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Svenson, Marie
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Publications (7 of 7) Show all publications
Carlsbecker, A., Sundstrom, J. F., Englund, M., Uddenberg, D., Izquierdo, L., Kvarnheden, A., . . . Engström, P. (2013). Molecular control of normal and acrocona mutant seed cone development in Norway spruce (Picea abies) and the evolution of conifer ovule-bearing organs. New Phytologist, 200(1), 261-275
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Molecular control of normal and acrocona mutant seed cone development in Norway spruce (Picea abies) and the evolution of conifer ovule-bearing organs
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2013 (English)In: New Phytologist, ISSN 0028-646X, E-ISSN 1469-8137, Vol. 200, no 1, p. 261-275Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Reproductive organs in seed plants are morphologically divergent and their evolutionary history is often unclear. The mechanisms controlling their development have been extensively studied in angiosperms but are poorly understood in conifers and other gymnosperms. Here, we address the molecular control of seed cone development in Norway spruce, Picea abies. We present expression analyses of five novel MADS-box genes in comparison with previously identified MADS and LEAFY genes at distinct developmental stages. In addition, we have characterized the homeotic transformation from vegetative shoot to female cone and associated changes in regulatory gene expression patterns occurring in the acrocona mutant. The analyses identified genes active at the onset of ovuliferous and ovule development and identified expression patterns marking distinct domains of the ovuliferous scale. The reproductive transformation in acrocona involves the activation of all tested genes normally active in early cone development, except for an AGAMOUS-LIKE6/SEPALLATA (AGL6/SEP) homologue. This absence may be functionally associated with the nondeterminate development of the acrocona ovule-bearing scales. Our morphological and gene expression analyses give support to the hypothesis that the modern cone is a complex structure, and the ovuliferous scale the result of reductions and compactions of an ovule-bearing axillary short shoot in cones of Paleozoic conifers.

Keywords
conifer reproductive development, LEAFY genes, MADS-box genes, ovule, ovuliferous scale, Picea abies var. acrocona
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-207488 (URN)10.1111/nph.12360 (DOI)000323475000027 ()
Available from: 2013-09-17 Created: 2013-09-16 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Englund, M., Carlsbecker, A., Engström, P. & Vergara-Silva, F. (2011). Morphological "primary homology" and expression of AG -subfamily MADS-box genes in pines, podocarps, and yews. Evolution & Development, 13(2), 171-181
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Morphological "primary homology" and expression of AG -subfamily MADS-box genes in pines, podocarps, and yews
2011 (English)In: Evolution & Development, ISSN 1520-541X, E-ISSN 1525-142X, Vol. 13, no 2, p. 171-181Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The morphological variation among reproductive organs of extant gymnosperms is remarkable, especially among conifers. Several hypotheses concerning morphological homology between various conifer reproductive organs have been put forward, in particular in relation to the pine ovuliferous scale. Here, we use the expression patterns of orthologs of the ABC-model MADS-box gene AGAMOUS (AG) for testing morphological homology hypotheses related to organs of the conifer female cone. To this end, we first developed a tailored 3'RACE procedure that allows reliable amplification of partial sequences highly similar to gymnosperm-derived members of the AG-subfamily of MADS-box genes. Expression patterns of two novel conifer AG orthologs cloned with this procedure-namely PodAG and TgAG, obtained from the podocarp Podocarpus reichei and the yew Taxus globosa, respectively-are then further characterized in the morphologically divergent female cones of these species. The expression patterns of PodAG and TgAG are compared with those of DAL2, a previously discovered Picea abies (Pinaceae) AG ortholog. By treating the expression patterns of DAL2, PodAG, and TgAG as character states mapped onto currently accepted cladogram topologies, we suggest that the epimatium-that is, the podocarp female cone organ previously postulated as a "modified" ovuliferous scale-and the canonical Pinaceae ovuliferous scale can be legitimally conceptualized as "primary homologs." Character state mapping for TgAG suggests in turn that the aril of Taxaceae should be considered as a different type of organ. This work demonstrates how the interaction between developmental-genetic data and formal cladistic theory could fruitfully contribute to gymnosperm systematics.

National Category
Biological Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-287515 (URN)
Available from: 2016-04-25 Created: 2016-04-25 Last updated: 2017-11-30
Englund, M., Carlsbecker, A., Engström, P. & Vergara-Silva, F. (2011). Morphological "primary homology" and expression of AG -subfamily MADS-box genes in pines, podocarps, and yews. Evolution & Development, 13(2), 171-181
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Morphological "primary homology" and expression of AG -subfamily MADS-box genes in pines, podocarps, and yews
2011 (English)In: Evolution & Development, ISSN 1520-541X, E-ISSN 1525-142X, Vol. 13, no 2, p. 171-181Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The morphological variation among reproductive organs of extant gymnosperms is remarkable, especially among conifers. Several hypotheses concerning morphological homology between various conifer reproductive organs have been put forward, in particular in relation to the pine ovuliferous scale. Here, we use the expression patterns of orthologs of the ABC-model MADS-box gene AGAMOUS (AG) for testing morphological homology hypotheses related to organs of the conifer female cone. To this end, we first developed a tailored 3'RACE procedure that allows reliable amplification of partial sequences highly similar to gymnosperm-derived members of the AG-subfamily of MADS-box genes. Expression patterns of two novel conifer AG orthologs cloned with this procedure-namely PodAG and TgAG, obtained from the podocarp Podocarpus reichei and the yew Taxus globosa, respectively-are then further characterized in the morphologically divergent female cones of these species. The expression patterns of PodAG and TgAG are compared with those of DAL2, a previously discovered Picea abies (Pinaceae) AG ortholog. By treating the expression patterns of DAL2, PodAG, and TgAG as character states mapped onto currently accepted cladogram topologies, we suggest that the epimatium-that is, the podocarp female cone organ previously postulated as a "modified" ovuliferous scale-and the canonical Pinaceae ovuliferous scale can be legitimally conceptualized as "primary homologs." Character state mapping for TgAG suggests in turn that the aril of Taxaceae should be considered as a different type of organ. This work demonstrates how the interaction between developmental-genetic data and formal cladistic theory could fruitfully contribute to gymnosperm systematics.

National Category
Biological Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-151759 (URN)10.1111/j.1525-142X.2011.00467.x (DOI)000288502600006 ()21410873 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2011-04-18 Created: 2011-04-18 Last updated: 2017-12-11Bibliographically approved
Álvarez-Buylla, E. R., Ambrose, B. A., Flores-Sandoval, E., Vergara-Silva, F., Englund, M., Garay-Arroyo, A., . . . Meyerowitz, E. M. (2010). B-Function Expression in the Flower Center Underlies the Homeotic Phenotype of Lacandonia schismatica (Triuridaceae). The Plant Cell, 22(11), 3543-3559
Open this publication in new window or tab >>B-Function Expression in the Flower Center Underlies the Homeotic Phenotype of Lacandonia schismatica (Triuridaceae)
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2010 (English)In: The Plant Cell, ISSN 1040-4651, E-ISSN 1532-298X, Vol. 22, no 11, p. 3543-3559Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Spontaneous homeotic transformations have been described in natural populations of both plants and animals, but little is known about the molecular-genetic mechanisms underlying these processes in plants. In the ABC model of floral organ identity in Arabidopsis thaliana, the B- and C-functions are necessary for stamen morphogenesis, and C alone is required for carpel identity. We provide ABC model-based molecular-genetic evidence that explains the unique inside-out homeotic floral organ arrangement of the monocotyledonous mycoheterotroph species Lacandonia schismatica (Triuridaceae) from Mexico. Whereas a quarter million flowering plant species bear central carpels surrounded by stamens, L. schismatica stamens occur in the center of the flower and are surrounded by carpels. The simplest explanation for this is that the B-function is displaced toward the flower center. Our analyses of the spatio-temporal pattern of B- and C-function gene expression are consistent with this hypothesis. The hypothesis is further supported by conservation between the B-function genes of L. schismatica and Arabidopsis, as the former are able to rescue stamens in Arabidopsis transgenic complementation lines, and Ls-AP3 and Ls-PI are able to interact with each other and with the corresponding Arabidopsis B-function proteins in yeast. Thus, relatively simple molecular modifications may underlie important morphological shifts in natural populations of extant plant taxa.

National Category
Biological Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-136640 (URN)10.1105/tpc.109.069153 (DOI)000285576500005 ()21119062 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2010-12-14 Created: 2010-12-14 Last updated: 2017-12-11Bibliographically approved
Carlsbecker, A., Tandre, K., Johansson, U., Englund, M. & Engström, P. (2004). The MADS-box gene DAL1 is a potential mediator of the juvenile-to-adult transition in Norway spruce (Picea abies). The Plant Journal, 40, 546-557
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The MADS-box gene DAL1 is a potential mediator of the juvenile-to-adult transition in Norway spruce (Picea abies)
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2004 (English)In: The Plant Journal, Vol. 40, p. 546-557Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Progression through the plant life cycle involves changes in many essential features, most notably in the capacity to reproduce. The transition from juvenile vegetative and non-reproductive to an adult reproductive phase is gradual and can take many years; in the conifer Norway spruce, Picea abiea, typically 20-25 years. We present a detailed analysis of the activities of three regulatory genes with potential roles in the transition in Norway spruce: DAL1, a MADS-box gene related to the AGL6 group of genes from angiosperms, and the two LEAFY-related genes PaLFY and PaNLY. DAL1 activity is initiated in the shoots of juvenile trees at an age of 3-5 years, and then increases with age, whereas both LFY genes are active throughout the juvenile phase. The activity of DAL1 further shows a spatial pattern along the stem of the tree that parallels a similar gradient in physiolpoical and morphological features associated with maturation to the adult phase. Constitutive expression of DAL1 in transgenic Arabidopsis plants caused a dramatic attenuation of both juvenile and adult growth phases;flowers forming immediately after the embryogenic phase of development in severely affected plants. Taken together, our resulsts support the notion that DAL1 may have a regulatory role in the juvenile-to-adult transition in Norway spruce.

Keywords
conifer, development, reproduction, MADS transcription factor, LEAFY, NEEDLY
National Category
Botany Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Microbiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-287514 (URN)
Available from: 2016-04-25 Created: 2016-04-25 Last updated: 2016-04-25
Carlsbecker, A., Sundström, J., Tandre, K., Englund, M., Kvarnheden, A., Johansson, U. & Engström, P. (2003). The DAL10 gene from Norway spruce (Picea abies) belongs to a potentially gymnosperm-specific subclass of MADS-box genes and is specifically active in seed cones and pollen cones.. Evolution & Development, 5(6), 551-561
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The DAL10 gene from Norway spruce (Picea abies) belongs to a potentially gymnosperm-specific subclass of MADS-box genes and is specifically active in seed cones and pollen cones.
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2003 (English)In: Evolution & Development, Vol. 5, no 6, p. 551-561Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Blackwell publishing, INC, 2003
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-287513 (URN)
Available from: 2016-04-25 Created: 2016-04-25 Last updated: 2016-04-25
Sundström, J., Carlsbecker, A., Svensson, M. E., Svenson, M., Johanson, U. & Engström, P. (1999). MADS-box genes active in developing pollen cones of Norway spruce (Picea abies) are homologous to the B-class floral homeotic genes in angiosperms. Developmental Genetics, 25(3), 253-266
Open this publication in new window or tab >>MADS-box genes active in developing pollen cones of Norway spruce (Picea abies) are homologous to the B-class floral homeotic genes in angiosperms
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1999 (English)In: Developmental Genetics, ISSN 0192-253X, E-ISSN 1520-6408, Vol. 25, no 3, p. 253-266Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The reproductive organs of conifers, the pollen cones and seed cones, differ in morphology from the angiosperm flower in several fundamental respects. In this report we present evidence to suggest that the two plant groups, in spite of these morphological differences and the long evolutionary distance between them, share important features in regulating the development of the reproductive organs. We present the cloning of three genes, DAL11, DAL12, and DAL13, from Norway spruce, all of which are related to the angiosperm B-class of homeotic genes. The B-class genes determine the identities of petals and stamens. They are members of a family of MADS-box genes, which also includes C-class genes that act to determine the identity of carpels and, in concert with B genes specify stamens in the angiosperm flower. Phylogenetic analyses and the presence of B-class specific C-terminal motifs in the DAL protein sequences imply homology to the B-class genes. Specific expression of all three genes in developing pollen cones suggests that the genes are involved in one aspect of B function, the regulation of development of the pollen-bearing organs. The different temporal and spatial expression patterns of the three DAL genes in the developing pollen cones indicate that the genes have attained at least in part distinct functions. The DAL11, DAL12, and 13 expression patterns in the pollen cone partly overlap with that of the previously identified DAL2 gene, which is structurally and functionally related to the angiosperm C-class genes. This result supports the hypothesis that an interaction between B- and C-type genes is required for male organ development in conifers like in the angiosperms. Taken together, our data suggests that central components in the regulatory mechanisms for reproductive organ development are conserved between conifers and angiosperms and, thus, among all seed plants.

National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-89833 (URN)10.1002/(SICI)1520-6408(1999)25:3<253::AID-DVG8>3.0.CO;2-P (DOI)10528266 (PubMedID)
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Available from: 2002-04-29 Created: 2002-04-29 Last updated: 2017-12-14Bibliographically approved
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