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Publications (10 of 99) Show all publications
Ågren, M. (2018). The Family Economy. In: Edward Behrend-Martinez (Ed.), A Cultural History of Marriage in the Age of Enlightenment: . London: Bloomsbury
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Family Economy
2018 (English)In: A Cultural History of Marriage in the Age of Enlightenment / [ed] Edward Behrend-Martinez, London: Bloomsbury , 2018Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Bloomsbury, 2018
Series
A Cultural History of Marriage
National Category
History
Research subject
History
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-348015 (URN)
Funder
Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation
Available from: 2018-04-09 Created: 2018-04-09 Last updated: 2018-04-18Bibliographically approved
Ågren, M. & Lavelle, T. (2018). Translingual Pedagogy and Anglophone Writing Instruction in a Swedish Department of History. In: Translingual Dispositions: . University Press of Colorado
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Translingual Pedagogy and Anglophone Writing Instruction in a Swedish Department of History
2018 (English)In: Translingual Dispositions, University Press of Colorado , 2018Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
University Press of Colorado, 2018
National Category
General Language Studies and Linguistics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-348016 (URN)
Available from: 2018-04-09 Created: 2018-04-09 Last updated: 2018-04-18Bibliographically approved
Lennersand, M., Mispelaere, J., Pihl, C. & Ågren, M. (2017). Gender, Work, and the Fiscal-Military State. In: Maria Ågren (Ed.), Making a Living, Making a Difference: Gender and work in early modern European society. New York: Oxford University Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Gender, Work, and the Fiscal-Military State
2017 (English)In: Making a Living, Making a Difference: Gender and work in early modern European society / [ed] Maria Ågren, New York: Oxford University Press, 2017Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In contrast to the early twentieth century, when marriage could set an end to women’s working lives, early modern society was based on the fundamental necessity of married women’s work. This chapter looks at one part of the labor market where this was particularly salient: state service. The new states of Europe created a market in male labor and new career opportunities for men. States were, however, just as dependent on women’s work, both for their households and directly for the state. Looking at men’s and women’s work in four state-run sectors (the customs administration, the army, large-scale production units, and midwifery), this chapter explores the ways in which state formation, commercialization, and people’s everyday lives were entangled.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York: Oxford University Press, 2017
Keyword
gender, work, state formation, fiscal-military state, life guard, customs official, wetnurse, royal demesne, ironworks
National Category
History
Research subject
History
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-293120 (URN)10.1093/acprof:oso/9780190240615.003.0008 (DOI)9780190240615 (ISBN)
Funder
Knut and Alice Wallenberg FoundationSwedish Research Council
Available from: 2016-05-12 Created: 2016-05-12 Last updated: 2017-10-27Bibliographically approved
Lindström, J., Hassan Jansson, K., Fiebranz, R., Jacobsson, B. & Ågren, M. (2017). Mistress or maid: The structure of women’s work in Sweden, 1550–1800. Continuity and Change, 32(2), 225-252
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mistress or maid: The structure of women’s work in Sweden, 1550–1800
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2017 (English)In: Continuity and Change, ISSN 0268-4160, E-ISSN 1469-218X, Vol. 32, no 2, p. 225-252Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Based on the verb-oriented method and a unique collection of observations from court records, this article shows that both men and women did almost all categories of work in early modern Sweden. On the level of concrete tasks, however, there was both difference and similarity between the genders. Marital status exerted a strong influence on women’s sustenance activities, creating a clear distinction between unmarried and ever-married. These patterns were probably the effect of a labour legislation that forced young people without independent means to offer their bodies and time to masters and mistresses.

Keyword
gender, work, marital status, verb-oriented method
National Category
History
Research subject
History
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-314990 (URN)10.1017/S0268416017000200 (DOI)000405611200004 ()
Projects
Gender and Work
Funder
Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation
Available from: 2017-02-07 Created: 2017-02-07 Last updated: 2017-11-20Bibliographically approved
Ågren, M. (2015). Royal police ordinances in early modern Sweden: The Emergence of Voluntaristic Understanding of Law, by Toomas Kotkas [Review]. English Historical Review, 130(547), 1544-1546
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Royal police ordinances in early modern Sweden: The Emergence of Voluntaristic Understanding of Law, by Toomas Kotkas
2015 (English)In: English Historical Review, ISSN 0013-8266, E-ISSN 1477-4534, Vol. 130, no 547, p. 1544-1546Article, book review (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford: , 2015
National Category
History
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-240943 (URN)10.1093/ehr/cev315 (DOI)000369221100024 ()
Available from: 2015-01-08 Created: 2015-01-08 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Ågren, M. (2014). Another process of state formation: Swedish customs officials, their work and households. Cultural and social history, 11(1), 31-49
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Another process of state formation: Swedish customs officials, their work and households
2014 (English)In: Cultural and social history, ISSN 1478-0038, E-ISSN 1478-0046, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 31-49Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article discusses why legitimacy remained a problem for the eighteenth-century Swedish state administration. Using the case of customs officials in the town of Orebro, the article shows that complaints from citizens about the behaviour of these men were rife. While not impartial, such complaints nevertheless highlight the problematic situation of lower state employees: they often lacked local networks and were poorly educated and badly paid. They were also subject to unrealistic expectations to carry out tasks in many places at the same time. This made it necessary for them to harness the human resources of the entire household. The author argues that while it is true that, in the long run, bureaucratization entailed a specialization and masculinization of state administration, in the shorter term the role of women, and particularly wives, probably increased.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Berg Publishers, 2014
National Category
History
Research subject
History
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-202152 (URN)10.2752/147800414X13802176314447 (DOI)000331499800002 ()
Projects
Gender and work in early modern Sweden
Funder
Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation
Available from: 2013-06-20 Created: 2013-06-20 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Ågren, M. (2014). Emissaries, allies, accomplices and enemies: Married women's work in eighteenth-century urban Sweden. Urban History, 41(3), 394-414
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Emissaries, allies, accomplices and enemies: Married women's work in eighteenth-century urban Sweden
2014 (English)In: Urban History, ISSN 0963-9268, E-ISSN 1469-8706, Vol. 41, no 3, p. 394-414Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2014
National Category
History
Research subject
History
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-202150 (URN)10.1017/S0963926813000618 (DOI)000338101300002 ()
Projects
Gender and Work in early modern Sweden
Funder
Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation
Available from: 2013-06-20 Created: 2013-06-20 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Ågren, M. (2014). Labors Lost: Women's Work and the Early Modern English Stage [Review]. Historisk Tidskrift (S), 134(2), 307-310
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Labors Lost: Women's Work and the Early Modern English Stage
2014 (English)In: Historisk Tidskrift (S), ISSN 0345-469X, Vol. 134, no 2, p. 307-310Article, book review (Other academic) Published
National Category
History
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-228613 (URN)000337200100016 ()
Available from: 2014-07-18 Created: 2014-07-17 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Ågren, M. (2014). Tidigmoderna missförstånd?. In: Peter Ericsson et al (Ed.), Staten...: vänbok till .... Uppsala: Uppsala universitet
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Tidigmoderna missförstånd?
2014 (Swedish)In: Staten...: vänbok till ... / [ed] Peter Ericsson et al, Uppsala: Uppsala universitet, 2014Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Uppsala: Uppsala universitet, 2014
Series
Studia historica Upsaliensia, ISSN 0081-6531
National Category
History
Research subject
History
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-202153 (URN)
Projects
Gender and work in early modern Sweden
Funder
Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation
Available from: 2013-06-20 Created: 2013-06-20 Last updated: 2013-11-04Bibliographically approved
Pihl, C. & Ågren, M. (2014). Vad var en hustru? Ett begreppshistoriskt bidrag till genushistorien: [What's in a word? The history of the Swedish female title hustru]. Historisk Tidskrift (S), 134(2), 170-190
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Vad var en hustru? Ett begreppshistoriskt bidrag till genushistorien: [What's in a word? The history of the Swedish female title hustru]
2014 (English)In: Historisk Tidskrift (S), ISSN 0345-469X, Vol. 134, no 2, p. 170-190Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In Swedish medieval and early modern sources, women were often referred to as hustrur (plur.). The word still exists and its meaning is "a married woman". The widespread use of the title has been taken to indicate that women were routinely described in relation to their husbands, which allegedly bears witness to their subordinated position in medieval and early modern society. As this article shows, however, hustru had several interlinked meanings in the past. It was not an unequivocal descriptor of marital status since both married and widowed women were referred to as hustrur Nor was it necessarily a descriptor of marital status. Hustru could refer to a woman's capacity to assume responsibility and to govern. While this has been noticed in Svenska Akademiens ordbok, the standard Swedish dictionary, the quantitative importance of this usage has not been emphasized in the historiography. Thanks to the Gender and Work database, it can be demonstrated that the meaning of hustru as "woman who governs" was probably the predominant one in sources describing women's and men's work in medieval and early modern Sweden. This conclusion confirms results presented for the German-speaking area (Wiesner 1998), Portugal (Abreu Ferreira 2002) and England (Erickson 2013): titles corresponding to Swedish hustru did not only (and sometimes not at all) refer to a woman's status as married. In view of the distinction made in law between married women (who were under marital guardianship) and widows (who enjoyed the same rights as men), the ways in which hustru was used may seem puzzling. If a widow was considered to have a higher status than a married woman, we would expect a clear linguistic distinction between widowed and married women. But this was not the case. Widowed women were often described as hustrur, such as in the case of "hustru Anna Svensdotter, widow of Bengt Larsson". In this and numerous other cases, hustru clearly did not mean a married woman. Instead the example should be understood to mean "Anna Svensdotter, who is an adult woman capable of governing a household and who is also the widow of Bengt Larsson". In contexts such as this, the word hustru did not signal a relationship to a man but, rather, the capacity to assume responsibility. This argument is further supported by the work of Jacobsen (1995) and Andersson Raeder (2011). With time, however, hustru lost the meaning of "woman who governs". Only the meaning "married woman" remained. Only after this shift does it make sense to see hustru as a word signalling a woman's relationship to a man.

Keyword
Sweden, early modern, conceptual history, gender history, database, female titles, women's work, marital status
National Category
History
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-228569 (URN)000337200100003 ()
Available from: 2014-07-16 Created: 2014-07-16 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-7603-291x

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