
2016 (English)In: Oxford handbook of music psychology / [ed] S. Hallam, I. Cross, & M. Thaut, New York: Oxford University Press, 2016, 2, p. 197-213Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York: Oxford University Press, 2016 Edition: 2
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-269917 (URN)
Available from: 2015-12-18 Created: 2015-12-18 Last updated: 2016-04-27
Juslin, P. N., Sakka, L. S., Barradas, G. & Liljeström, S. (2016). No accounting for taste? Idiographic models of aesthetic judgment in music. Psychology of Aesthetics, Creativity, and the Arts, 10(2), 157-170
Open this publication in new window or tab >>No accounting for taste? Idiographic models of aesthetic judgment in music
2016 (English)In: Psychology of Aesthetics, Creativity, and the Arts, ISSN 1931-3896, E-ISSN 1931-390X, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 157-170Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Music is commonly regarded as one of the fine arts, but aesthetic responses to music are still poorly understood. In this study, we investigated aesthetic judgments of music by using the tools of judgment analysis. The aim was to shed some light on the psychological process through which listeners use a set of subjective and differentially weighted criteria to assign aesthetic value to pieces of music. We used a stratified random sampling procedure to select 72 pieces of music from 12 genres. The pieces were divided across 2 groups of participants (N = 44), who rated each piece with regard to 7 aesthetic criteria (e.g., beauty, originality, expressivity) and overall aesthetic value. Both individual ("idiographic") and averaged ("nomothetic") multiple regression analyses were conducted on the listeners' judgments. The results revealed that (a) linear models provided a good fit to the listeners' aesthetic judgments (mean variance accounted for 76%), suggesting that the process is systematic and mainly additive; (b) some criteria (e.g., originality, skill) made a larger contribution to prediction than others overall; (c) there were wide individual differences between listeners concerning which criteria they used; (d) a nomothetic regression model did not adequately reflect the distinct judgment policies of individual listeners; (e) the trait openness to experience was not correlated with judgments of aesthetic value; and (f) listeners who scored high on the Beck Depression Inventory generally provided higher ratings of aesthetic value (r = .40) than listeners who scored low.

Keywords
aesthetics; judgment; modeling; music; preference
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-269913 (URN)10.1037/aca0000034 (DOI)000379783500005 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 421-2010-2129
Available from: 2015-12-18 Created: 2015-12-18 Last updated: 2018-01-19Bibliographically approved
Juslin, P. N. (2015). Accounts of Emotional Reactions to Music: “The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly”. In: : . Paper presented at Invited keynote speech at Fourth International Conference on Music and Emotion, Geneva, Switzerland. October 2015..
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Accounts of Emotional Reactions to Music: “The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly”
2015 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other academic)
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-284538 (URN)
Conference
Invited keynote speech at Fourth International Conference on Music and Emotion, Geneva, Switzerland. October 2015.
Available from: 2016-04-18 Created: 2016-04-18 Last updated: 2016-04-27
Juslin, P. N. (2015). Därför väcker musik känslor. Psykologtidningen, 10(9), 26-29
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Därför väcker musik känslor
2015 (Swedish)In: Psykologtidningen, ISSN 0280-9702, Vol. 10, no 9, p. 26-29Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.)) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sveriges Psykologförbund, 2015
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-288364 (URN)
Available from: 2016-04-27 Created: 2016-04-27 Last updated: 2016-04-27
Juslin, P. N., Barradas, G. & Eerola, T. (2015). From sound to significance: Exploring the mechanisms underlying emotional reactions to music. American Journal of Psychology, 128(3), 281-304
Open this publication in new window or tab >>From sound to significance: Exploring the mechanisms underlying emotional reactions to music
2015 (English)In: American Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0002-9556, E-ISSN 1939-8298, Vol. 128, no 3, p. 281-304Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A common approach to studying emotional reactions to music is to attempt to obtain direct links between musical surface features such as tempo and a listener's responses. However, such an analysis ultimately fails to explain why emotions are aroused in the listener. In this article we explore an alternative approach, which aims to account for musical emotions in terms of a set of psychological mechanisms that are activated by different types of information in a musical event. This approach was tested in 4 experiments that manipulated 4 mechanisms (brain stem reflex, contagion, episodic memory, musical expectancy) by selecting existing musical pieces that featured information relevant for each mechanism. The excerpts were played to 60 listeners, who were asked to rate their felt emotions on 15 scales. Skin conductance levels and facial expressions were measured, and listeners reported subjective impressions of relevance to specific mechanisms. Results indicated that the target mechanism conditions evoked emotions largely as predicted by a multimechanism framework and that mostly similar effects occurred across the experiments that included different pieces of music. We conclude that a satisfactory account of musical emotions requires consideration of how musical features and responses are mediated by a range of underlying mechanisms.

National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-261219 (URN)000359014200001 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council
Available from: 2015-09-08 Created: 2015-08-31 Last updated: 2017-12-04
Juslin, P. N., Sakka, L. S., Barradas, G. & Liljeström, S. (2015). Idiographic modelling of aesthetic judgments of music. In: J. Ginsborg, A. Lamont, & S. Bramley (Ed.), Proceedings of the Ninth Triennial Conference of the European Society for the Cognitive Sciences of Music ESCOM, Manchester, 17-22 August, Manchester, UK.: . Paper presented at Ninth Triennial Conference of the European Society for the Cognitive Sciences of Music ESCOM, Manchester, UK. August 2015. (pp. 492-493). Manchester, UK: The European Society for the Cognitive Sciences of Music (ESCOM)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Idiographic modelling of aesthetic judgments of music
2015 (English)In: Proceedings of the Ninth Triennial Conference of the European Society for the Cognitive Sciences of Music ESCOM, Manchester, 17-22 August, Manchester, UK. / [ed] J. Ginsborg, A. Lamont, & S. Bramley, Manchester, UK: The European Society for the Cognitive Sciences of Music (ESCOM) , 2015, p. 492-493Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Manchester, UK: The European Society for the Cognitive Sciences of Music (ESCOM), 2015
Keywords
music, aesthetics, judgment, preference, theory, modeling
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-284537 (URN)
Conference
Ninth Triennial Conference of the European Society for the Cognitive Sciences of Music ESCOM, Manchester, UK. August 2015.
Available from: 2016-04-18 Created: 2016-04-18 Last updated: 2017-10-13
Juslin, P. N., Barradas, G. & Eerola, T. (2015). Manipulation of mechanisms underlying emotional reactions in music. In: J. Ginsborg, A. Lamont, & S. Bramley (Ed.), Proceedings of the Ninth Triennial Conference of the European Society for the Cognitive Sciences of Music, 17-22 August 2015, Manchester, UK: . Paper presented at Ninth Triennial Conference of the European Society for the Cognitive Sciences of Music (pp. 490-491). Manchester, UK: The European Society for the Cognitive Sciences of Music (ESCOM)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Manipulation of mechanisms underlying emotional reactions in music
2015 (English)In: Proceedings of the Ninth Triennial Conference of the European Society for the Cognitive Sciences of Music, 17-22 August 2015, Manchester, UK / [ed] J. Ginsborg, A. Lamont, & S. Bramley, Manchester, UK: The European Society for the Cognitive Sciences of Music (ESCOM) , 2015, p. 490-491Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Manchester, UK: The European Society for the Cognitive Sciences of Music (ESCOM), 2015
Keywords
music, emotion, listening, mechanism, psychophysiology
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-288416 (URN)
Conference
Ninth Triennial Conference of the European Society for the Cognitive Sciences of Music
Available from: 2016-04-27 Created: 2016-04-27 Last updated: 2016-04-27
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