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Ljungman, Gustaf
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Publications (10 of 91) Show all publications
Thorsell Cederberg, J., Weineland, S., Dahl, J. & Ljungman, G. (2019). A preliminary validation of the Swedish version of the Pain Catastrophizing Scale for Children (PCS-C) for children and adolescents with cancer. Journal of Pain Research, 12, 1803-1811
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A preliminary validation of the Swedish version of the Pain Catastrophizing Scale for Children (PCS-C) for children and adolescents with cancer
2019 (English)In: Journal of Pain Research, ISSN 1178-7090, E-ISSN 1178-7090, Vol. 12, p. 1803-1811Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives: Pain is reported as one of the most common and difficult symptoms for children and adolescents with cancer to cope with. Pain catastrophizing has been identified as a process clearly related to pain intensity and disability. The Pain Catastrophizing Scale for Children (PCS-C) has been validated in several languages and populations but remains to be validated in pediatric oncology. The aim of the study was to validate a Swedish version of the PCS-C for children and adolescents with cancer.

Methods: All children, 7-18 years of age, being treated for cancer in Sweden at the time of the study were invited to participate. Study material was sent out to the registered address. Internal consistency, test-retest reliability and convergent validity were calculated. Factor structure was examined using principal component analysis (PCA). Descriptive statistics were used to investigate background data and norm values.

Results: 61 children/adolescents were included in the analyses. The results did not support the original three-factor structure of the PCS-C, but rather suggested that a two-factor structure excluding item 8 best represented the data. The internal consistency of that solution was good (alpha=0.87), the test-rest reliability was excellent (ICC=0.75) and convergent validity was demonstrated (r=0.46). The mean (SD) for the PCS-C in the sample was 19.1 (9.2), without item 8. A statistically significant difference was shown between genders, where girls reported a higher level of pain catastrophizing than boys. No difference was found with regard to age.

Discussion: The Swedish version of the PCS-C is now preliminarily validated for children and adolescents with cancer, for whom gender- and age-specific norm values are now available. Questions remain regarding the optimal factor structure of the PCS-C.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
DOVE MEDICAL PRESS LTD, 2019
Keywords
The Pain Catastrophizing Scale for Children, instrument validation, children, adolescents, cancer, pain
National Category
Pediatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-387979 (URN)10.2147/JPR.S191378 (DOI)000470661700002 ()
Funder
Swedish Childhood Cancer Foundation, PR2013-0058Swedish Cancer Society, CAN2013/749
Available from: 2019-06-27 Created: 2019-06-27 Last updated: 2019-06-27Bibliographically approved
Scheer, M., Vokuhl, C., Blank, B., Hallmen, E., von Kalle, T., Muenter, M., . . . Koscielniak, E. (2019). Desmoplastic small round cell tumors: Multimodality treatment and new risk factors. Cancer Medicine, 8(2), 527-542
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Desmoplastic small round cell tumors: Multimodality treatment and new risk factors
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2019 (English)In: Cancer Medicine, ISSN 2045-7634, E-ISSN 2045-7634, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 527-542Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: To evaluate optimal therapy and potential risk factors.

Methods: Data of DSRCT patients <40 years treated in prospective CWS trials 1997‐2015 were analyzed.

Results: Median age of 60 patients was 14.5 years. Male:female ratio was 4:1. Tumors were abdominal/retroperitoneal in 56/60 (93%). 6/60 (10%) presented with a localized mass, 16/60 (27%) regionally disseminated nodes, and 38/60 (63%) with extraperitoneal metastases. At diagnosis, 23/60 (38%) patients had effusions, 4/60 (7%) a thrombosis, and 37/54 (69%) elevated CRP. 40/60 (67%) patients underwent tumor resection, 21/60 (35%) macroscopically complete. 37/60 (62%) received chemotherapy according to CEVAIE (ifosfamide, vincristine, actinomycin D, carboplatin, epirubicin, etoposide), 15/60 (25%) VAIA (ifosfamide, vincristine, adriamycin, actinomycin D) and, 5/60 (8%) P6 (cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, ifosfamide, etoposide). Nine received high‐dose chemotherapy, 6 received regional hyperthermia, and 20 received radiotherapy. Among 25 patients achieving complete remission, 18 (72%) received metronomic therapies. Three‐year event‐free (EFS) and overall survival (OS) were 11% (±8 confidence interval [CI] 95%) and 30% (±12 CI 95%), respectively, for all patients and 26.7% (±18.0 CI 95%) and 56.9% (±20.4 CI 95%) for 25 patients achieving remission. Extra‐abdominal site, localized disease, no effusion or ascites only, absence of thrombosis, normal CRP, complete tumor resection, and chemotherapy with VAIA correlated with EFS in univariate analysis. In multivariate analysis, significant factors were no thrombosis and chemotherapy with VAIA. In patients achieving complete remission, metronomic therapy with cyclophosphamide/vinblastine correlated with prolonged time to relapse.

Conclusion: Pleural effusions, venous thrombosis, and CRP elevation were identified as potential risk factors. The VAIA scheme showed best outcome. Maintenance therapy should be investigated further.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
WILEY, 2019
Keywords
C-reactive protein, desmoplastic small round cell tumor, maintenance therapy, soft tissue sarcoma, Trousseau's syndrome
National Category
Cancer and Oncology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-378728 (URN)10.1002/cam4.1940 (DOI)000459306700006 ()30652419 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-03-08 Created: 2019-03-08 Last updated: 2019-03-08Bibliographically approved
Eccleston, C., Fisher, E., Cooper, T. E., Gregoire, M.-C., Heathcote, L. C., Krane, E., . . . Zernikow, B. (2019). Pharmacological interventions for chronic pain in children: an overview of systematic reviews. Pain, 160(8), 1698-1707
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Pharmacological interventions for chronic pain in children: an overview of systematic reviews
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2019 (English)In: Pain, ISSN 0304-3959, E-ISSN 1872-6623, Vol. 160, no 8, p. 1698-1707Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We know little about the safety or efficacy of pharmacological medicines for children and adolescents with chronic pain, despite their common use. Our aim was to conduct an overview review of systematic reviews of pharmacological interventions that purport to reduce pain in children with chronic noncancer pain (CNCP) or chronic cancer-related pain (CCRP). We searched the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Medline, EMBASE, and DARE for systematic reviews from inception to March 2018. We conducted reference and citation searches of included reviews. We included children (0-18 years of age) with CNCP or CCRP. We extracted the review characteristics and primary outcomes of >= 30% participant-reported pain relief and patient global impression of change. We sifted 704 abstracts and included 23 systematic reviews investigating children with CNCP or CCRP. Seven of those 23 reviews included 6 trials that involved children with CNCP. There were no randomised controlled trials in reviews relating to reducing pain in CCRP. We were unable to combine data in a meta-analysis. Overall, the quality of evidence was very low, and we have very little confidence in the effect estimates. The state of evidence of randomized controlled trials in this field is poor; we have no evidence from randomised controlled trials for pharmacological interventions in children with cancer-related pain, yet cannot deny individual children access to potential pain relief.

Keywords
Adolescents, Cancer-related pain, Children, Chronic pain, Pharmacological interventions, Systematic review
National Category
Pediatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-393762 (URN)10.1097/j.pain.0000000000001609 (DOI)000480764500005 ()31335640 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-09-27 Created: 2019-09-27 Last updated: 2019-09-27Bibliographically approved
Loeffen, E. A. H., Kremer, L. C. M., van de Wetering, M. D., Mulder, R. L., Font-Gonzalez, A., Dupuis, L. L., . . . Zeltzer, L. (2019). Reducing pain in children with cancer: Methodology for the development of a clinical practice guideline. Pediatric Blood & Cancer, 66(6), Article ID e27698.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Reducing pain in children with cancer: Methodology for the development of a clinical practice guideline
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2019 (English)In: Pediatric Blood & Cancer, ISSN 1545-5009, E-ISSN 1545-5017, Vol. 66, no 6, article id e27698Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Although pain is one of the most prevalent and bothersome symptoms children with cancer experience, evidence-based guidance regarding assessment and management is lacking. With 44 international, multidisciplinary healthcare professionals and nine patient representatives, we aimed to develop a clinical practice guideline (following GRADE methodology), addressing assessment and pharmacological, psychological, and physical management of tumor-, treatment-, and procedure-related pain in children with cancer. In this paper, we present our thorough methodology for this development, including the challenges we faced and how we approached these. This lays the foundation for our clinical practice guideline, for which there is a high clinical demand.

Keywords
clinical practice guideline, evidence-based medicine, pain, pediatric oncology, supportive care
National Category
Cancer and Oncology Pediatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-383499 (URN)10.1002/pbc.27698 (DOI)000465150800067 ()30848078 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-05-17 Created: 2019-05-17 Last updated: 2019-05-17Bibliographically approved
Sparber-Sauer, M., Stegrnaier, S., Vokuhl, C., Seitz, G., von Kalle, T., Scheer, M., . . . Klingebiel, T. (2019). Rhabdomyosarcoma diagnosed in the first year of life: Localized, metastatic, and relapsed disease. Outcome data from five trials and one registry of the Cooperative Weichteilsarkom Studiengruppe (CWS). Pediatric Blood & Cancer, 66(6), Article ID e27652.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Rhabdomyosarcoma diagnosed in the first year of life: Localized, metastatic, and relapsed disease. Outcome data from five trials and one registry of the Cooperative Weichteilsarkom Studiengruppe (CWS)
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2019 (English)In: Pediatric Blood & Cancer, ISSN 1545-5009, E-ISSN 1545-5017, Vol. 66, no 6, article id e27652Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background

Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) diagnosed during the first year of life is reported to have poor outcome. Little is known about treatment and outcome data of relapsed disease (RD).

Methods

Characteristics, treatment, and outcome of 155 patients <= 12 months registered within the Cooperative Weichteilsarkom Studiengruppe (CWS) between 1981 and 2016 were evaluated.

Results

Localized disease (LD) was diagnosed in 144 patients and metastatic disease (MD) in 11. The histological diagnosis was alveolar (RMA) (n = 38, 23/25 examined patients PAX7/3:FOXO1-positive), embryonal (RME) (n = 100), botryoid (n = 10), anaplastic (n = 1), and spindle-cell RMS (n = 6). Multimodal treatment including conventional (age-adjusted) chemotherapy (CHT) (n = 150), resection (n = 137), and radiotherapy (RT) (n = 37) was administered. Complete remission was achieved in 129 of 144 patients with LD. RD occurred in 51 infants at a median age of 1.7 years (range, 0.3-8.8). Sixty-three percent of patients with RMA suffered RD, in contrast to 28% of patients with RME. Relapse treatment consisted of conventional CHT (n = 48), resection (n = 28), and RT (n = 21). The pattern of relapse and best resection were significant prognostic factors for patients with RD (P = 0.000 and P = 0.002). Late effects occurred as secondary malignancies in 6%, long-term toxicity in 21%, and resection-related impairment in 33% of the 105 surviving patients. The 5-year event-free survival and overall survival for infants with initial LD were 51% and 69%, 14% and 14% for patients with initial MD and 39% and 41% for relapsed patients, respectively.

Conclusion

Multimodal treatment including microscopically complete resection is strongly recommended to achieve a good prognosis in LD and RD of infants with RMS.

Keywords
CWS Group, infants, localized disease, metastatic disease, relapsed disease, rhabdomyosarcoma
National Category
Hematology Pediatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-383502 (URN)10.1002/pbc.27652 (DOI)000465150800058 ()30762282 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-05-17 Created: 2019-05-17 Last updated: 2019-05-17Bibliographically approved
Thorsell Cederberg, J., Weineland, S., Dahl, J. & Ljungman, G. (2019). Validation of the Swedish version of the Pain Catastrophizing Scale for Parents (PCS-P) for parents of children with cancer. Journal of Pain Research, 12, 1017-1023
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Validation of the Swedish version of the Pain Catastrophizing Scale for Parents (PCS-P) for parents of children with cancer
2019 (English)In: Journal of Pain Research, ISSN 1178-7090, E-ISSN 1178-7090, Vol. 12, p. 1017-1023Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives: Pain is reported as one of the most common and burdensome symptoms for children with cancer. Pain catastrophizing is clearly related to pain intensity and disability. Catastrophizing in parents is associated with both child functioning and parent distress. The Pain Catastrophizing Scale for Parents (PCS-P) remains to be validated for parents of children with cancer. The aim of the study was to validate the Swedish version of the PCS-P for parents of children with cancer experiencing pain.

Methods: Parents of all children who were being treated for cancer in Sweden at the time of the study were invited to participate. Study material was sent out to the registered address. Internal consistency, test-retest reliability, and convergent validity were calculated, and factor analysis was conducted. Descriptive statistics was used to investigate the background data and norm values.

Results: A total of 243 parents participated in the study. The results did not support the original three-factor structure of the PCS-P, but rather suggested that a two-factor structure best represented the data. The results showed excellent internal consistency (alpha=0.93), excellent temporal stability (intraclass correlation coefficient =0.86) and moderate convergent validity (rho=0.57). The mean (SD) for the PCS-P in the sample was 28.3 (10.7). A statistically significant difference was found between mothers and fathers, where mothers reported a higher level of pain catastrophizing than fathers.

Conclusion: The psychometric properties of the PCS-P has now been supported in a sample of parents of children with cancer, and norm values are now available. The factor structure does, however, deserve more investigation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
DOVE MEDICAL PRESS LTD, 2019
Keywords
The Pain Catastrophizing Scale for Parents (PCS-P), validation, parents, cancer, pain
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-381933 (URN)10.2147/JPR.S193164 (DOI)000462266800003 ()30936740 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Childhood Cancer Foundation, PR2013-0058Swedish Cancer Society, CAN2013/749
Available from: 2019-04-16 Created: 2019-04-16 Last updated: 2019-04-16Bibliographically approved
Thorsell Cederberg, J., Weineland, S., Dahl, J. & Ljungman, G. (2018). A preliminary validation of the Swedish short version of the Avoidance and Fusion Questionnaire for Youth (AFQ-Y8) for children and adolescents with cancer. Journal of Contextual Behavioral Science, 10, 103-107
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A preliminary validation of the Swedish short version of the Avoidance and Fusion Questionnaire for Youth (AFQ-Y8) for children and adolescents with cancer
2018 (English)In: Journal of Contextual Behavioral Science, ISSN 2212-1447, Vol. 10, p. 103-107Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Psychological inflexibility constitutes a generalized vulnerability for psychopathology. Children and adolescents undergoing cancer treatment are faced with numerous physical and psychological stressors throughout their cancer trajectory. Most of the survivors show resilience but some groups report psychological ill-health and poor quality-of-life long-term. Psychological flexibility has been shown to mediate improvements in psychological health for cancer patients. The Avoidance and Fusion Questionnaire for Youth (AFQ-Y) is the most frequently used measure of psychological inflexibility in children and adolescents. It correlates with a wide range of measures of mental health and long-term functional behavior. The aim of the study was to investigate norm values, psychometric properties and factor structure of the AFQ-Y8 for children and adolescents with cancer. All children and adolescents, aged 7-18 years of age, undergoing cancer treatment in Sweden at the time of the study were invited to participate. Norm values, internal consistency, test-retest reliability and convergent validity were calculated and an exploratory factor analysis was conducted. 62 children participated. The mean of the AFQ-Y8 in the sample was 10.30 (5.75). Internal consistency was acceptable (alpha = 0.76), test-retest reliability was good (ICC = 0.64) and convergent validity was demonstrated (r = 0.42). Norm values are now available, and the psychometric properties supported, for the AFQ-Y8 for children and adolescents with cancer. This provides implications for the prevention and treatment of psychopathology for this population. However, the one-factor structure of the AFQ-Y8 was not unequivocally supported. The results from the PCA rather suggested a two-factor structure. Due to the small sample of the study, the results should be seen as preliminary and further validation is warranted, specifically with regards to factorial validity and sensitivity to change.

Keywords
Psychological inflexibility, Cognitive fusion, Experiential avoidance, Psychological flexibility, Children and adolescents, Cancer
National Category
Psychiatry Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-371414 (URN)10.1016/j.jcbs.2018.09.004 (DOI)000450806800013 ()
Funder
Swedish Childhood Cancer Foundation, PR2013-0058Swedish Cancer Society, CAN2013/749
Available from: 2018-12-20 Created: 2018-12-20 Last updated: 2018-12-20Bibliographically approved
Ljungman, L., Cernvall, M., Ghaderi, A., Ljungman, G., von Essen, L. & Ljótsson, B. (2018). An open trial of individualized face-to-face cognitive behavior therapy for psychological distress in parents of children after end of treatment for childhood cancer including a cognitive behavioral conceptualization. PeerJ, 6, Article ID e4570.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>An open trial of individualized face-to-face cognitive behavior therapy for psychological distress in parents of children after end of treatment for childhood cancer including a cognitive behavioral conceptualization
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2018 (English)In: PeerJ, ISSN 2167-8359, E-ISSN 2167-8359, Vol. 6, article id e4570Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective

A subgroup of parents of children who have been treated for childhood cancer report high levels of psychological distress. To date there is no empirically supported psychological treatment targeting cancer-related psychological distress in this population. The aim of the current study was to test the feasibility and preliminarily evaluate the effect of individualized face-to-face cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) for parents of children after the end of treatment for childhood cancer. A secondary aim was to present a cognitive behavioral conceptualization of cancer-related distress for these parents.

Methods

An open trial was conducted where 15 parents of children who had completed successful treatment for cancer three months to five years earlier and who reported psychological distress related to a child’s previous cancer disease were provided CBT at a maximum of 15 sessions. Participants were assessed at baseline, post-intervention, and three-month follow-up using self-reported psychological distress (including posttraumatic stress symptoms (PTSS), depression, and anxiety) and the diagnostic Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview. Feasibility outcomes relating to recruitment, data collection, and delivery of the treatment were also examined. Individual case formulations for each participant guided the intervention and these were aggregated and presented in a conceptualization detailing core symptoms and their suggested maintenance mechanisms.

Results

A total of 93% of the participants completed the treatment and all of them completed the follow-up assessment. From baseline to post-assessment, parents reported significant improvements in PTSS, depression, and anxiety with medium to large effect sizes (Cohen’s d = 0.65–0.92). Results were maintained or improved at a three-month follow-up. At baseline, seven (47%) participants fulfilled the diagnostic criteria for major depressive disorder and four (29%) fulfilled the criteria for posttraumatic stress disorder, compared to none at a post-assessment and a follow-up assessment. The resulting cognitive behavioral conceptualization suggests traumatic stress and depression as the core features of distress, and avoidance and inactivity is suggested as the core maintenance mechanisms.

Conclusion

The treatment was feasible and acceptable to the participants. Significant improvements in distress were observed during the study. Overall, results suggest that the psychological treatment for parents of children after end of treatment for childhood cancer used in the current study is promising and should be tested and evaluated in future studies.

National Category
Cancer and Oncology Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-349407 (URN)10.7717/peerj.4570 (DOI)000429852600001 ()29666751 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, VR521-2010-3042; VR521-2014-3337Swedish Cancer Society, CAN2013/580;CAN2014/613
Available from: 2018-04-26 Created: 2018-04-26 Last updated: 2018-06-19Bibliographically approved
Wiman, H., Ander, M., Woodford, J., Hasselblad, T., Grönqvist, H., Ljungman, G., . . . von Essen, L. (2018). Guided Internet-Administered Self-Help to Reduce Symptoms of Anxiety and Depression Among Adolescents and Young Adults Diagnosed with Cancer During Adolescence: Lessons Learned. Paper presented at 50th congress of the International Society of Paediatric Oncology (SIOP), November 16-19, 2018, Kyoto, Japan.. Pediatric Blood & Cancer, 65(suppl.2), S597-S597
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Guided Internet-Administered Self-Help to Reduce Symptoms of Anxiety and Depression Among Adolescents and Young Adults Diagnosed with Cancer During Adolescence: Lessons Learned
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2018 (English)In: Pediatric Blood & Cancer, ISSN 1545-5009, E-ISSN 1545-5017, Vol. 65, no suppl.2, p. S597-S597Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
WILEY, 2018
National Category
Cancer and Oncology Hematology Pediatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-365107 (URN)000445195005115 ()
Conference
50th congress of the International Society of Paediatric Oncology (SIOP), November 16-19, 2018, Kyoto, Japan.
Available from: 2018-11-16 Created: 2018-11-16 Last updated: 2018-11-16Bibliographically approved
Englund, A., Glimelius, I., Rostgaard, K., Smedby, K. E., Eloranta, S., Molin, D., . . . Hjalgrim, L. L. (2018). Hodgkin lymphoma in children, adolescents and young adults - a comparative study of clinical presentation and treatment outcome.. Acta Oncologica, 57(2), 276-282
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Hodgkin lymphoma in children, adolescents and young adults - a comparative study of clinical presentation and treatment outcome.
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2018 (English)In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 57, no 2, p. 276-282Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) treatment protocols for children, adolescents and young adults traditionally differ, but the biological and clinical justification for this remains uncertain.

Material and methods: We compared age-dependent clinical presentation and treatment and outcome for 1072 classical HL patients 0–24 years diagnosed in Denmark (1990–2010) and Sweden (1992–2009) in pediatric (n = 315, Denmark <15 years, Sweden <18 years) or adult departments (n = 757). Distribution of clinical characteristics was assessed with Pearson’s chi2-test and Mantel–Haenszel trend test. The Kaplan–Meier method was used for survival analyses. Hazard ratios (HR) were used to compare the different treatment groups and calculated using Cox regression.

Results: Children (0–9 years) less often presented with advanced disease than adolescents (10–17 years) and young adults (18–24 years) (stage IIB-IV: children 32% vs. adolescents 50%, and adults 55%; p < .005). No variation in overall survival (OS) was seen between pediatric and adult departments or by country. Danish pediatric patients received radiotherapy (36%) less frequently than Swedish pediatric patients (71%) (p < .0001). Ten-year event-free survival (EFS) was lower among Danish pediatric patients (0–14 years) (0.79; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.70–0.86) than among Swedish pediatric patients (0–17 years) (0.88; 95% CI 0.83–0.92), HR (1.93; 95% CI 1.08–3.46). A similar pattern was seen between adult patients in the two countries: Denmark 10-year EFS 0.85 (95% CI 0.81–0.88), Sweden 0.88 (95% CI 0.84–0.91), adjusted HR 1.51 (95% CI 1.03–2.22).

Conclusion: Adolescents and young adults shared similar clinical presentation suggesting a rationale of harmonized treatment for these groups. Both adult and pediatric protocols provided high OS with no significant difference between the departments. The less frequent use of radiotherapy in Danish pediatric patients corresponded to a lower EFS, but comparable OS in all groups confirmed effective rescue strategies for the relapsing patients.

National Category
Cancer and Oncology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-343244 (URN)10.1080/0284186X.2017.1355563 (DOI)000423473200016 ()28760045 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Childhood Cancer Foundation, KF2014-0003; FTJH11/002Swedish Cancer Society, 2012/774; 2016/440
Available from: 2018-02-26 Created: 2018-02-26 Last updated: 2018-03-09Bibliographically approved
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