uu.seUppsala University Publications
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Botling, Johan
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 91) Show all publications
Tsakonas, G., Botling, J., Micke, P., Rivard, C., La Fleur, L., Mattsson, J., . . . Ekman, S. (2019). c-MET as a biomarker in patients with surgically resected non-small cell lung cancer. Lung Cancer, 133, 69-74
Open this publication in new window or tab >>c-MET as a biomarker in patients with surgically resected non-small cell lung cancer
Show others...
2019 (English)In: Lung Cancer, ISSN 0169-5002, E-ISSN 1872-8332, Vol. 133, p. 69-74Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: c-MET protein overexpression has been proposed as a biomarker in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), albeit its role in the clinical setting has not been firmly established yet. Patients and methods: We designed a retrospective cohort study, consisting of 725 patients with surgically removed NSCLC. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) was conducted in tissue microarrays (TMA) from lung tumors and healthy tissue. IHC staining was quantified using H-scores (range 0-300). Association between c-MET H-score and overall survival (OS) as well as progression-free survival (PFS) was explored. Results: c-MET H-score >= 20 had a significant positive impact on OS in the multivariate analysis in the whole study population, HR = 0.79 (95%CI: 0.64 - 0.97). The prognostic effect of c-MET H-score >= 20 was even stronger in patients who received adjuvant treatment with a HR = 0.61 (95% CI: 0.40 - 0.93). In the subgroup of adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma patients with stage IIA-IIIB disease, the prognostic impact of c-MET was significant in the univariate analysis (HR = 0.60, 95% CI: 0.43 - 0.83). Conclusion: c-MET H-score >= 20 is a positive prognostic biomarker for OS in early stage NSCLC. This benefit seems to be strongly correlated to adjuvant chemotherapy, therefore rendering c-MET H-score >= 20 a possible predictive biomarker for platinum-based adjuvant chemotherapy in early stage NSCLC.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
c-MET, Lung cancer, Biomarker, OS, PFS, H-score
National Category
Cancer and Oncology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-390909 (URN)10.1016/j.lungcan.2019.04.028 (DOI)000474326700012 ()31200831 (PubMedID)
Funder
Stockholm County Council
Available from: 2019-08-16 Created: 2019-08-16 Last updated: 2019-08-16Bibliographically approved
Vidarsdottir, H., Tran, L., Nodin, B., Jirström, K., Planck, M., Jönsson, P., . . . Brunnström, H. (2019). Immunohistochemical profiles in primary lung cancers and epithelial pulmonary metastases. Human Pathology, 84, 221-230
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Immunohistochemical profiles in primary lung cancers and epithelial pulmonary metastases
Show others...
2019 (English)In: Human Pathology, ISSN 0046-8177, E-ISSN 1532-8392, Vol. 84, p. 221-230Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Correct diagnosis of pulmonary tumors is essential for treatment decision and often rely on immunohistochemical markers. We stained tissue microarrays from resected primary lung cancer (n=665) and pulmonary metastases (n=425) for CK7, CK20, CDX2, CK5, p40, p63, TTF-1, napsin A, GATA3 and PAX8 to systematically assess the diagnostic value of these markers. Primary lung adenocarcinomas expressed TTF-1 in 90% and napsin A in 84% of the cases, while 10% were positive for p63, 7% for CDX2, 2% for CK20 and 2% for GATA3. Only 68% of the lung adenocarcinomas were positive for CK7, TTF-1 and napsin A and negative for all other markers. Primary lung squamous cell carcinomas expressed CK5, p40 and p63 in 94-97% of cases, while 44% were positive for CK7, 20% for GATA3, 7% for CDX2 and 3% for TTF-1. Rare cases expressed PAX8, CK20 or napsin A. Pulmonary metastases of colorectal cancer were positive for CK20 in 83% and CDX2 in 99% of the cases. Rare cases expressed CK7, p63 or PAX8, while 4% expressed TTF-1. Pulmonary metastases of renal cell carcinomas were positive for PAX8 in 74%, napsin A in 7% and CK7 in 7% of the cases. Pulmonary metastases of breast cancer were positive for GATA3 in 93% and CK7 in 78% of the cases, while 15% expressed CK5. Information on expression and patterns of immunohistochemical markers facilitates histopathological diagnostics. Evidently, unusual immune profiles occur and may lead to incorrect diagnosis.

Keywords
CDX2, Cytokeratin, GATA3, Napsin a, TTF-1, Tissue Microarray
National Category
Clinical Laboratory Medicine
Research subject
Pathology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-372013 (URN)10.1016/j.humpath.2018.10.009 (DOI)000461725100025 ()30389437 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-01-04 Created: 2019-01-04 Last updated: 2019-04-10Bibliographically approved
Micke, P., Botling, J., Mattsson, J. S., Planck, M., Tran, L., Vidarsdottir, H., . . . Brunnstrom, H. (2019). Mucin staining is of limited value in addition to basic immunohistochemical analyses in the diagnostics of non-small cell lung cancer. Scientific Reports, 9, Article ID 1319.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mucin staining is of limited value in addition to basic immunohistochemical analyses in the diagnostics of non-small cell lung cancer
Show others...
2019 (English)In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 9, article id 1319Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Accurate diagnosis of histological type is important for therapy selection in lung cancer. Immunohistochemical (IHC) and histochemical stains are often used to complement morphology for definite diagnosis and are incorporated in the WHO classification. Our main aim was to compare different mucin stains and assess their value in relation to common IHC analyses in lung cancer diagnostics. Using tissue microarrays from 657 surgically treated primary lung cancers, we evaluated the mucin stains periodic acid-Schiff with diastase (PASD), alcian blue-periodic acid-Schiff (ABPAS) and mucicarmine, and compared with the IHC markers p40, p63, cytokeratin 5, thyroid transcription factor 1 (TTF-1), napsin A and cytokeratin 7. Ten or more cytoplasmic mucin inclusions in a tissue microarray core were seen in 51%, 48% and 31% of the 416 adenocarcinomas and 3%, 4% and 0.5% of the 194 squamous cell carcinomas with PASD, ABPAS and mucicarmine, respectively. Diagnostic pitfalls, such as entrapped benign epithelium, apoptotic/necrotic cells and glycogen, partly differed for the mucin stains. TTF-1 and napsin A IHC stainings had similar specificity but better sensitivity for adenocarcinoma than the mucin stains, but addition of PASD or ABPAS identified more tumors as adenocarcinomas (n = 8 and n = 10, respectively) than napsin A (n = 1) in cases with solid growth that were negative for TTF-1 and p40. We conclude that PASD and ABPAS have similar diagnostic performance and that these markers are of value in poorly differentiated cases. However, morphology and TTF-1 and p40 IHC staining is sufficient for correct diagnosis in most non-small cell lung cancers.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
NATURE PUBLISHING GROUP, 2019
National Category
Cancer and Oncology Cell and Molecular Biology Clinical Laboratory Medicine
Research subject
Pathology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-377598 (URN)10.1038/s41598-018-37722-0 (DOI)000457616300207 ()30718697 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-02-26 Created: 2019-02-26 Last updated: 2019-03-29Bibliographically approved
La Fleur, L., Falk-Sörqvist, E., Smeds, P., Berglund, A., Sundström, M., Mattsson, J. S., . . . Botling, J. (2019). Mutation patterns in a population-based non-small cell lung cancer cohort and prognostic impact of concomitant mutations in KRAS and TP53 or STK11. Lung Cancer, 130, 50-58
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mutation patterns in a population-based non-small cell lung cancer cohort and prognostic impact of concomitant mutations in KRAS and TP53 or STK11
Show others...
2019 (English)In: Lung Cancer, ISSN 0169-5002, E-ISSN 1872-8332, Vol. 130, p. 50-58Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVES: Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is a heterogeneous disease with unique combinations of somatic molecular alterations in individual patients, as well as significant differences in populations across the world with regard to mutation spectra and mutation frequencies. Here we aim to describe mutational patterns and linked clinical parameters in a population-based NSCLC cohort.

MATERIALS AND METHODS: Using targeted resequencing the mutational status of 82 genes was evaluated in a consecutive Swedish surgical NSCLC cohort, consisting of 352 patient samples from either fresh frozen or formalin fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) tissues. The panel covers all exons of the 82 genes and utilizes reduced target fragment length and two-strand capture making it compatible with degraded FFPE samples.

RESULTS: We obtained a uniform sequencing coverage and mutation load across the fresh frozen and FFPE samples by adaption of sequencing depth and bioinformatic pipeline, thereby avoiding a technical bias between these two sample types. At large, the mutation frequencies resembled the frequencies seen in other western populations, except for a high frequency of KRAS hotspot mutations (43%) in adenocarcinoma patients. Worse overall survival was observed for adenocarcinoma patients with a mutation in either TP53, STK11 or SMARCA4. In the adenocarcinoma KRAS-mutated group poor survival appeared to be linked to concomitant TP53 or STK11 mutations, and not to KRAS mutation as a single aberration. Similar results were seen in the analysis of publicly available data from the cBioPortal. In squamous cell carcinoma a worse prognosis could be observed for patients with MLL2 mutations, while CSMD3 mutations were linked to a better prognosis.

CONCLUSION: Here we have evaluated the mutational status of a NSCLC cohort. We could not confirm any survival impact of isolated driver mutations. Instead, concurrent mutations in TP53 and STK11 were shown to confer poor survival in the KRAS-positive adenocarcinoma subgroup.

Keywords
KRAS, Mutation patterns, Non-small cell lung cancer, STK11, TP53, Targeted resequencing
National Category
Clinical Laboratory Medicine
Research subject
Pathology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-380587 (URN)10.1016/j.lungcan.2019.01.003 (DOI)000463276900008 ()30885352 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Cancer Society, 2013/711Swedish Cancer Society, 2016/827
Available from: 2019-03-29 Created: 2019-03-29 Last updated: 2019-08-20Bibliographically approved
Salomonsson, A., Patthey, A., Reutersward, C., Jonsson, M., Botling, J., Brunnstrom, H., . . . Planck, M. (2018). A Nation-Wide Population-Based Mapping of Targetable Alterations in Smoking-Independent Lung Cancer. Paper presented at IASLC 19th World Conference on Lung Cancer. Journal of Thoracic Oncology, 13(10), S431-S432
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Nation-Wide Population-Based Mapping of Targetable Alterations in Smoking-Independent Lung Cancer
Show others...
2018 (English)In: Journal of Thoracic Oncology, ISSN 1556-0864, E-ISSN 1556-1380, Vol. 13, no 10, p. S431-S432Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
Keywords
population-based, never-smoker, gene fusion
National Category
Cancer and Oncology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-373922 (URN)10.1016/j.jtho.2018.08.497 (DOI)000454014501133 ()
Conference
IASLC 19th World Conference on Lung Cancer
Available from: 2019-01-17 Created: 2019-01-17 Last updated: 2019-01-17Bibliographically approved
Vidarsdottir, H., Tran, L., Nodin, B., Jirström, K., Planck, M., Mattsson, J. S., . . . Brunnström, H. (2018). Comparison of Three Different TTF-1 Clones in Resected Primary Lung Cancer and Epithelial Pulmonary Metastase. American Journal of Clinical Pathology, 150(6), 533-544
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Comparison of Three Different TTF-1 Clones in Resected Primary Lung Cancer and Epithelial Pulmonary Metastase
Show others...
2018 (English)In: American Journal of Clinical Pathology, ISSN 0002-9173, E-ISSN 1943-7722, Vol. 150, no 6, p. 533-544Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives: Immunohistochemical staining against thyroid transcription factor 1 (TTF-1) is often used to distinguish lung adenocarcinoma from squamous cell carcinoma and pulmonary metastasis.

Methods: TTF-1 expression was examined using the antibody clones 8G7G3/1, SPT24, and SP141 on tissue microarrays from 665 cases of resected lung cancers and 428 pulmonary metastases.

Results: Most lung adenocarcinomas, 89%, 93%, and 93%, were positive with TTF-1 clones 8G7G3/1, SPT24, and SP141, respectively. The corresponding figures for lung squamous cell carcinomas were 0%, 6%, and 8%. In total, five (2%), 19 (7%), and 21 (8%) of the pulmonary metastases from colorectal adenocarcinomas were positive with clones 8G7G3/1, SPT24, and SP141, respectively. Other TTF-1-positive pulmonary metastases (n = 8) were thyroid, urothelial, pancreatic, small bowel, and cervix carcinomas.

Conclusions: TTF-1 expression in lung cancer and pulmonary metastases differs between clones, with 8G7G3/1 being more specific but less sensitive compared with SPT24 and SP141.

National Category
Clinical Laboratory Medicine
Research subject
Pathology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-372014 (URN)10.1093/ajcp/aqy083 (DOI)000456564300008 ()30169783 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-01-04 Created: 2019-01-04 Last updated: 2019-03-29Bibliographically approved
La Fleur, L., Boura, V. F., Alexeyenko, A., Berglund, A., Ponten, V., Mattsson, J. S., . . . Botling, J. (2018). Expression of scavenger receptor MARCO defines a targetable tumor-associated macrophage subset in non-small cell lung cancer. International Journal of Cancer, 143(7), 1741-1752
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Expression of scavenger receptor MARCO defines a targetable tumor-associated macrophage subset in non-small cell lung cancer
Show others...
2018 (English)In: International Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0020-7136, E-ISSN 1097-0215, Vol. 143, no 7, p. 1741-1752Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) are attractive targets for immunotherapy. Recently, studies in animal models showed that treatment with an anti-TAM antibody directed against the scavenger receptor MARCO resulted in suppression of tumor growth and metastatic dissemination. Here we investigated the expression of MARCO in relation to other macrophage markers and immune pathways in a non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cohort (n=352). MARCO, CD68, CD163, MSR1 and programmed death ligand-1 (PD-L1) were analyzed by immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence, and associations to other immune cells and regulatory pathways were studied in a subset of cases (n=199) with available RNA-seq data. We observed a large variation in macrophage density between cases and a strong correlation between CD68 and CD163, suggesting that the majority of TAMs present in NSCLC exhibit a protumor phenotype. Correlation to clinical data only showed a weak trend toward worse survival for patients with high macrophage infiltration. Interestingly, MARCO was expressed on a distinct subpopulation of TAMs, which tended to aggregate in close proximity to tumor cell nests. On the transcriptomic level, we found a positive association between MARCO gene expression and general immune response pathways including strong links to immunosuppressive TAMs, T-cell infiltration and immune checkpoint molecules. Indeed, a higher macrophage infiltration was seen in tumors expressing PD-L1, and macrophages residing within tumor cell nests co-expressed MARCO and PD-L1. Thus, MARCO is a potential new immune target for anti-TAM treatment in a subset of NSCLC patients, possibly in combination with available immune checkpoint inhibitors.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
WILEY, 2018
Keywords
lung cancer, MARCO, tumor-associated macrophages, immune therapy, PD-L1
National Category
Cancer and Oncology Clinical Laboratory Medicine
Research subject
Pathology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-364230 (URN)10.1002/ijc.31545 (DOI)000443392100020 ()29667169 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Cancer Society
Available from: 2018-10-24 Created: 2018-10-24 Last updated: 2019-08-20Bibliographically approved
Nicholson, A. G., Torkko, K., Viola, P., Duhig, E., Geisinger, K., Borczuk, A. C., . . . Franklin, W. A. (2018). Interobserver Variation among Pathologists and Refinement of Criteria in Distinguishing Separate Primary Tumors from Intrapulmonary Metastases in Lung. Journal of Thoracic Oncology, 13(2), 205-217
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Interobserver Variation among Pathologists and Refinement of Criteria in Distinguishing Separate Primary Tumors from Intrapulmonary Metastases in Lung
Show others...
2018 (English)In: Journal of Thoracic Oncology, ISSN 1556-0864, E-ISSN 1556-1380, Vol. 13, no 2, p. 205-217Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Multiple tumor nodules are seen with increasing frequency in clinical practice. On the basis of the 2015 WHO classification of lung tumors, we assessed the reproducibility of the comprehensive histologic assessment to distinguish second primary lung cancers (SPLCs) from intrapulmonary metastases (IPMs), looking for the most distinctive histologic features. An international panel of lung pathologists reviewed a scanned sequential cohort of 126 tumors from 48 patients and recorded an agreed set of histologic features, including tumor typing and predominant pattern of adenocarcinoma, thereby opining whether the case was SPLC, IPM, or a combination thereof. Cohen kappa statistics of 0.60 on overall assessment of SPLC or IPM indicated a good agreement. Likewise, there was good agreement (kappa score 0.64, p < 0.0001) between WHO histologic pattern in individual cases and SPLC or IPM status, but the proportions diversified for histologic pattern and SPLC or IPM status (McNemar test, p < 0.0001). The strongest associations for distinguishing between SPLC and IPM were observed for nuclear pleomorphism, cell size, acinus formation, nucleolar size, mitotic rate, nuclear inclusions, intraalveolar clusters, and necrosis. Conversely, the associations for lymphocytosis, mucin content, lepidic growth, vascular invasion, macrophage response, clear cell change, acute inflammation keratinization, and emperipolesis did not reach significance with tumor extent. Comprehensive histologic assessment is recommended for distinguishing SPLC from IPM with good reproducibility among lung pathologists. In addition to main histologic type and predominant patterns of histologic subtypes, nuclear pleomorphism, cell size, acinus formation, nucleolar size, and mitotic rate strongly correlate with pathologic staging status.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ELSEVIER SCIENCE INC, 2018
Keywords
Lung cancer, Pathology, Multiple tumors, Interobserver variation
National Category
Cancer and Oncology Clinical Laboratory Medicine
Research subject
Pathology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-349848 (URN)10.1016/j.jtho.2017.10.019 (DOI)000424963400007 ()29127023 (PubMedID)
Funder
AstraZeneca
Available from: 2018-05-03 Created: 2018-05-03 Last updated: 2019-03-29Bibliographically approved
Karlsson, T., Kvarnbrink, S., Holmlund, C., Botling, J., Micke, P., Henriksson, R., . . . Hedman, H. (2018). LMO7 and LIMCH1 interact with LRIG proteins in lung cancer, with prognostic implications for early-stage disease. Lung Cancer, 125, 174-184
Open this publication in new window or tab >>LMO7 and LIMCH1 interact with LRIG proteins in lung cancer, with prognostic implications for early-stage disease
Show others...
2018 (English)In: Lung Cancer, ISSN 0169-5002, E-ISSN 1872-8332, Vol. 125, p. 174-184Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives: The human leucine-rich repeats and immunoglobulin-like domains (LRIG) protein family comprises the integral membrane proteins LRIG1, LRIG2 and LRIG3. LRIG1 is frequently down-regulated in human cancer, and high levels of LRIG1 in tumor tissue are associated with favorable clinical outcomes in several tumor types including non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Mechanistically, LRIG1 negatively regulates receptor tyrosine kinases and functions as a tumor suppressor. However, the details of the molecular mechanisms involved are poorly understood, and even less is known about the functions of LRIG2 and LRIG3. The aim of this study was to further elucidate the functions and molecular interactions of the LRIG proteins.

Materials and methods: A yeast two-hybrid screen was performed using a cytosolic LRIG3 peptide as bait. In transfected human cells, co-immunoprecipitation and co-localization experiments were performed. Proximity ligation assay was performed to investigate interactions between endogenously expressed proteins. Expression levels of LMO7 and LIMCH1 in normal and malignant lung tissue were investigated using qRT-PCR and through in silico analyses of public data sets. Finally, a clinical cohort comprising 355 surgically treated NSCLC cases was immunostained for LMO7.

Results: In the yeast two-hybrid screen, the two paralogous proteins LMO7 and LIMCH1 were identified as interaction partners to LRIG3. LMO7 and LIMCH1 co-localized and co-immunoprecipitated with both LRIG1 and LRIG3. Endogenously expressed LMO7 was in close proximity of both LRIG1 and LRIG3. LMO7 and LIMCH1 were highly expressed in normal lung tissue and down-regulated in malignant lung tissue. LMO7 immunoreactivity was shown to be a negative prognostic factor in LRIG1 positive tumors, predicting poor patient survival.

Conclusion: These findings suggest that LMO7 and LIMCH1 physically interact with LRIG proteins and that expression of LMO7 is of clinical importance in NSCLC.

Keywords
Non-small cell lung cancer, Lung cancer, Prognosis, LRIG1, LRIG3, LMO7, LIMCH1
National Category
Cancer and Oncology Clinical Laboratory Medicine
Research subject
Pathology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-371554 (URN)10.1016/j.lungcan.2018.09.017 (DOI)000450378500025 ()30429017 (PubMedID)
Funder
The Kempe FoundationsSwedish Cancer Society
Available from: 2018-12-21 Created: 2018-12-21 Last updated: 2019-03-29Bibliographically approved
Tsao, M. S., Kerr, K. M., Kockx, M., Beasley, M.-B., Borczuk, A. C., Botling, J., . . . Hirsch, F. R. (2018). PD-L1 Immunohistochemistry Comparability Study in Real-Life Clinical Samples: Results of Blueprint Phase 2 Project. Journal of Thoracic Oncology, 13(9), 1302-1311
Open this publication in new window or tab >>PD-L1 Immunohistochemistry Comparability Study in Real-Life Clinical Samples: Results of Blueprint Phase 2 Project
Show others...
2018 (English)In: Journal of Thoracic Oncology, ISSN 1556-0864, E-ISSN 1556-1380, Vol. 13, no 9, p. 1302-1311Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives: The Blueprint (BP) Programmed Death Ligand 1 (PD-L1) Immunohistochemistry Comparability Project is a pivotal academic/professional society and industrial collaboration to assess the feasibility of harmonizing the clinical use of five independently developed commercial PD-L1 immunohistochemistry assays. The goal of BP phase 2 (BP2) was to validate the results obtained in BP phase 1 by using real-world clinical lung cancer samples.

Methods: BP2 were conducted using 81 lung cancer specimens of various histological and sample types, stained with all five trial-validated PD-L1 assays (22C3, 28-8, SP142, SP263, and 73-10); the slides were evaluated by an international panel of pathologists. BP2 also assessed the reliability of PD-L1 scoring by using digital images, and samples prepared for cytological examination. PD-L1 expression was assessed for percentage (tumor proportional score) of tumor cell (TC) and immune cell areas showing PD-L1 staining, with TCs scored continuously or categorically with the cutoffs used in checkpoint inhibitor trials.

Results: The BP2 results showed highly comparable staining by the 22C3, 28-8 and SP263 assays; less sensitivity with the SP142 assay; and higher sensitivity with the 73-10 assay to detect PD-L1 expression on TCs. Glass slide and digital image scorings were highly concordant (Pearson correlation >0.96). There was very strong reliability among pathologists in TC PD-L1 scoring with all assays (overall intraclass correlation coefficient [ICC] = 0.86–0.93), poor reliability in IC PD-L1 scoring (overall ICC = 0.18–0.19), and good agreement in assessing PD-L1 status on cytological cell block materials (ICC = 0.78–0.85).

Conclusion: BP2 consolidates the analytical evidence for interchangeability of the 22C3, 28-8, and SP263 assays and lower sensitivity of the SP142 assay for determining tumor proportion score on TCs and demonstrates greater sensitivity of the 73-10 assay compared with that of the other assays.

Keywords
Immunooncology, Checkpoint inhibitors, Companion diagnostics, Complementary diagnostics, Cytology, Pathology
National Category
Cancer and Oncology Clinical Laboratory Medicine
Research subject
Pathology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-366281 (URN)10.1016/j.jtho.2018.05.013 (DOI)000444520200022 ()29800747 (PubMedID)
Funder
AstraZeneca
Available from: 2018-11-26 Created: 2018-11-26 Last updated: 2019-03-29Bibliographically approved
Organisations

Search in DiVA

Show all publications