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Jaenson, Thomas G.T.ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-0780-7475
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 50) Show all publications
Hoffman, T., Lindeborg, M., Barboutis, C., Erciyas-Yavuz, K., Evander, M., Fransson, T., . . . Salaneck, E. (2018). Alkhurma Hemorrhagic Fever Virus RNA in Hyalomma rufipes Ticks Infesting Migratory Birds, Europe and Asia Minor. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 24(5), 879-882
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Alkhurma Hemorrhagic Fever Virus RNA in Hyalomma rufipes Ticks Infesting Migratory Birds, Europe and Asia Minor
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2018 (English)In: Emerging Infectious Diseases, ISSN 1080-6040, E-ISSN 1080-6059, Vol. 24, no 5, p. 879-882Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Alkhurma hemorrhagic fever virus RNA was detected in immature Hyalomma rufipes ticks infesting northward migratory birds caught in the North Mediterranean Basin. This finding suggests a role for birds in the ecology of the Alkhurma hemorrhagic fever virus and a potential mechanism for dissemination to novel regions. Increased surveillance is warranted.

National Category
Infectious Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-354104 (URN)10.3201/eid2405.171369 (DOI)000430355500010 ()29664386 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-06-19 Created: 2018-06-19 Last updated: 2018-06-19Bibliographically approved
Jaenson, T. G. .. & Petersson, E. (2017). [Dataset for forthcoming publication].
Open this publication in new window or tab >>[Dataset for forthcoming publication]
2017 (English)Data set, Aggregated data
National Category
Biological Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-334060 (URN)
Available from: 2017-11-20 Created: 2017-11-20 Last updated: 2018-01-04
Jaenson, T. G. T., Varv, K., Fröjdman, I., Jaaskelainen, A., Rundgren, K., Versteirt, V., . . . Golovljova, I. (2016). First evidence of established populations of the taiga tick Ixodes persulcatus (Acari: Ixodidae) in Sweden. Parasites & Vectors, 9, Article ID 377.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>First evidence of established populations of the taiga tick Ixodes persulcatus (Acari: Ixodidae) in Sweden
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2016 (English)In: Parasites & Vectors, ISSN 1756-3305, E-ISSN 1756-3305, Vol. 9, article id 377Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: The tick species Ixodes ricinus and I. persulcatus are of exceptional medical importance in the western and eastern parts, respectively, of the Palaearctic region. In Russia and Finland the range of I. persulcatus has recently increased. In Finland the first records of I. persulcatus are from 2004. The apparent expansion of its range in Finland prompted us to investigate if I. persulcatus also occurs in Sweden. Methods: Dog owners and hunters in the coastal areas of northern Sweden provided information about localities where ticks could be present. In May-August 2015 we used the cloth-dragging method in 36 localities potentially harbouring ticks in the Bothnian Bay area, province Norrbotten (NB) of northern Sweden. Further to the south in the provinces Vasterbotten (VB) and Uppland (UP) eight localities were similarly investigated. Results: Ixodes persulcatus was detected in 9 of 36 field localities in the Bothnian Bay area. Nymphs, adult males and adult females (n = 46 ticks) of I. persulcatus were present mainly in Alnus incana - Sorbus aucuparia - Picea abies - Pinus sylvestris vegetation communities on islands in the Bothnian Bay. Some of these I. persulcatus populations seem to be the most northerly populations so far recorded of this species. Dog owners asserted that their dogs became tick-infested on these islands for the first time 7-8 years ago. Moose (Alces alces), hares (Lepus timidus), domestic dogs (Canis lupus familiaris) and ground-feeding birds are the most likely carriers dispersing I. persulcatus in this area. All ticks (n = 124) from the more southern provinces of VB and UP were identified as I. ricinus. Conclusions: The geographical range of the taiga tick has recently expanded into northern Sweden. Increased information about prophylactic, anti-tick measures should be directed to people living in or visiting the coastal areas and islands of the Baltic Bay.

Keywords
Ixodes persulcatus, Ixodes ricinus, Taiga tick, Geographical distribution, Sweden, Bothnian Bay, Norrbotten, Moose, Alces alces, Tick-borne pathogens
National Category
Infectious Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-299858 (URN)10.1186/s13071-016-1658-3 (DOI)000378835700001 ()27370406 (PubMedID)
Funder
Carl Tryggers foundation Helge Ax:son Johnsons stiftelse Magnus Bergvall FoundationEU, European Research Council, OC/EFSA/AHAW/2013/02-FWC1
Available from: 2016-07-28 Created: 2016-07-28 Last updated: 2017-11-28Bibliographically approved
Jaenson, T. (2016). Nya rön: Fästingen bär ofta på mer än en art av patogen mikroorganism. Läkartidningen, 113(17)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Nya rön: Fästingen bär ofta på mer än en art av patogen mikroorganism
2016 (Swedish)In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 113, no 17Article in journal (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: , 2016
Keywords
Fästing, co-infektioner, Borrelia, TBE, saminfektioner, Ixodes ricinus
National Category
Other Natural Sciences Other Medical Sciences not elsewhere specified
Research subject
Infectious Diseases
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-287333 (URN)
Available from: 2016-04-22 Created: 2016-04-22 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
Jaenson, T. (2016). Taigafästingen nu i norra Sverige. Läkartidningen, 113(D6PP)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Taigafästingen nu i norra Sverige
2016 (Swedish)In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 113, no D6PPArticle in journal (Refereed) Published
Keywords
Taiga tick, Tick, Ixodes persulcatus, TBE, Ixodes persulcatus, taigafästing, fästing, TBE
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Epidemiology; Infectious Diseases
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-312237 (URN)
Available from: 2017-01-08 Created: 2017-01-08 Last updated: 2017-11-29Bibliographically approved
Labbé, L. S., Tolf, C., Larsson, S., Wilhelmsson, P., Salaneck, E., Jaenson, T. G. T., . . . Waldenstrom, J. (2015). Candidatus Neoehrlichia mikurensis in Ticks from Migrating Birds in Sweden. PLoS ONE, 10(7), Article ID e0133250.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Candidatus Neoehrlichia mikurensis in Ticks from Migrating Birds in Sweden
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2015 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 10, no 7, article id e0133250Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Candidatus Neoehrlichia mikurensis (CNM; family Anaplasmataceae) was recently recognized as a potential tick-borne human pathogen. The presence of CNM in mammals, in host-seeking Ixodes ticks and in ticks attached to mammals and birds has been reported recently. We investigated the presence of CNM in ornithophagous ticks from migrating birds. A total of 1,150 ticks (582 nymphs, 548 larvae, 18 undetermined ticks and two adult females) collected from 5,365 birds captured in south-eastern Sweden was screened for CNM by molecular methods. The birds represented 65 different species, of which 35 species were infested with one or more ticks. Based on a combination of morphological and molecular species identification, the majority of the ticks were identified as Ixodes ricinus. Samples were initially screened by real-time PCR targeting the CNM 16S rRNA gene, and confirmed by a second real-time PCR targeting the groEL gene. For positive samples, a 1260 base pair fragment of the 16S rRNA gene was sequenced. Based upon bacterial gene sequence identification, 2.1% (24/1150) of the analysed samples were CNM-positive. Twenty-two out of 24 CNM-positive ticks were molecularly identified as I. ricinus nymphs, and the remaining two were identified as I. ricinus based on morphology. The overall CNM prevalence in I. ricinus nymphs was 4.2%. None of the 548 tested larvae was positive. CNM-positive ticks were collected from 10 different bird species. The highest CNM-prevalences were recorded in nymphs collected from common redpoll (Carduelis flammea, 3/7), thrush nightingale (Luscinia luscinia, 2/29) and dunnock (Prunella modularis, 1/17). The 16S rRNA sequences obtained in this study were all identical to each other and to three previously reported European strains, two of which were obtained from humans. It is concluded that ornithophagous ticks may be infected with CNM and that birds most likely can disperse CNM-infected ticks over large geographical areas.

National Category
Infectious Medicine Microbiology in the medical area
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-260844 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0133250 (DOI)000358622000071 ()
Funder
Carl Tryggers foundation Magnus Bergvall Foundation
Note

Funding for this study came from the Medical Research Council of Southeast Sweden (grant numbers FORSS-307591 and FORSS-387231), Carl Trygger's Foundation for Scientific Research, Langmanska kulturfonden, Magnus Bergvall's Foundation for Scientific Research, Helge Ax:son Johnson's Foundation and the EU Interreg IVA project ScandTick.

Available from: 2015-08-25 Created: 2015-08-25 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved
Jaenson, T. (2015). Sjukdomsorsakande insekter och kvalster (1ed.). In: Annelie Braunier (Ed.), Medicinsk mikrobiologi & immunologi: (pp. 606-618). Lund: Studentlitteratur AB
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sjukdomsorsakande insekter och kvalster
2015 (Swedish)In: Medicinsk mikrobiologi & immunologi / [ed] Annelie Braunier, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2015, 1, p. 606-618Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2015 Edition: 1
Keywords
Medical entomology, Vector biology, Ticks, Lyme disease, TBE, Mosquitoes, Malaria mosquitoes, Ixodes ricinus, Anopheles, Culex, medicinsk entomologi, fästingar, TBE, borrelia, borrelios, stickmyggor, malariamyggor
National Category
Infectious Medicine Dermatology and Venereal Diseases Microbiology in the medical area
Research subject
Infectious Diseases; Immunology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-284341 (URN)978-91-44-03868-1 (ISBN)
Available from: 2016-04-17 Created: 2016-04-17 Last updated: 2018-01-10Bibliographically approved
Hagman, K., Barboutis, C., Ehrenborg, C., Fransson, T., Jaenson, T. G., Lindgren, P.-E., . . . Salaneck, E. (2014). On the potential roles of ticks and migrating birds in the ecology of West Nile virus. Infection Ecology & Epidemiology, 4, 20943
Open this publication in new window or tab >>On the potential roles of ticks and migrating birds in the ecology of West Nile virus
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2014 (English)In: Infection Ecology & Epidemiology, ISSN 2000-8686, E-ISSN 2000-8686, Vol. 4, p. 20943-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Mosquitoes are the primary vectors of West Nile virus (WNV). Ticks have, however, been suggested to be potential reservoirs of WNV. In order to investigate their role in the spread of the virus, ticks, which had been collected from birds migrating northwards from Africa to Europe, were analyzed for the potential presence of WNV-RNA.

METHODS: On the Mediterranean islands Capri and Antikythira a total of 14,824 birds were captured and investigated from which 747 ticks were collected.

RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: Most of the identified ticks (93%) were nymphs and larvae of Hyalomma marginatum sensu lato, most of which were or appear to be Hyalomma rufipes. Of these ticks 729 were individually screened for WNV-RNA. None of the ticks was found to be WNV positive. Thus, there was no evidence that Hyalomma marginatum s.l. ticks play a role in the spread of WNV from Africa to Europe.

National Category
Basic Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-237462 (URN)10.3402/iee.v4.20943 (DOI)24455105 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2014-12-02 Created: 2014-12-02 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved
Terenius, O., Börklund, N., Jaenson, T. G. T. & Nordlander, G. (2014). Premature Proposal of the Pine Weevil as a Vector of a Human Pathogen [Letter to the editor]. Journal of Clinical Microbiology, 58(11), 4115-4115
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Premature Proposal of the Pine Weevil as a Vector of a Human Pathogen
2014 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Microbiology, ISSN 0095-1137, E-ISSN 1098-660X, Vol. 58, no 11, p. 4115-4115Article in journal, Letter (Refereed) Published
National Category
Microbiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-240661 (URN)10.1128/JCM.02167-14 (DOI)000344159500058 ()25324238 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2015-01-08 Created: 2015-01-08 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Pettersson, J.-O. H. O., Golovljova, I., Vene, S. & Jaenson, T. G. .. (2014). Prevalence of tick-borne encephalitis virus in Ixodes ricinus ticks in northern Europe with particular reference to southern Sweden. Parasites & Vectors, 7, 102
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Prevalence of tick-borne encephalitis virus in Ixodes ricinus ticks in northern Europe with particular reference to southern Sweden
2014 (English)In: Parasites & Vectors, ISSN 1756-3305, E-ISSN 1756-3305, Vol. 7, p. 102-Article in journal (Other academic) Published
Keywords
Ixodes ricinus, minimum infection rate, RT-PCR, Sweden, Norway, Denmark, Finland, TBE, tick-borne encephalitis virus, virus prevalence.
National Category
Biological Sciences Microbiology in the medical area Microbiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-210857 (URN)10.1186/1756-3305-7-102 (DOI)000335074400002 ()
Available from: 2013-11-19 Created: 2013-11-15 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved
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Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-0780-7475

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