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Karlsson, T., Rask-Andersen, M., Pan, G., Höglund, J., Wadelius, C., Ek, W. E. & Johansson, Å. (2019). Contribution of genetics to visceral adiposity and its relation to cardiovascular and metabolic disease.. Nature Medicine, 25(9), 1390-1395
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Contribution of genetics to visceral adiposity and its relation to cardiovascular and metabolic disease.
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2019 (English)In: Nature Medicine, ISSN 1078-8956, E-ISSN 1546-170X, Vol. 25, no 9, p. 1390-1395Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Visceral adipose tissue (VAT)-fat stored around the internal organs-has been suggested as an independent risk factor for cardiovascular and metabolic disease1-3, as well as all-cause, cardiovascular-specific and cancer-specific mortality4,5. Yet, the contribution of genetics to VAT, as well as its disease-related effects, are largely unexplored due to the requirement for advanced imaging technologies to accurately measure VAT. Here, we develop sex-stratified, nonlinear prediction models (coefficient of determination = 0.76; typical 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.74-0.78) for VAT mass using the UK Biobank cohort. We performed a genome-wide association study for predicted VAT mass and identified 102 novel visceral adiposity loci. Predicted VAT mass was associated with increased risk of hypertension, heart attack/angina, type 2 diabetes and hyperlipidemia, and Mendelian randomization analysis showed visceral fat to be a causal risk factor for all four diseases. In particular, a large difference in causal effect between the sexes was found for type 2 diabetes, with an odds ratio of 7.34 (95% CI = 4.48-12.0) in females and an odds ratio of 2.50 (95% CI = 1.98-3.14) in males. Our findings bolster the role of visceral adiposity as a potentially independent risk factor, in particular for type 2 diabetes in Caucasian females. Independent validation in other cohorts is necessary to determine whether the findings can translate to other ethnicities, or outside the UK.

National Category
Medical Genetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-392977 (URN)10.1038/s41591-019-0563-7 (DOI)000484832800021 ()31501611 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish National Infrastructure for Computing (SNIC), b2016021Swedish National Infrastructure for Computing (SNIC), sens2017538Swedish Society for Medical Research (SSMF)Swedish Research Council, 2015-03327Göran Gustafsson Foundation for Research in Natural Sciences and MedicineÅke Wiberg Foundation, M16-0210Swedish Heart Lung Foundation, 20170484Swedish Diabetes AssociationScience for Life Laboratory - a national resource center for high-throughput molecular bioscience
Available from: 2019-09-12 Created: 2019-09-12 Last updated: 2019-10-17Bibliographically approved
Johansson, Å., Rask-Andersen, M., Karlsson, T. & Ek, W. E. (2019). Genome-wide association analysis of 350 000 Caucasians from the UK Biobank identifies novel loci for asthma, hay fever and eczema.. Human Molecular Genetics, Article ID ddz175.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Genome-wide association analysis of 350 000 Caucasians from the UK Biobank identifies novel loci for asthma, hay fever and eczema.
2019 (English)In: Human Molecular Genetics, ISSN 0964-6906, E-ISSN 1460-2083, article id ddz175Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Even though heritability estimates suggest that the risk of asthma, hay fever and eczema is largely due to genetic factors, previous studies have not explained a large part of the genetics behind these diseases. In this GWA study, we include 346 545 Caucasians from the UK Biobank to identify novel loci for asthma, hay fever and eczema and replicate novel loci in three independent cohorts. We further investigate if associated lead SNPs have a significantly larger effect for one disease compared to the other diseases, to highlight possible disease specific effects. We identified 141 loci, of which 41 are novel, to be associated (P ≤ 3x10-8) with asthma, hay fever or eczema, analysed separately or as disease phenotypes that includes the presence of different combinations of these diseases. The largest number of loci were associated with the combined phenotype (asthma/hay fever/eczema). However, as many as 20 loci had a significantly larger effect on hay fever/eczema-only compared to their effects on asthma, while 26 loci exhibited larger effects on asthma compared with their effects on hay fever/eczema. At four of the novel loci, TNFRSF8, MYRF, TSPAN8, and BHMG1, the lead SNPs were in LD (> 0.8) with potentially casual missense variants. Our study shows that a large amount of the genetic contribution is shared between the diseases. Nonetheless, a number of SNPs have a significantly larger effect on one of the phenotypes suggesting that part of the genetic contribution is more phenotype specific.

National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-392909 (URN)10.1093/hmg/ddz175 (DOI)31361310 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-09-11 Created: 2019-09-11 Last updated: 2019-09-12
Rask-Andersen, M., Karlsson, T., Ek, W. E. & Johansson, Å. (2019). Genome-wide association study of body fat distribution identifies adiposity loci and sex-specific genetic effects. Nature Communications, 10, Article ID 339.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Genome-wide association study of body fat distribution identifies adiposity loci and sex-specific genetic effects
2019 (English)In: Nature Communications, ISSN 2041-1723, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 10, article id 339Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Body mass and body fat composition are of clinical interest due to their links to cardiovascular- and metabolic diseases. Fat stored in the trunk has been suggested to be more pathogenic compared to fat stored in other compartments. In this study, we perform genome-wide association studies (GWAS) for the proportion of body fat distributed to the arms, legs and trunk estimated from segmental bio-electrical impedance analysis (sBIA) for 362,499 individuals from the UK Biobank. 98 independent associations with body fat distribution are identified, 29 that have not previously been associated with anthropometric traits. A high degree of sex-heterogeneity is observed and the effects of 37 associated variants are stronger in females compared to males. Our findings also implicate that body fat distribution in females involves mesenchyme derived tissues and cell types, female endocrine tissues as well as extracellular matrix maintenance and remodeling.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
NATURE PUBLISHING GROUP, 2019
National Category
Cell and Molecular Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-376829 (URN)10.1038/s41467-018-08000-4 (DOI)000456164400001 ()30664634 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Society for Medical Research (SSMF)Göran Gustafsson Foundation for promotion of scientific research at Uppala University and Royal Institute of TechnologySwedish Heart Lung FoundationÅke Wiberg Foundation
Available from: 2019-02-11 Created: 2019-02-11 Last updated: 2019-02-11Bibliographically approved
Jiang, J., Thalamuthu, A., Ho, J. E., Mahajan, A., Ek, W. E., Brown, D. A., . . . Mather, K. A. (2018). A Meta-Analysis of Genome-Wide Association Studies of Growth Differentiation Factor-15 Concentration in Blood. Frontiers in Genetics, 9, Article ID 97.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Meta-Analysis of Genome-Wide Association Studies of Growth Differentiation Factor-15 Concentration in Blood
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2018 (English)In: Frontiers in Genetics, ISSN 1664-8021, E-ISSN 1664-8021, Vol. 9, article id 97Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Blood levels of growth differentiation factor-15 (GDF-15), also known as macrophage inhibitory cytokine-1 (MIC-1), have been associated with various pathological processes and diseases, including cardiovascular disease and cancer. Prior studies suggest genetic factors play a role in regulating blood MIC-1/GDF-15 concentration. In the current study, we conducted the largest genome-wide association study (GWAS) to date using a sample of similar to 5,400 community-based Caucasian participants, to determine the genetic variants associated with MIC-1/GDF-15 blood concentration. Conditional and joint (COJO), gene-based association, and gene-set enrichment analyses were also carried out to identify novel loci, genes, and pathways. Consistent with prior results, a locus on chromosome 19, which includes nine single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) (top SNP, rs888663, p = 1.690 x 10(-35)), was significantly associated with blood MIC-1/GDF-15 concentration, and explained 21.47% of its variance. COJO analysis showed evidence for two independent signals within this locus. Gene-based analysis confirmed the chromosome 19 locus association and in addition, a putative locus on chromosome 1. Gene-set enrichment analyses showed that the "COPI-mediated anterograde transport" gene-set was associated with MIC-1/GDF15 blood concentration with marginal significance after FDR correction (p = 0.067). In conclusion, a locus on chromosome 19 was associated with MIC-1/GDF-15 blood concentration with genome-wide significance, with evidence for a new locus (chromosome 1). Future studies using independent cohorts are needed to confirm the observed associations especially for the chromosomes 1 locus, and to further investigate and identify the causal SNPs that contribute to MIC-1/GDF-15 levels.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Media S.A., 2018
Keywords
genome-wide association study, growth differentiation factor-15, macrophage inhibitory cytokine-1, community-based individuals, chromosome 19
National Category
Medical Genetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-354354 (URN)10.3389/fgene.2018.00097 (DOI)000428198300001 ()
Funder
Knut and Alice Wallenberg FoundationEU, European Research CouncilSwedish Research Council, 2012-1397Swedish Research Council, 2012-1727Swedish Research Council, 2012-2215Swedish Research Council, 80576801Swedish Research Council, 70374401Swedish Foundation for Strategic Research Australian Research Council, DP0774213Australian Research Council, DP0773584Australian Research Council, LP0669645
Available from: 2018-08-08 Created: 2018-08-08 Last updated: 2018-08-08Bibliographically approved
Ek, W. E., Karlsson, T., Hernándes, C. A., Rask-Andersen, M. & Johansson, Å. (2018). Breast-feeding and risk of asthma, hay fever, and eczema [Letter to the editor]. Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, 141(3), 1157-+
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Breast-feeding and risk of asthma, hay fever, and eczema
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2018 (English)In: Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, ISSN 0091-6749, E-ISSN 1097-6825, Vol. 141, no 3, p. 1157-+Article in journal, Letter (Other academic) Published
National Category
Respiratory Medicine and Allergy Immunology in the medical area
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-355831 (URN)10.1016/j.jaci.2017.10.022 (DOI)000426974800046 ()29132959 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-07-06 Created: 2018-07-06 Last updated: 2018-07-06Bibliographically approved
Evangelou, E., Warren, H. R., Mosen-Ansorena, D., Mifsud, B., Pazoki, R., Gao, H., . . . Caulfield, M. J. (2018). Genetic analysis of over 1 million people identifies 535 new loci associated with blood pressure traits.. Nature Genetics, 50(10), 1412-1425
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Genetic analysis of over 1 million people identifies 535 new loci associated with blood pressure traits.
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2018 (English)In: Nature Genetics, ISSN 1061-4036, E-ISSN 1546-1718, Vol. 50, no 10, p. 1412-1425Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

High blood pressure is a highly heritable and modifiable risk factor for cardiovascular disease. We report the largest genetic association study of blood pressure traits (systolic, diastolic and pulse pressure) to date in over 1 million people of European ancestry. We identify 535 novel blood pressure loci that not only offer new biological insights into blood pressure regulation but also highlight shared genetic architecture between blood pressure and lifestyle exposures. Our findings identify new biological pathways for blood pressure regulation with potential for improved cardiovascular disease prevention in the future.

National Category
Medical Genetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-367084 (URN)10.1038/s41588-018-0205-x (DOI)000446047000013 ()30224653 (PubMedID)
Funder
EU, European Research CouncilNovo Nordisk, NNF15CC0018486EU, FP7, Seventh Framework Programme, HEALTH-F2-2013-601456Wellcome trust, RE/13/1/30181Wellcome trust, WT098051
Available from: 2018-11-28 Created: 2018-11-28 Last updated: 2018-12-05Bibliographically approved
Ek, W. E., Rask-Andersen, M., Karlsson, T., Enroth, S., Gyllensten, U. B. & Johansson, Å. (2018). Genetic variants influencing phenotypic variance heterogeneity. Human Molecular Genetics, 27(5), 799-810
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Genetic variants influencing phenotypic variance heterogeneity
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2018 (English)In: Human Molecular Genetics, ISSN 0964-6906, E-ISSN 1460-2083, Vol. 27, no 5, p. 799-810Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Most genetic studies identify genetic variants associated with disease risk or with the mean value of a quantitative trait. More rarely, genetic variants associated with variance heterogeneity are considered. In this study, we have identified such variance single-nucleotide polymorphisms (vSNPs) and examined if these represent biological gene x gene or gene x environment interactions or statistical artifacts caused by multiple linked genetic variants influencing the same phenotype. We have performed a genome-wide study, to identify vSNPs associated with variance heterogeneity in DNA methylation levels. Genotype data from over 10 million single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), and DNA methylation levels at over 430 000 CpG sites, were analyzed in 729 individuals. We identified vSNPs for 7195 CpG sites (P < 9.4 x 10(-11)). This is a relatively low number compared to 52 335 CpG sites for which SNPs were associated with mean DNA methylation levels. We further showed that variance heterogeneity between genotypes mainly represents additional, often rare, SNPs in linkage disequilibrium (LD) with the respective vSNP and for some vSNPs, multiple low frequency variants co-segregating with one of the vSNP alleles. Therefore, our results suggest that variance heterogeneity of DNA methylation mainly represents phenotypic effects by multiple SNPs, rather than biological interactions. Such effects may also be important for interpreting variance heterogeneity of more complex clinical phenotypes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
OXFORD UNIV PRESS, 2018
National Category
Medical Genetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-350890 (URN)10.1093/hmg/ddx441 (DOI)000426838200003 ()29325024 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2011-2354, 2015-03327Göran Gustafsson Foundation for Research in Natural Sciences and MedicineSwedish Society for Medical Research (SSMF)Åke Wiberg Foundation
Available from: 2018-05-28 Created: 2018-05-28 Last updated: 2018-07-06Bibliographically approved
Enroth, S., Maturi, V., Berggrund, M., Bosdotter Enroth, S., Moustakas, A., Johansson, Å. & Gyllensten, U. B. (2018). Systemic and specific effects of antihypertensive and lipid-lowering medication on plasma protein biomarkers for cardiovascular diseases. Scientific Reports, 8, Article ID 5531.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Systemic and specific effects of antihypertensive and lipid-lowering medication on plasma protein biomarkers for cardiovascular diseases
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2018 (English)In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 8, article id 5531Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A large fraction of the adult population is on lifelong medication for cardiovascular disorders, but the metabolic consequences are largely unknown. This study determines the effects of common anti-hypertensive and lipid lowering drugs on circulating plasma protein biomarkers. We studied 425 proteins in plasma together with anthropometric and lifestyle variables, and the genetic profile in a cross-sectional cohort. We found 8406 covariate-protein associations, and a two-stage GWAS identified 17253 SNPs to be associated with 109 proteins. By computationally removing variation due to lifestyle and genetic factors, we could determine that medication, per se, affected the abundance levels of 35.7% of the plasma proteins. Medication either affected a single, a few, or a large number of protein, and were found to have a negative or positive influence on known disease pathways and biomarkers. Anti-hypertensive or lipid lowering drugs affected 33.1% of the proteins. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors showed the strongest lowering effect by decreasing plasma levels of myostatin. Cell-culture experiments showed that angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors reducted myostatin RNA levels. Thus, understanding the effects of lifelong medication on the plasma proteome is important both for sharpening the diagnostic precision of protein biomarkers and in disease management.

National Category
Medical Biotechnology (with a focus on Cell Biology (including Stem Cell Biology), Molecular Biology, Microbiology, Biochemistry or Biopharmacy)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-351628 (URN)10.1038/s41598-018-23860-y (DOI)000428999200067 ()29615742 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Foundation for Strategic Research Swedish National Infrastructure for Computing (SNIC), b2011203; b2014145
Available from: 2018-06-07 Created: 2018-06-07 Last updated: 2018-07-06Bibliographically approved
Ek, W. E., Ahsan, M., Rask-Andersen, M., Liang, L., Moffatt, M. F., Gyllensten, U. & Johansson, Å. (2017). Epigenome-wide DNA methylation study of IgE concentration in relation to self-reported allergies. Epigenomics, 9(4), 407-418
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Epigenome-wide DNA methylation study of IgE concentration in relation to self-reported allergies
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2017 (English)In: Epigenomics, ISSN 1750-1911, Vol. 9, no 4, p. 407-418Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

AIM: Epigenetic mechanisms are critical for normal immune development and epigenetic alterations might therefore be possible contributors to immune diseases. To investigate if DNA methylation in whole blood is associated with total and allergen-specific IgE levels.

METHODS: We performed an epigenome-wide association study to investigate the association between DNA methylation and IgE level, allergen-specific IgE and self-reported immune diseases and allergies in 728 individuals.

RESULTS: We identified and replicated 15 CpG sites associated with IgE, mapping to biologically relevant genes, including ACOT7, ILR5A, KCNH2, PRG2 and EPX. A total of 331 loci were associated with allergen-specific IgE, but none of these CpG sites were associated with self-reported allergies and immune diseases.

CONCLUSION: This study shows that IgE levels are associated with DNA methylation levels at numerous CpG sites, which might provide new leads for investigating the links between IgE and allergic inflammation.

Keywords
DNA methylation, Fx5, IgE, Phadiatop, allergy, immune diseases
National Category
Medical Genetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-318034 (URN)10.2217/epi-2016-0158 (DOI)000399344700006 ()28322575 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Society of Medicine, 2011-2354 K2007-66X-20270-01-3Göran Gustafsson Foundation for promotion of scientific research at Uppala University and Royal Institute of TechnologySwedish Foundation for Strategic Research EU, European Research CouncilScience for Life Laboratory - a national resource center for high-throughput molecular bioscience
Available from: 2017-03-23 Created: 2017-03-23 Last updated: 2018-07-06Bibliographically approved
Rask-Andersen, M., Karlsson, T., Ek, W. E. & Johansson, Å. (2017). Gene-environment interaction study for BMI reveals interactions between genetic factors and physical activity, alcohol consumption and socioeconomic status.. PLoS Genetics, 13(9), Article ID e1006977.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Gene-environment interaction study for BMI reveals interactions between genetic factors and physical activity, alcohol consumption and socioeconomic status.
2017 (English)In: PLoS Genetics, ISSN 1553-7390, E-ISSN 1553-7404, Vol. 13, no 9, article id e1006977Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Previous genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified hundreds of genetic loci to be associated with body mass index (BMI) and risk of obesity. Genetic effects can differ between individuals depending on lifestyle or environmental factors due to gene-environment interactions. In this study, we examine gene-environment interactions in 362,496 unrelated participants with Caucasian ancestry from the UK Biobank resource. A total of 94 BMI-associated SNPs, selected from a previous GWAS on BMI, were used to construct weighted genetic scores for BMI (GSBMI). Linear regression modeling was used to estimate the effect of gene-environment interactions on BMI for 131 lifestyle factors related to: dietary habits, smoking and alcohol consumption, physical activity, socioeconomic status, mental health, sleeping patterns, as well as female-specific factors such as menopause and childbirth. In total, 15 lifestyle factors were observed to interact with GSBMI, of which alcohol intake frequency, usual walking pace, and Townsend deprivation index, a measure of socioeconomic status, were all highly significant (p = 1.45*10-29, p = 3.83*10-26, p = 4.66*10-11, respectively). Interestingly, the frequency of alcohol consumption, rather than the total weekly amount resulted in a significant interaction. The FTO locus was the strongest single locus interacting with any of the lifestyle factors. However, 13 significant interactions were also observed after omitting the FTO locus from the genetic score. Our analyses indicate that many lifestyle factors modify the genetic effects on BMI with some groups of individuals having more than double the effect of the genetic score. However, the underlying causal mechanisms of gene-environmental interactions are difficult to deduce from cross-sectional data alone and controlled experiments are required to fully characterise the causal factors.

National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-332047 (URN)10.1371/journal.pgen.1006977 (DOI)000411976100011 ()28873402 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2015-03327Göran Gustafsson Foundation for Research in Natural Sciences and MedicineSwedish Society for Medical Research (SSMF)Åke Wiberg FoundationSwedish National Infrastructure for Computing (SNIC), b2016021
Available from: 2017-10-23 Created: 2017-10-23 Last updated: 2018-07-06Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-2915-4498

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