uu.seUppsala University Publications
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Bali, Ranjula
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 71) Show all publications
Sepahvand, M. H., Shahbazian, R. & Bali Swain, R. (2019). Does revolution change risk attitudes?: Evidence from Burkina Faso. Uppsala: Uppsala University
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Does revolution change risk attitudes?: Evidence from Burkina Faso
2019 (English)Report (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

A popular uprising in 2014, led to a revolution overthrowing the sitting president of Burkina Faso. We investigate if individuals’ risk attitudes changed due to this revolution. Specifically, we investigate the impact of the revolution on risk attitudes, by gender, age and level of education. The analysis is based on a unique nationally representative panel Household Budget Survey, which allows us to track the changes in the risk attitudes of the same individuals before, during and after the revolution. Our results suggest that the impact of the revolution is short-term. Individuals become risk averse during the revolution but converge back to the pre-revolution risk attitudes, slightly increasing their risk taking, after the revolution is over. Women are more risk taking than the men after the revolution but are more risk averse during the revolution. In general, older individuals tend to have higher risk aversion than the younger individuals.  During the revolution, however, the individuals with higher level of education are less willing to take risk.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Uppsala: Uppsala University, 2019. p. 38
Series
Working paper / Department of Economics, Uppsala University (Online), ISSN 1653-6975 ; 2019:2
Keywords
exogenous shock; revolution; gender; Burkina Faso
National Category
Economics
Research subject
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-376700 (URN)
Available from: 2019-02-08 Created: 2019-02-08 Last updated: 2019-02-08Bibliographically approved
Nsabimana, A., Bali, R., Surry, Y. & Ngabitsinze, J. (2019). Income and food Engel Curves in Rwanda: A household microdata analysis. , 11
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Income and food Engel Curves in Rwanda: A household microdata analysis
2019 (English)In: Vol. 11Article in journal (Refereed) In press
Abstract [en]

Food insecurity and malnutrition are still major challenges for large proportions of households in Sab-Saharan Africa. The empirical literature on food demand, however, suggest mixed evidence on the roles of income and other socio-economic attributes on food demand. This study analyses the food demand amongst households in Rwanda, based on nationally representative household expenditure and demographic (EICV4, 2013/14) survey data. The results show that poor households consume food containing higher carbohydrates and starches. Further, the study findsthat majority of rural households spend sparingly on micronutrients from animal products, suggesting that effective targeted food policy interventions for poor and rural households may play important role in reducing incidence of malnutrition through improving food diets.

Keywords
Food Engel curve, household food demand, Sub-Saharan Africa
National Category
Economics
Research subject
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-393913 (URN)
Available from: 2019-09-28 Created: 2019-09-28 Last updated: 2019-09-28
Bali, R. & Garikipati, S. (2019). Microfinancein the Global South: Examining Evidence on Social Efficacy. In: G. Berik and E. Kongar (Ed.), Handbook of Feminist Economics: . Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Microfinancein the Global South: Examining Evidence on Social Efficacy
2019 (English)In: Handbook of Feminist Economics / [ed] G. Berik and E. Kongar, Routledge, 2019Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2019
Keywords
microfinance, women empowerment, social efficacy
National Category
Economics
Research subject
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-393914 (URN)
Available from: 2019-09-28 Created: 2019-09-28 Last updated: 2019-09-28
Bali, R. (Ed.). (2017). Environmental Challenges in the Baltic Region. London: Palgrave Macmillan
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Environmental Challenges in the Baltic Region
2017 (English)Collection (editor) (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This book explores environmental challenges in the Baltic region from an economic perspective. Featuring contributions from regional experts from Nordic, Baltic and Eastern European countries it addresses the response to eutrophication caused by increased loads of nutrients to the sea from agriculture, wastewater, industry and traffic, and cost-effective solutions to reach the Baltic Sea Action Plan (BSAP) targets, set up through the Helsinki Commission (HELCOM). Contributions also explore the environmental impacts of rural landscape change during the post-communist period in the Baltic Sea region and a review of the ex-post evaluations of the costs and benefits generated by Baltic Sea nutrient abatement policies. Public policies towards marine protection, wind power establishment, and attitudes to paying for environmental protection, environmental resilience and the international cooperation in the Baltic region are also discussed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2017
Keywords
Environmental Economics, Baltic region, Eastern Europe
National Category
Economics
Research subject
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-329512 (URN)978-3-319-56006-9 (ISBN)978-3-319-56007-6 (ISBN)
Available from: 2017-09-18 Created: 2017-09-18 Last updated: 2019-09-20Bibliographically approved
Spaiser, V., Ranganathan, S., Bali Swain, R. & Sumpter, D. J. T. (2017). The Sustainable Development Oxymoron: Quantifying and Modelling the Incompatibility of Sustainable Development Goals. International Journal of Sustainable Development and World Ecology, 24(6), 457-470
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Sustainable Development Oxymoron: Quantifying and Modelling the Incompatibility of Sustainable Development Goals
2017 (English)In: International Journal of Sustainable Development and World Ecology, ISSN 1350-4509, E-ISSN 1745-2627, Vol. 24, no 6, p. 457-470Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In 2015, the UN adopted a new set of Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) to eradicate poverty, establish socioeconomic inclusion and protect the environment. Critical voices such as the International Council for Science (ICSU), however, have expressed concerns about the potential incompatibility of the SDGs, specifically the incompatibility of socio-economic development and environmental sustainability. In this paper, we test, quantify and model the alleged inconsistency of SDGs. Our analyses show which SDGs are consistent and which are conflicting. We measure the extent of inconsistency and conclude that the SDG agenda will fail as a whole if we continue with business as usual. We further explore the nature of the inconsistencies using dynamical systems models, which reveal that the focus on economic growth and consumption as a means for development underlies the inconsistency. Our models also show that there are factors which can contribute to development (health programmes, government investment) on the one hand and ecological sustainability (renewable energy) on the other, without triggering the conflict between incompatible SDGs.

National Category
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-320151 (URN)10.1080/13504509.2016.1235624 (DOI)000410913600001 ()
Available from: 2017-04-16 Created: 2017-04-16 Last updated: 2017-12-19Bibliographically approved
Li, C.-Z. & Bali, R. (2016). Growth, Water Resilience, and Sustainability: A DSGE Model Applied to South Africa. Water Economics and Policy, 2(4), Article ID UNSP 1650022.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Growth, Water Resilience, and Sustainability: A DSGE Model Applied to South Africa
2016 (English)In: Water Economics and Policy, ISSN 2382-624X, E-ISSN 2382-6258, Vol. 2, no 4, article id UNSP 1650022Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this paper, we develop a dynamic stochastic general equilibrium (DSGE) model to study how water resilience affects economic growth and dynamic welfare with special reference to South Africa. While water may become a limiting factor for future development in general, as a drought prone and water poor country with rapid population growth, South Africa may face more serious challenges for sustainable development. Analyzing the DSGE model, we conduct numerical simulations for different parameter configurations with varying discount rate, climate change scenario, and the degree of uncertainty in future precipitation. We find that with sufficient capital accumulation, development may still be sustainable despite increased future water scarcity and decreased long-run sustainable welfare. While stochastic variation in precipitation has a negative effect on water resilience and the expected dynamic welfare, the effect is mitigated by persistence in the precipitation pattern. With heavier time discounting and lower capital formation, however, the current welfare may not be sustained.

Keywords
Water resilience, growth, dynamic welfare, sustainability
National Category
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-320149 (URN)10.1142/S2382624X16500223 (DOI)000399996100004 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council FormasSwedish Research Council
Available from: 2017-04-16 Created: 2017-04-16 Last updated: 2017-05-19Bibliographically approved
Bali Swain, R. (2016). The impact of microfinance on factors empowering women: Differences in regional and delivery mechanisms in India's SHG programme. Journal of Development Studies
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The impact of microfinance on factors empowering women: Differences in regional and delivery mechanisms in India's SHG programme
2016 (English)In: Journal of Development Studies, ISSN 0022-0388, E-ISSN 1743-9140, ISSN ISSN 0022-0388Article in journal (Refereed) In press
Abstract [en]

We examine how the impact on women empowerment varies with respect to the location and type of group linkage of the respondent. Using household survey data from five states in India, we correct for selection bias to estimate a structural equation model. Our results reveal that in the southern states of India empowerment of women takes place through economic factors. For the other states, we find a significant correlation between women empowerment and autonomy in women’s decision-making and network, communication and political participation respectively. We do not however find any differential causal impact of different delivery methods (linkage models).

Keywords
microfinance, women empowerment, structural equation models, self help groups
National Category
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-262051 (URN)
Available from: 2015-09-07 Created: 2015-09-07 Last updated: 2017-12-04
Li, C.-Z. & Bali Swain, R. (2015). Growth. Water Resilience and Sustainability: A DSGE Model Applied to South Africa. Stockholm
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Growth. Water Resilience and Sustainability: A DSGE Model Applied to South Africa
2015 (English)Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: , 2015
Series
Beijer Discussion Paper Series ; 251
Keywords
Water resilience, growth, dynamic welfare, sustainability, climate change
National Category
Economics
Research subject
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-248572 (URN)
Available from: 2015-04-01 Created: 2015-04-01 Last updated: 2015-05-05Bibliographically approved
Ranganathan, S., Bali Swain, R. & Sumpter, D. (2015). The demographic transition and economic growth: implications for development policy. Palgrave Communications, 1(15033)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The demographic transition and economic growth: implications for development policy
2015 (English)In: Palgrave Communications, Vol. 1, no 15033Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

An important transition in the economic history of countries occurs when they move from a regime of low prosperity, high child mortality and high fertility to a state of high prosperity, low child mortality and low fertility. Researchers have proposed various theories to explain this demographic transition and its relation to economic growth. In this article, we test the validity of some of these theories by fitting a non-linear dynamic model for the available cross-country data. Our approach fills the gap between the micro-level models that discuss causative mechanisms but do not consider if alternative models may fit the data well, and models from growth econometrics that show the impact of different factors on economic growth but do not include non-linearities and complex interactions. In our model, mortality and fertility decline and economic growth are endogenized by considering a simultaneous system of equations in the change variables. The model shows that the transition is best described in terms of a development cycle involving child mortality, fertility and GDP per capita. Fertility rate decreases when child mortality is low, and is weakly dependent on GDP. As fertility rates fall, GDP increases, and as GDP increases, child mortality falls. We further test the hypothesis that female education drives down fertility rates rather than child mortality, but find only weak evidence for it. The Bayesian methodology we use ensures robust models and we identify non-linear interactions between indicators to capture real-world non-linearities. Hence, our models can be used in policymaking to predict short-term evolutions in the indicator variables. We also discuss how our approach can be used to evaluate policy initiatives such as the Millennium Development Goals or the Sustainable Development Goals and set more accurate, country-specific development targets.

National Category
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-265902 (URN)​10.1057/palcomms.2015.33 (DOI)
Available from: 2015-11-03 Created: 2015-11-03 Last updated: 2016-02-03
Ranganathan, S., Bali Swain, R. & Sumpter, D. J. . (2014). A Dynamical Systems Approach to Modeling Human Development.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Dynamical Systems Approach to Modeling Human Development
2014 (English)Report (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

A key aim of economics is to set goals and investigate the relationship between various socio-economic indicators. By tting time series data using a Bayesian dynamical systems approach we identify non-linear interactions between GDP, child mortality, fertility rate and female education. We show that reduction in child mortality is best predicted by the level of GDP in a country over the preceding 5 years. Fertility rate decreases when current or predicted child mortality is low, and is weakly dependent on female education and economic growth. As fertility drops, GDP increases producing a cycle that drives the demographic transition.

Publisher
p. 42
Series
Working paper / Department of Economics, Uppsala University (Online), ISSN 1653-6975 ; 2014:9
National Category
Economics
Research subject
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-235541 (URN)
Available from: 2014-11-05 Created: 2014-11-05 Last updated: 2015-02-05Bibliographically approved
Organisations

Search in DiVA

Show all publications