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BETA
Westling, Bengt E
Alternative names
Publications (8 of 8) Show all publications
Westling, B. E. (2012). Oxfordtraditionens tio viktigaste bidrag till KBT. Paper presented at KBT-dagarna 2012.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Oxfordtraditionens tio viktigaste bidrag till KBT
2012 (Swedish)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other academic)
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-191812 (URN)
Conference
KBT-dagarna 2012
Available from: 2013-01-14 Created: 2013-01-14
Carlbring, P., Maurin, T., Sjömark, J., Maurin, L., Westling, B. E., Ekselius, L., . . . Andersson, G. (2011). All at once or one at a  time? A randomized controlled trial comparing two ways to deliver bibliotherapy for panic disorder [Letter to the editor]. Cognitive Behaviour Therapy, 40(3), 228-235
Open this publication in new window or tab >>All at once or one at a  time? A randomized controlled trial comparing two ways to deliver bibliotherapy for panic disorder
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2011 (English)In: Cognitive Behaviour Therapy, ISSN 1650-6073, E-ISSN 1651-2316, Vol. 40, no 3, p. 228-235Article in journal, Letter (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge: , 2011
National Category
Social Sciences
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-191809 (URN)10.1080/16506073.2011.553629 (DOI)
Available from: 2013-01-14 Created: 2013-01-14 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Carlbring, P., Bohman, S., Brunt, S., Buhrman, M., Westling, B. E., Ekselius, L. & Andersson, G. (2006). Remote treatment of panic disorder: A randomized trial of internet-based cognitive behavior therapy supplemented with telephone calls. American Journal of Psychiatry, 163(12), 2119-2125
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Remote treatment of panic disorder: A randomized trial of internet-based cognitive behavior therapy supplemented with telephone calls
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2006 (English)In: American Journal of Psychiatry, ISSN 0002-953X, E-ISSN 1535-7228, Vol. 163, no 12, p. 2119-2125Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: This study evaluated a 10-week Internet-based bibliotherapy self-help program with short weekly telephone calls for people suffering from panic disorder with or without agoraphobia. Method: After the authors confirmed the diagnosis by administering the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV by telephone, 60 participants were randomly assigned to either a wait-listed control group or a multimodal treatment package based on cognitive behavior therapy plus minimal therapist contact via e-mail. A 10-minute telephone call was made each week to support each participant. Total mean time spent on each participant during the 10 weeks was 3.9 hours. The participants were required to send in homework assignments before receiving the next treatment module. Results: Analyses were conducted on an intention-to-treat basis, which included all randomly assigned participants. From pretreatment to posttreatment, all treated participants improved significantly on all measured dimensions (bodily interpretations, maladaptive cognitions, avoidance, general anxiety and depression levels, and quality of life). Treatment gains on self-report measures were maintained at the 9-month follow-up. A blind telephone interview after the end of treatment revealed that 77% of the treated patients no longer fulfilled the criteria for panic disorder, whereas all of the wait-listed subjects still suffered from it. Conclusions: This study provides evidence to support the use of treatment distributed via the Internet with the addition of short weekly telephone calls to treat panic disorder. Replication should be made to compare self-help and telephone treatment based on cognitive behavior methods with nonspecific interventions.

National Category
Psychiatry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-22269 (URN)10.1176/appi.ajp.163.12.2119 (DOI)000242626000018 ()17151163 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2008-04-01 Created: 2008-04-01 Last updated: 2017-12-07
Tillfors, M., Carlbring, P., Furmark, T., Lewenhaupt, S., Eriksson, A., Spak, M., . . . Andersson, G. (2006). University students with social phobia and public speaking fears: A randomized trial of Internet delivered self-help with or without live group exposure.. In: Second international meeting of the International Society for Research on Internet Interventions, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm (28-29 April).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>University students with social phobia and public speaking fears: A randomized trial of Internet delivered self-help with or without live group exposure.
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2006 (English)In: Second international meeting of the International Society for Research on Internet Interventions, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm (28-29 April), 2006Conference paper, Published paper (Other (popular scientific, debate etc.))
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-19949 (URN)
Available from: 2006-12-04 Created: 2006-12-04
Carlbring, P., Westling, B., Ljungstrand, P., Ekselius, L. & Andersson, G. (2002). Treatment of panic disorder via the Internet: two randomized trials. European Psychiatry, 17(Suppl. 1), 165
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Treatment of panic disorder via the Internet: two randomized trials
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2002 (English)In: European Psychiatry, Vol. 17, no Suppl. 1, p. 165-Article in journal (Other scientific) Published
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-41281 (URN)
Available from: 2008-04-01 Created: 2008-04-01 Last updated: 2011-01-13
Carlbring, P., Westling, B. E., Ljungstrand, P., Ekselius, L. & Andersson, G. (2001). Treatment of panic disorder via the Internet: A randomized trial of a self-help program. Behavior Therapy, 32(4), 751-764
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Treatment of panic disorder via the Internet: A randomized trial of a self-help program
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2001 (English)In: Behavior Therapy, ISSN 0005-7894, E-ISSN 1878-1888, Vol. 32, no 4, p. 751-764Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This controlled study, evaluated an Internet-delivered self-help program plus minimal therapist contact via e-mail for people suffering front panic disorder. Out of the 500 individuals screened using the self-administered diagnostic instrument Composite International Diagnostic Interview in shortened form (World Health Organization, 1999), 41 fulfilled the inclusion criteria. These participants were randomized to either treatment via the Internet or to a waiting-list control. The main components of the treatment were psychoeducation. breathing retraining, cognitive restructuring, interoceptive exposure. in vivo exposure, and relapse prevention. From pre- to post- test self-help, participants improved significantly more on almost all dimensions. The results from this experiment generally provide evidence for the continued use and development of self-help programs for panic disorder distributed via the Internet.

National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-91569 (URN)10.1016/S0005-7894(01)80019-8 (DOI)000175072600009 ()
Available from: 2004-04-13 Created: 2004-04-13 Last updated: 2017-12-14Bibliographically approved
Carlbring, P., Westling, B. E. & Andersson, G. (2000). A review of published self-help books for panic disorder. Scandinavian Journal of Behaviour Therapy, 29(1), 5-13
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A review of published self-help books for panic disorder
2000 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Behaviour Therapy, ISSN 0284-5717, Vol. 29, no 1, p. 5-13Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This brief review of 14 self-help books on panic disorder compares: target group, treatment time, included components, existence of structured exercises, and whether or not daily record-keeping is encouraged. Six of the books cover all components deemed necessary for a multimodal cognitive-behavioral treatment package, and five of these are recommended. The reviews are followed by a brief summary of published bibliotherapy studies in which a selection of the books has been used. The results of these studies suggest that bibliotherapy is effective, with an effect size ranging from d = 0.5 to d = 1.5.

Keywords
anxiety disorder, bibliotherapy, effect size
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-40035 (URN)10.1080/028457100439827 (DOI)
Available from: 2007-08-21 Created: 2007-08-21 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Öst, L.-G. & Westling, B. E. (1995). Appied relaxation vs cognitive behavior therapy in the treatment of panic disorder. Behaviour Research and Therapy, 33(2), 145-158
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Appied relaxation vs cognitive behavior therapy in the treatment of panic disorder
1995 (English)In: Behaviour Research and Therapy, ISSN 0005-7967, E-ISSN 1873-622X, Vol. 33, no 2, p. 145-158Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The present study investigated the efficacy of a coping-technique, applied relaxation (AR) and cognitive behavior therapy (CBT), in the treatment of panic disorder. Thirty-eight outpatients fulfilling the DSM-III-R criteria for panic disorder with no (n = 30) or mild (n = 8) avoidance were assessed with independent assessor ratings, self-report scales and self-observation of panic attacks before and after treatment, and at a 1-yr follow-up. The patients were treated individually for 12 weekly sessions. The results showed that both treatments yielded very large improvements, which were maintained, or furthered at follow-up. There was no difference between AR and CBT on any measure. The proportion of panic-free patients were 65 and 74% at post-treatment, and 82 and 89% at follow-up, for AR and CBT, respectively. There were no relapses at follow-up, on the contrary 55% of the patients who still had panic attacks at post-treatment were panic-free at follow-up. Besides affecting panic attacks the treatments also yielded marked and lasting changes on generalized anxiety, depression and cognitive misinterpretations. The conclusion that can be drawn is that both AR and CBT are effective treatments for panic disorder without avoidance.

National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-66517 (URN)10.1016/0005-7967(94)E0026-F (DOI)
Available from: 2008-10-17 Created: 2008-10-17 Last updated: 2017-11-28Bibliographically approved
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