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Nordström Skans, Oskar
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Publications (10 of 29) Show all publications
Björklund, M., Carlsson, M. & Nordström Skans, O. (2019). Fixed-Wage Contracts and Monetary Non-neutrality. American Economic Journal: Macroeconomics, 11(2), 171-192
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Fixed-Wage Contracts and Monetary Non-neutrality
2019 (English)In: American Economic Journal: Macroeconomics, ISSN 1945-7707, E-ISSN 1945-7715, Vol. 11, no 2, p. 171-192Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We study the importance of wage rigidities for the monetary policy transmission mechanism. Using uniquely rich micro data on Swedish wage negotiations, we isolate periods when the labor market is covered by fixed-wage contracts. Importantly, negotiations are coordinated in time but their seasonal patterns are far from deterministic. Using a two-regime VAR model, we document that monetary policy shocks have a larger impact on production during fixed-wage episodes as compared to the average response. The results do not seem to be driven by the periodic structure, nor the seasonality, of the renegotiation episodes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
AMER ECONOMIC ASSOC, 2019
National Category
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-382520 (URN)10.1257/mac.20160213 (DOI)000463028100005 ()
Funder
Ragnar Söderbergs stiftelse, E52/13
Available from: 2019-04-30 Created: 2019-04-30 Last updated: 2019-04-30Bibliographically approved
Harju, J., Kosonen, T. & Nordström Skans, O. (2018). Firm types, price-setting strategies, and consumption-tax incidence. Journal of Public Economics, 165, 48-72
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Firm types, price-setting strategies, and consumption-tax incidence
2018 (English)In: Journal of Public Economics, ISSN 0047-2727, E-ISSN 1879-2316, Vol. 165, p. 48-72Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We analyze price responses to large restaurant VAT rate reductions in two different European countries. Our results show that responses in the short and medium run were clustered around two focal points of zero pass-through and full pass-through. Differences between independent restaurants and chains is the key explanation for this pattern. While nearly all independent restaurants effectively ignored the tax reductions and left consumer prices unchanged, a substantial fraction of restaurants belonging to chains chose a rapid and complete pass-through. In the longer run, prices converged, but primarily through a price reversion among chain restaurants. The stark difference in price responses does not appear to arise because of different market characteristics such as location, initial price levels, meal types and restaurant segment.

Keywords
Firm types, VAT incidence, Price setting, Restaurants
National Category
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-369003 (URN)10.1016/j.jpubeco.2018.06.006 (DOI)000447483600004 ()
Available from: 2018-12-14 Created: 2018-12-14 Last updated: 2018-12-14Bibliographically approved
Fredriksson, P., Hensvik, L. & Nordström Skans, O. (2018). Mismatch of Talent: Evidence on Match Quality, Entry Wages, and Job Mobility. The American Economic Review, 108(11), 3303-3338
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mismatch of Talent: Evidence on Match Quality, Entry Wages, and Job Mobility
2018 (English)In: The American Economic Review, ISSN 0002-8282, E-ISSN 1944-7981, Vol. 108, no 11, p. 3303-3338Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We examine the impact of mismatch on entry wages, separations, and wage growth using unique data on worker talents. We show that workers are sorted on comparative advantage across jobs within occupations. The starting wages of inexperienced workers are unrelated to mismatch. For experienced workers, on the other hand, mismatch is negatively priced into their starting wages. Separations and wage growth are more strongly related to mismatch among inexperienced workers than among experienced workers. These findings are consistent with models of information updating, where less information is available about the quality of matches involving inexperienced workers.

National Category
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-369599 (URN)10.1257/aer.20160848 (DOI)000448528900007 ()
Funder
Marcus and Amalia Wallenberg FoundationRagnar Söderbergs stiftelse
Available from: 2018-12-18 Created: 2018-12-18 Last updated: 2018-12-18Bibliographically approved
Lombardi, S., Nordström Skans, O. & Vikström, J. (2018). Targeted wage subsidies and firm performance. Paper presented at 29th Annual Conference of the European-Association-of-Labour-Economists, SEP 21-23, 2017, St Gallen, SWITZERLAND. Labour Economics, 53, 33-45
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Targeted wage subsidies and firm performance
2018 (English)In: Labour Economics, ISSN 0927-5371, E-ISSN 1879-1034, Vol. 53, p. 33-45Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper studies how targeted wage subsidies affect the performance of the recruiting firms. Using Swedish administrative data from the period 1998-2008, we show that treated firms substantially outperform other recruiting firms after hiring through subsidies, despite identical pre-treatment performance levels and trends in a wide set of key dimensions. The pattern is less clear from 2007 onwards, after a reform removed the involvement of caseworkers from the subsidy approval process. Overall, our results suggest that targeted employment subsidies can have large positive effects on post-match outcomes of the hiring firms, at least if the policy environment allows for pre-screening by caseworkers.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV, 2018
Keywords
Wage subsidies, Labor demand, Firms performance
National Category
Economics Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-365988 (URN)10.1016/j.labeco.2018.04.002 (DOI)000444660100003 ()
Conference
29th Annual Conference of the European-Association-of-Labour-Economists, SEP 21-23, 2017, St Gallen, SWITZERLAND
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2016-00886
Available from: 2018-11-22 Created: 2018-11-22 Last updated: 2019-05-03Bibliographically approved
Björklund, M., Carlsson, M. & Nordström Skans, O. (2016). Fixed Wage Contracts and Monetary Non-Neutrality. Uppsala
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Fixed Wage Contracts and Monetary Non-Neutrality
2016 (English)Report (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

We study the importance of wage rigidities for the monetary policy transmissionmechanism. Using uniquely rich micro data on Swedish wage negotiations,we isolate periods when the labor market is covered by xed wagecontracts. Importantly, negotiations are coordinated in time but their seasonalpatterns are far from deterministic. Using a VAR model, we documentthat monetary policy shocks have a substantially larger impact on productionduring xed wage episodes as compared to the average response. The resultsare not driven by the periodic structure, nor the seasonality, of the renegotiationepisodes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Uppsala: , 2016. p. 30
Series
Working paper / Department of Economics, Uppsala University (Online), ISSN 1653-6975 ; 2016:10
Keywords
Monetary Policy, Wages, Nominal rigidities, Micro-data
National Category
Economics
Research subject
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-301159 (URN)
Available from: 2016-08-18 Created: 2016-08-18 Last updated: 2018-06-05Bibliographically approved
Lundin, M., Nordström-Skans, O. & Zetterberg, P. (2016). Leadership Experiences within Civil Organizations and Candidacy in Public Elections: Causal Evidence from a Quasi-Experimental Approach. Political Behavior, 38(2), 433-454
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Leadership Experiences within Civil Organizations and Candidacy in Public Elections: Causal Evidence from a Quasi-Experimental Approach
2016 (English)In: Political Behavior, ISSN 0190-9320, E-ISSN 1573-6687, Vol. 38, no 2, p. 433-454Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Standing as a candidate in public elections has been characterized as the ultimate act of political participation. We test the hypothesis that acquiring office within civil organizations increases the probability of becoming a candidate in public elections. In order to take self-selection problems into account, we provide quasi-experimental evidence using election discontinuities, in which we compare the likelihood of being nominated for public office between closely ranked winners and losers in Swedish student union (SU) elections. Our original data cover 5,000 SU candidates and register data on their candidacies in public elections (1991–2010). The analysis provides support to the hypothesis: Students elected to SU councils were about 34 percent (6 percentage points) more likely to become a candidate in a public election than SU council candidates who were not elected. The causal impact is fairly stable over time. The analysis makes important contributions to two interrelated bodies of literature: First, it provides political recruitment literature with causal evidence that acquiring leadership experiences at arenas outside of representative democ­ratic institutions facilitate entry into election processes. Second, it provides strong evidence to an increasingly contested issue within political participation research by showing that certain organizational activities increase individuals’ political involvement.

National Category
Political Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-270193 (URN)10.1007/s11109-015-9320-x (DOI)000374964200008 ()
Projects
Kåren och karriären: Kausala effekter av studentpolitiskt engagemang
Funder
Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy (IFAU), 148/09
Available from: 2015-12-22 Created: 2015-12-22 Last updated: 2017-12-01Bibliographically approved
Hensvik, L. & Nordström Skans, O. (2016). Social Networks, Employee Selection, and Labor Market Outcomes. Journal Labor Economics, 34(4), 825-867
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Social Networks, Employee Selection, and Labor Market Outcomes
2016 (English)In: Journal Labor Economics, ISSN 0734-306X, E-ISSN 1537-5307, Vol. 34, no 4, p. 825-867Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We provide a direct empirical test of Montgomery's 1991 notion that firms hire workers through social ties of productive employees as these workers know others with high unobserved productivity. We focus on coworker networks and show that firms recruit workers with better military draft test scores but shorter schooling when hiring previous colleagues of current employees, suggesting that firms use these networks to attract workers with better qualities in hard-to-observe dimensions. Incumbent workers' abilities predict the incidence, abilities, and wages of linked entrants. These results suggest that firms rely on the ability density of the studied networks when setting entry wages.

National Category
Economics and Business
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-305308 (URN)10.1086/686253 (DOI)000383857200001 ()
Funder
Ragnar Söderbergs stiftelseThe Jan Wallander and Tom Hedelius Foundation
Available from: 2016-10-18 Created: 2016-10-14 Last updated: 2019-09-09Bibliographically approved
Åslund, O., Bohlmark, A. & Nordström, O. S. (2015). Childhood and family experiences and the social integration of young migrants. Labour Economics, 35, 135-144
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Childhood and family experiences and the social integration of young migrants
2015 (English)In: Labour Economics, ISSN 0927-5371, E-ISSN 1879-1034, Vol. 35, p. 135-144Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We study how age at migration affects social integration in adulthood. Using Swedish register data, we estimate the effects of age at migration by comparing siblings arriving (as children) at the same time, but at different ages. Migrants who were older when they arrived are less likely to live close to, work with, and marry natives. We also study 2nd generation immigrants and show that parental time in the host country has similar (although somewhat weaker) effects for this group. The effects do not appear to be propagated through socioeconomic status. Instead, preferences or cultural identities appear as key mechanisms.

Keywords
Immigration, Age at migration, Siblings, Assimilation
National Category
Economics and Business
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-261256 (URN)10.1016/j.labeco.2015.05.004 (DOI)000359031500010 ()
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2013-0645
Available from: 2015-09-01 Created: 2015-08-31 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
Rosenqvist, O. & Nordström, O. S. (2015). Confidence enhanced performance? – The causal effects of success on future performance in professional golftournaments. Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization, 117, 281-295
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Confidence enhanced performance? – The causal effects of success on future performance in professional golftournaments
2015 (English)In: Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization, ISSN 0167-2681, E-ISSN 1879-1751, Vol. 117, p. 281-295Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper provides field evidence on the causal impact of past successes on future performances. Since persistence in success or failure is likely to be linked through, potentially time-varying, ability it is intrinsically difficult to identify the causal effect of succeeding on the probability of performing well in the future. We therefore employ a regression discontinuity design on data from professional golf tournaments exploiting that almost equally skilled players are separated into successes and failures half-way into the tournaments (the “cut”). We show that players who (marginally) succeeded in making the cut substantially increased their performance in subsequent tournaments relative to players who (marginally) failed to make the cut. This success-effect is substantially larger when the subsequent (outcome) tournament involves more prize money. The results therefore suggest that past successes provide an important prerequisite when performing high-stakes tasks.

Keywords
Confidence; Success; Performance; Hot hand; Regression discontinuity design; Golf
National Category
Economics
Research subject
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-263248 (URN)10.1016/j.jebo.2015.06.020 (DOI)000361578700019 ()
Available from: 2015-09-29 Created: 2015-09-29 Last updated: 2017-12-01Bibliographically approved
Åslund, O., Hensvik, L. & Nordström Skans, O. (2014). Seeking Similarity: How Immigrants and Natives Manage in the Labor Market. Journal Labor Economics, 32(3), 405-441
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Seeking Similarity: How Immigrants and Natives Manage in the Labor Market
2014 (English)In: Journal Labor Economics, ISSN 0734-306X, E-ISSN 1537-5307, Vol. 32, no 3, p. 405-441Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We investigate how the interplay between manager and worker origin affects hiring patterns, job separations, and wages. Numerous specifications utilizing a longitudinal matched employer-employee database including 70,000 establishments consistently show that managers are substantially more likely to hire workers of their own origin. Workers who share an origin with their managers earn higher wages and have lower separation rates than dissimilar workers, but this pattern is driven by differences in unobserved worker characteristics. Our findings indicate that the sorting patterns are more likely to be explained by profit-maximizing concerns than by preference-based discrimination.

National Category
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-231312 (URN)10.1086/674985 (DOI)000340135100002 ()
Available from: 2014-09-08 Created: 2014-09-07 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
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