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Lindberg, Eva
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Publications (10 of 91) Show all publications
Ekström, M., Sundh, J., Schiöler, L., Lindberg, E., Rosengren, A., Bergström, G., . . . Toren, K. (2018). Absolute lung size and the sex difference in breathlessness in the general population. PLoS ONE, 13(1), Article ID e0190876.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Absolute lung size and the sex difference in breathlessness in the general population
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2018 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 13, no 1, article id e0190876Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Breathlessness is associated with major adverse health outcomes and is twice as common in women as men in the general population. We evaluated whether this is related to their lower absolute lung volumes.

Methods: Cross-sectional analysis of the population-based Swedish CardioPulmonarybioImage Study (SCAPIS) Pilot, including static spirometry and diffusing capacity (n = 1,013; 49% women). Breathlessness was measured using the modified Medical Research Council (mMRC) scale and analyzed using ordinal logistic regression adjusting for age, pack-years of smoking, body mass index, chronic airway limitation, asthma, chronic bronchitis, depression and anxiety in all models.

Results: Breathlessness was twice as common in women as in men; adjusted odds ratio (OR) 2.20 (95% confidence interval, 1.32-3.66). Lower absolute lung volumes were associated with increased breathlessness prevalence in both men and women. The sex difference in breathlessness was unchanged when adjusting for lung function in %predicted, but disappeared when controlling for absolute values of total lung capacity (OR 1.12; 0.59-2.15), inspiratory capacity (OR 1.26; 0.68-2.35), forced vital capacity (OR 0.84; 0.42-1.66), forced expiratory volume in one second (OR 0.70; 0.36-1.35) or lung diffusing capacity (OR 1.07; 0.58-1.97).

Conclusion: In the general population, the markedly higher prevalence of breathlessness in women is related to their smaller absolute lung volumes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
PUBLIC LIBRARY SCIENCE, 2018
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-341579 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0190876 (DOI)000419403800132 ()29304074 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Heart Lung FoundationKnut and Alice Wallenberg FoundationSwedish Research CouncilVINNOVAForte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and WelfareSwedish Society of Medicine
Available from: 2018-02-12 Created: 2018-02-12 Last updated: 2018-02-12Bibliographically approved
Titova, O. E., Lindberg, E., Elmstahl, S., Lind, L., Schiöth, H. B. & Benedict, C. (2018). Associations Between the Prevalence of Metabolic Syndrome and Sleep Parameters Vary by Age. Frontiers in Endocrinology, 9, Article ID 234.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Associations Between the Prevalence of Metabolic Syndrome and Sleep Parameters Vary by Age
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2018 (English)In: Frontiers in Endocrinology, ISSN 1664-2392, E-ISSN 1664-2392, Vol. 9, article id 234Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: To examine whether the relationship between the metabolic syndrome (MetS) and various sleep parameters [sleep duration, symptoms of sleep-disordered breathing (SDB), and sleep disturbances] varies by age. Methods: Waist circumference, blood pressure, triglycerides, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and fasting glucose were used to determine MetS status in a cohort (N = 19,691) of middle-aged (aged 45-64 years) and older (aged >= 65 years) subjects. Habitual sleep duration (short, <= 6 h/day; normal, 7-8 h/day; and long >= 9 h/day), sleep disturbances (such as problems with falling and staying asleep), and symptoms of sleep-disordered breathing (SDB, such as snoring and sleep apneas) were measured by questionnaires. Results: Among the participants, 4,941 subjects (25.1%) fulfilled the criteria for MetS. In the entire sample, both short and long sleep durations were associated with higher prevalence of MetS as compared to normal sleep duration. When stratified by age, a similar pattern was observed for middle-aged subjects (<65 years old; prevalence ratio (PR) [95% CI], 1.13 [1.06-1.22] for short sleep and 1.26 [1.06-1.50] for long sleep duration). In contrast, in older individuals (>= 65 years old), only long sleep duration was linked to a higher prevalence of MetS (1.26 [1.12-1.42]; P < 0.01 for sleep duration x age). In the entire cohort, having at least one SDB symptom >= 4 times per week was linked to an increased prevalence of MetS; however, the PR was higher in middle-aged subjects compared with older subjects (1.50 [1.38-1.63] vs. 1.36 [1.26-1.47], respectively; P < 0.001 for SDB x age). Finally, independent of subjects' age, reports of sleep disturbances (i.e., at least one symptom >= 4 times per week) were associated with a higher likelihood of having MetS (1.12 [1.06-1.18]; P > 0.05 for sleep disturbance x age). Conclusion: Our results suggest that age may modify the associations between some sleep parameters and the prevalence of MetS.

Keywords
sleep duration, sleep disturbance, sleep-disordered breathing, metabolic syndrome, age
National Category
Respiratory Medicine and Allergy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-356873 (URN)10.3389/fendo.2018.00234 (DOI)000431867800001 ()29867766 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2015-03100The Swedish Brain FoundationNovo Nordisk, NNF14OC0009349
Available from: 2018-08-09 Created: 2018-08-09 Last updated: 2018-08-09Bibliographically approved
Mindus, S., Malinovschi, A., Ekerljung, L., Forsberg, B., Gislason, T., Jogi, R., . . . Janson, C. (2018). Asthma and COPD overlap (ACO) is related to a high burden of sleep disturbance and respiratory symptoms: Results from the RHINE and Swedish GA(2)LEN surveys. PLoS ONE, 13(4), Article ID e0195055.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Asthma and COPD overlap (ACO) is related to a high burden of sleep disturbance and respiratory symptoms: Results from the RHINE and Swedish GA(2)LEN surveys
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2018 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 13, no 4, article id e0195055Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: The term Asthma and COPD Overlap (ACO) describes a condition where asthma and COPD overlap. We aimed to investigate associations between ACO and insomnia and respiratory symptoms, and to investigate the prevalence of ACO and the characteristics of subjects with ACO in two Northern European population studies.

Methods: The study comprised 25 429 subjects aged >40 years who participated in one of two Northern European general population surveys. Both surveys included questions on asthma, COPD, respiratory and sleep-related symptoms, including difficulty initiating sleep, difficulty maintaining sleep, early-morning awakening, and excessive daytime sleepiness. ACO was defined as having both self-reported asthma and COPD.

Results: The prevalence of ACO was 1.0%. The group with ACO had a higher prevalence of both insomnia and respiratory symptoms than subjects with only asthma or COPD. Having ACO was independently associated with a 2-3 times higher probability of having sleep-related symptoms as compared with the group without asthma or COPD, after adjustment for age, sex, BMI, smoking history and educational level (adjusted odds ratio 2.14-3.36, 95% CI).

Conclusion: Subjects with ACO have a high prevalence of insomnia and respiratory symptoms. To our knowledge, this is the first study to assess the association between sleep-related symptoms and ACO.

National Category
Respiratory Medicine and Allergy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-351632 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0195055 (DOI)000428988800023 ()29608582 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Asthma and Allergy AssociationSwedish Heart Lung FoundationThe Swedish Heart and Lung AssociationForte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare
Available from: 2018-06-07 Created: 2018-06-07 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Cai, G.-H., Janson, C., Theorell-Haglöw, J., Benedict, C., Elmståhl, S., Lind, L. & Lindberg, E. (2018). Both Weight at Age 20 and Weight Gain Have an Impact on Sleep Disturbances Later in Life: Results of the EpiHealth Study. Sleep, 41(1), Article ID zsx176.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Both Weight at Age 20 and Weight Gain Have an Impact on Sleep Disturbances Later in Life: Results of the EpiHealth Study
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2018 (English)In: Sleep, ISSN 0161-8105, E-ISSN 1550-9109, Vol. 41, no 1, article id zsx176Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Study Objectives: Obesity is often associated with impaired sleep, whereas the impact of body mass index (BMI) at younger age and previous weight gain on sleep problems remains unknown.

Methods: The present study utilized data from the Swedish EpiHealth cohort study. A total of 15 845 participants (45-75 years) filled out an internet-based questionnaire. BMI was calculated from both measured data at study time and self-reported data at age 20 from the questionnaire.

Results: Sleep-related symptoms were most common among obese individuals (BMI >30 kg/m(2)). An association between weight gain and sleep problems was found and those with a low BMI at age 20 were most vulnerable to weight gain when it came to risk of sleep problems. Among those who were underweight (BMI <18.5 kg/m(2)) at age 20, weight gain (kg/year) was associated with difficulties initiating sleep with an adjusted OR of 2.64 (95% CI: 1.51-4.62) after adjusting for age, sex, smoking, alcohol consumption, physical activity, education, and civil status. The corresponding adjusted OR's among those who had been normal weight (BMI 18.5-24.99) and overweight (BMI 25-29.99 kg/m(2)) at age 20 were 1.89 (1.47-2.45) and 1.02 (0.48-2.13), respectively. Also difficulties maintaining sleep and snoring were most strongly related to weight gain among those who were underweight at age 20 with decreasing odds with increasing BMI at that age.

Conclusions: Sleep problems are related to weight gain and obesity. The impact of weight is most pronounced among those who had a low BMI when young.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
OXFORD UNIV PRESS INC, 2018
Keywords
epidemiology, insomnia, obesity, aging, weight gain, EpiHealth study, body mass index (BMI), Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS), sleep problems, snoring
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-342460 (URN)10.1093/sleep/zsx176 (DOI)000422879100012 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council
Available from: 2018-02-26 Created: 2018-02-26 Last updated: 2018-02-26Bibliographically approved
Christensson, E., Franklin, K. A., Sahlin, C., Palm, A., Ulfberg, J., Eriksson, L. I., . . . Jonsson Fagerlund, M. (2018). Can STOP-Bang and Pulse Oximetry Detect and Exclude Obstructive Sleep Apnea?. Anesthesia and Analgesia, 127(3), 736-743
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Can STOP-Bang and Pulse Oximetry Detect and Exclude Obstructive Sleep Apnea?
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2018 (English)In: Anesthesia and Analgesia, ISSN 0003-2999, E-ISSN 1526-7598, Vol. 127, no 3, p. 736-743Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is related to postoperative complications and is a common disorder. Most patients with sleep apnea are, however, undiagnosed, and there is a need for simple screening tools. We aimed to investigate whether STOP-Bang and oxygen desaturation index can identify subjects with OSA.

METHODS: In this prospective, observational multicenter trial, 449 adult patients referred to a sleep clinic for evaluation of OSA were investigated with ambulatory polygraphy, including pulse oximetry and the STOP-Bang questionnaire in 4 Swedish centers. The STOP-Bang score is the sum of 8 positive answers to Snoring, Tiredness, Observed apnea, high blood Pressure, Body mass index >35 kg/m, Age >50 years, Neck circumference >40 cm, and male Gender.

RESULTS: The optimal STOP-Bang cutoff score was 6 for moderate and severe sleep apnea, defined as apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) ≥15, and the sensitivity and specificity for this score were 63% (95% CI, 0.55-0.70) and 69% (95% CI, 0.64-0.75), respectively. A STOP-Bang score of <2 had a probability of 95% (95% CI, 0.92-0.98) to exclude an AHI >15 and a STOP-Bang score of ≥6 had a specificity of 91% (95% CI, 0.87-0.94) for an AHI >15. The items contributing most to the STOP-Bang were the Bang items. There was a positive correlation between AHI versus STOP-Bang and between AHI versus oxygen desaturation index, Spearman ρ 0.50 (95% CI, 0.43-0.58) and 0.96 (95% CI, 0.94-0.97), respectively.

CONCLUSIONS: STOP-Bang and pulse oximetry can be used to screen for sleep apnea. A STOP-Bang score of <2 almost excludes moderate and severe OSA, whereas nearly all the patients with a STOP-Bang score ≥6 have OSA. We suggest the addition of nightly pulse oximetry in patients with a STOP-Bang score of 2-5 when there is a need for screening for sleep apnea (ie, before surgery).

National Category
Anesthesiology and Intensive Care
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-361338 (URN)10.1213/ANE.0000000000003607 (DOI)29958223 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-09-23 Created: 2018-09-23 Last updated: 2018-11-08Bibliographically approved
Janson, C., Johannessen, A., Franklin, K., Svanes, C., Schioler, L., Malinovschi, A., . . . Lindberg, E. (2018). Change in the prevalence asthma, rhinitis and respiratory symptom over a 20 year period: associations to year of birth, life style and sleep related symptoms. BMC Pulmonary Medicine, 18, Article ID 152.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Change in the prevalence asthma, rhinitis and respiratory symptom over a 20 year period: associations to year of birth, life style and sleep related symptoms
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2018 (English)In: BMC Pulmonary Medicine, ISSN 1471-2466, E-ISSN 1471-2466, Vol. 18, article id 152Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: The aim of this investigation was to study change in adults over a 20 year period in the prevalence of respiratory symptoms and disorders and its association to year of birth, life style and sleep related variables.

Method: Adults 20-44 years of age, 6085 women and 5184 men, were randomly selected from seven centres in Northern Europe and followed for 20 years. The number of participants in the first survey was 21,595 and 11,269 participated in all three surveys. The participants were divided into three birth cohorts: 1944-1955, 1956-1965 and 1966-1975.

Results: During the 20 year period the prevalence of wheeze decreased (-2%) and the prevalence of asthma (+ 4%) and allergic rhinitis (+ 5%) increased, whereas the prevalence of nocturnal respiratory symptoms was relatively unchanged. The increase in allergic rhinitis was largest in those born 1966 to 1975 except in Estonia. There was large decrease in smoking (-20%), increase in obesity (+ 7%) and snoring (+ 6%) during the study period. Smoking, obesity, snoring and nocturnal gastroesophageal reflux (nGER) were related to a higher risk of all symptoms. Obesity, snoring and nGER were also independently related to asthma.

Conclusion: We conclude that as our participants got older there was a decrease in wheeze, no change in nocturnal symptoms and an increase in reported asthma and allergic rhinitis. These changes in prevalence are probably related to a decrease in smoking being counteracted by an increase in allergy, obesity and sleep related disorders.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BMC, 2018
Keywords
Asthma, Allergic rhinitis, Obesity, Smoking, Gastroesophageal reflux
National Category
Respiratory Medicine and Allergy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-365293 (URN)10.1186/s12890-018-0690-9 (DOI)000444491600001 ()30208969 (PubMedID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and WelfareSwedish Heart Lung FoundationSwedish Asthma and Allergy AssociationThe Research Council of Norway, 135773/330
Available from: 2018-11-14 Created: 2018-11-14 Last updated: 2018-11-14Bibliographically approved
Sundbom, F., Janson, C., Malinovschi, A. & Lindberg, E. (2018). Effects of Coexisting Asthma and Obstructive Sleep Apnea on Sleep Architecture, Oxygen Saturation, and Systemic Inflammation in Women. Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine (JCSM), 14(2), 253-259
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of Coexisting Asthma and Obstructive Sleep Apnea on Sleep Architecture, Oxygen Saturation, and Systemic Inflammation in Women
2018 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine (JCSM), ISSN 1550-9389, E-ISSN 1550-9397, Vol. 14, no 2, p. 253-259Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

STUDY OBJECTIVES: Both asthma and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) are strongly associated with poor sleep. Asthma and OSA also have several features in common, including airway obstruction, systemic inflammation, and an association with obesity. The aim was to analyze the effect of asthma, OSA, and the combination of asthma and OSA on objectively measured sleep quality and systemic inflammation.

METHODS: Sleep and health in women is an ongoing community-based study in Uppsala, Sweden. Three hundred eighty-four women ages 20 to 70 years underwent overnight polysomnography and completed questionnaires on airway diseases and sleep complaints. C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin 6 (IL-6), and tumor necrosis factor α were analyzed.

RESULTS: = .04) than the group with OSA alone. The results were consistent after adjusting for age, body mass index, and smoking status. Asthma was independently associated with lower oxygen saturation, whereas OSA was not.

CONCLUSIONS: Our data indicate that coexisting asthma and OSA are associated with poorer sleep quality and more profound nocturnal hypoxemia than either of the conditions alone. The results are similar to earlier findings related to OSA and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, but they have not previously been described for asthma.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Academy of Sleep Medicine, 2018
Keywords
OSA, asthma, inflammation, polysomnography
National Category
Respiratory Medicine and Allergy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-343517 (URN)10.5664/jcsm.6946 (DOI)000425136900013 ()29394961 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-02-27 Created: 2018-02-27 Last updated: 2018-04-11Bibliographically approved
Andersson Kallin, S., Lindberg, E., Sommar, J. N., Bossios, A., Ekerljung, L., Malinovschi, A., . . . Janson, C. (2018). Excessive daytime sleepiness in asthma: what are the risk factors?. Journal of Asthma, 55(8), 844-850
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Excessive daytime sleepiness in asthma: what are the risk factors?
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2018 (English)In: Journal of Asthma, ISSN 0277-0903, E-ISSN 1532-4303, Vol. 55, no 8, p. 844-850Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: Previous studies have found that excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) is a more common problem in asthmatic subjects than in the general population. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the prevalence of EDS is increased in asthmatic subjects and, if so, to analyse the occurrence of potential risk factors for EDS in asthmatics.

Methods: Cross-sectional epidemiological study. In 2008, a postal questionnaire was sent out to a random sample of 45,000 individuals aged 16–75 years in four Swedish cities.

Results: Of the 25,160 persons who participated, 7.3% were defined as having asthma. The prevalence of EDS was significantly higher in asthmatic subjects (42.1% vs. 28.5%, p < 0.001) compared with non-asthmatic subjects. Asthma was an independent risk factor for EDS (adjusted OR 1.29) and the risk of having EDS increased with asthma severity. Risk factors for EDS in subjects with asthma included insomnia (OR, 3.87; 95% CI, 3.10–4.84); chronic rhinosinusitis (OR, 2.00; 95% CI, 1.53–2.62); current smoking (OR, 1.60; 95% CI, 1.15–2.22) and obesity (OR, 1.53; 95% CI, 1.09–2.13).

Conclusions: EDS is a common problem among subjects with asthma. Asthma is an independent risk factor for having EDS. Furthermore, subjects with asthma often have other risk factors for EDS, many of them potentially modifiable.

National Category
Respiratory Medicine and Allergy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-311307 (URN)10.1080/02770903.2016.1263316 (DOI)000446112800004 ()27880055 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Asthma and Allergy Association, 2008021Swedish Heart Lung Foundation, HLF20070500
Available from: 2016-12-22 Created: 2016-12-22 Last updated: 2018-12-10Bibliographically approved
Palm, A., Midgren, B., Theorell-Haglöw, J., Ekström, M., Ljunggren, M., Janson, C. & Lindberg, E. (2018). Factors influencing adherence to continuous positive airway pressure treatment in obstructive sleep apnea and mortality associated with treatment failure -: a national registry-based cohort study.. Sleep Medicine, 51, 85-91, Article ID S1389-9457(18)30401-5.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Factors influencing adherence to continuous positive airway pressure treatment in obstructive sleep apnea and mortality associated with treatment failure -: a national registry-based cohort study.
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2018 (English)In: Sleep Medicine, ISSN 1389-9457, E-ISSN 1878-5506, Vol. 51, p. 85-91, article id S1389-9457(18)30401-5Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVES: Adherence to continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is crucial. Our aim was to identify protective and risk factors against the discontinuation of CPAP treatment in patients with OSA and to estimate the mortality risk in those who were non-adherent to CPAP therapy.

METHODS: This was a registry-based cohort study from 37 centers across Sweden with OSA patients on CPAP in the Swedevox Swedish national registry between July 2010 and March 2017.

RESULTS: In 16,425 patients (70.8% men) with complete follow-up data after 1.2 ± 0.8 years the adjusted relative risk ratio (aRRR) for the discontinuation of CPAP was 0.57 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.50-0.65) for use of humidifier, 0.87 (95% CI 0.82-0.92) for increasing age per 10 years, 0.80 (95% CI 0.77-0.83) for increasing apnea hypopnea index (AHI) per 5 units/hour, and 0.96 (95% CI 0.95-0.97) per increased unit on the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS). Increasing BMI was associated with increased adherence up to BMI 35. Women and patients with hypertension ran an increased risk of discontinuing CPAP treatment, aRRR 1.28 (95% CI 1.12-1.46) and 1.24 (95% CI 1.12-1.42) respectively. The adjusted hazard ratio (HR) for mortality was 1.74 (95% CI 1.32-2.28) among those who did not adhere to CPAP (median follow-up period 2.4 years after the one year adherence evaluation).

CONCLUSION: Use of humidifier is associated with greater adherence to CPAP treatment. Other factors predicting adherence are increasing age, more severe OSA and overweight up to BMI 35, whereas female gender and coexisting hypertension are risk factors for discontinuation of CPAP. Failure to adhere to CPAP is associated with increased mortality.

Keywords
Adherence, BMI, Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP), Gender, Humidifier, Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA)
National Category
Respiratory Medicine and Allergy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-361337 (URN)10.1016/j.sleep.2018.07.007 (DOI)30103074 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-09-23 Created: 2018-09-23 Last updated: 2018-11-23Bibliographically approved
Igelström, H., Åsenlöf, P., Emtner, M. & Lindberg, E. (2018). Improvement in obstructive sleep apnea after a tailored behavioural sleep medicine intervention targeting healthy eating and physical activity: a randomised controlled trial. Sleep and Breathing, 22(3), 653-661
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Improvement in obstructive sleep apnea after a tailored behavioural sleep medicine intervention targeting healthy eating and physical activity: a randomised controlled trial
2018 (English)In: Sleep and Breathing, ISSN 1520-9512, E-ISSN 1522-1709, Vol. 22, no 3, p. 653-661Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

PURPOSE: The aim of the present single-centre randomised controlled trial was to assess the effect of a behavioural sleep medicine (BSM) intervention on obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) severity in patients who have been referred for new treatment with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP).

METHODS: After baseline assessment including ventilatory and anthropometric parameters, and physical activity monitoring, 86 patients who were overweight (BMI ≥ 25) and had moderate-severe OSA with apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) ≥ 15 were randomised into a control group (CG; CPAP and advice about weight loss) or an experimental group (ExpG; CPAP and BSM intervention targeting physical activity and eating behaviour). The BSM intervention comprised 10 individual sessions with a dietician and a physiotherapist and included behaviour change techniques such as goal setting and self-monitoring. After 6 months, a new recording of ventilatory parameters was performed without CPAP.

RESULTS: In ExpG, 40% (n = 14) had improved from severe to moderate or mild OSA or from moderate to mild OSA compared to 16.7% in CG (n = 6, p = 0.02). Further, a lower AHI and amount body fat at baseline were correlated with improvement in severity class. Being in ExpG implied a mean improvement in AHI by 9.7 and an odds ratio of 4.5 for improving in severity classification.

CONCLUSIONS: The results highlight the clinical importance of lifestyle modifications in conjunction with CPAP treatment in patients with OSA.

Keywords
Behaviour modification, Diet, Obstructive sleep apnea, Physical activity
National Category
Respiratory Medicine and Allergy Physiotherapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-339680 (URN)10.1007/s11325-017-1597-z (DOI)000443212100009 ()29222619 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research CouncilSwedish Heart Lung Foundation
Available from: 2018-01-22 Created: 2018-01-22 Last updated: 2018-11-08Bibliographically approved
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