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Waara, Johan
Publications (5 of 5) Show all publications
Andersson, G., Waara, J., Jonsson, U., Malmaeus, F., Carlbring, P. & Ost, L.-G. (2013). Internet-Based Exposure Treatment Versus One-Session Exposure Treatment of Snake Phobia: A Randomized Controlled Trial. Cognitive Behaviour Therapy, 42(4), 284-291
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Internet-Based Exposure Treatment Versus One-Session Exposure Treatment of Snake Phobia: A Randomized Controlled Trial
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2013 (English)In: Cognitive Behaviour Therapy, ISSN 1650-6073, E-ISSN 1651-2316, Vol. 42, no 4, p. 284-291Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this study, the authors compared guided Internet-delivered self-help with one-session exposure treatment (OST) in a sample of snake phobic patients. A total of 30 patients were included following a screening on the Internet and a structured clinical interview. The Internet treatment consisted of four weekly text modules which were presented on a web page, a video in which exposure was modelled, and support provided via Internet. The OST was delivered in a three-hour session following a brief orientation session. The main outcome was the behavioural approach test (BAT), and as secondary measures questionnaires measuring anxiety symptoms and depression were used. Results showed that the groups did not differ at post-treatment or follow-up, with the exception of a significant interaction for the BAT in favour of the OST. At post-treatment, 61.5% of the Internet group and 84.6% of the OST group achieved a clinically significant improvement on the BAT. At follow-up, the corresponding figures were 90% for the Internet group and 100% for the OST group (completer sample). Within-group effect sizes for the Snake Phobia Questionnaire were large (d=1.63 and d=2.31 for the Internet and OST groups, respectively, at post-treatment). It is concluded that guided Internet-delivered exposure treatment is a potential treatment option in the treatment of snake phobia, but that OST probably is better.

Keywords
snake phobia, Internet treatment, one-session exposure treatment
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-219160 (URN)10.1080/16506073.2013.844202 (DOI)000329983400005 ()
Available from: 2014-02-27 Created: 2014-02-24 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Andersson, G., Waara, J., Jonsson, U., Malmaeus, F., Carlbring, P. & Öst, L.-G. (2009). Internet-Based Self-Help Versus One-Session Exposure in the Treatment of Spider Phobia: A Randomized Controlled Trial. Cognitive Behaviour Therapy, 38(2), 114-120
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Internet-Based Self-Help Versus One-Session Exposure in the Treatment of Spider Phobia: A Randomized Controlled Trial
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2009 (English)In: Cognitive Behaviour Therapy, ISSN 1650-6073, E-ISSN 1651-2316, Vol. 38, no 2, p. 114-120Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The authors compared guided Internet-delivered self-help with one session of live-exposure treatment in a sample of spider-phobic patients. A total of 30 patients were included following screening on the Internet and a structured clinical interview. The Internet treatment consisted of five weekly text modules, which were presented on a web page, a video in which exposure was modelled, and support provided via Internet. The live-exposure treatment was delivered in a 3-hr session following a brief orientation session. The main outcome measure was the behavioural approach test (BAT), and as secondary measures the authors used questionnaires measuring anxiety symptoms and depression. Results showed that the groups did not differ at posttreatment or follow-up, with the exception of the proportion showing clinically significant change on the BAT. At posttreatment 46.2% of the Internet group and 85.7% in the live-exposure group achieved this change. At follow-up the corresponding figures were 66.7% for the Internet group and 72.7% for the live treatment. Within-group effect sizes for the spider phobia questionnaire were large (d = 1.84 and 2.58 for the Internet and live-exposure groups, respectively, at posttreatment). The authors conclude that guided Internet-delivered exposure treatment is a promising new approach in the treatment of spider phobia.

Keywords
spider phobia, internet treatment one-session exposure treatment
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-221892 (URN)10.1080/16506070902931326 (DOI)
Available from: 2014-04-07 Created: 2014-04-07 Last updated: 2017-12-05
Andersson, G., Bergström, J., Buhrman, M., Carlbring, P., Holländare, F., Kaldo, V., . . . Waara, J. (2008). Development of a new approach to guided self-help via the Internet: The Swedish experience. Journal of technology in human services, 26, 161-181
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Development of a new approach to guided self-help via the Internet: The Swedish experience
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2008 (English)In: Journal of technology in human services, ISSN 1522-8835, E-ISSN 1522-8991, Vol. 26, p. 161-181Article in journal (Refereed) Published
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-221894 (URN)
Available from: 2014-04-07 Created: 2014-04-07 Last updated: 2017-12-05
Carlbring, P., Björnstjerna, E., Bergström, A. F., Waara, J. & Andersson, G. (2007). Applied relaxation: an experimental analogue study of therapist vs. computer administration. Computers in human behavior, 23(1), 2-10
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Applied relaxation: an experimental analogue study of therapist vs. computer administration
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2007 (English)In: Computers in human behavior, ISSN 0747-5632, E-ISSN 1873-7692, Vol. 23, no 1, p. 2-10Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This experimental analog component study compared two ways of administrating relaxation, either via a computer or by a therapist. The second phase of applied relaxation was used, which is called "release-only relaxation". Sixty participants from a student population were randomized to one of three groups: computer-administered relaxation, therapist-administered relaxation, or a control group in which participants surfed on the Internet. Outcome was measures using psycho-physiological responses and self-report. Objective psychophysiological data and results on the subjective visual analogue scale suggest that there was no difference between the two forms of administration. Both experimental groups became significantly more relaxed than the control group that surfed on the Internet. Practical applications and future directions are discussed.

Keywords
applied relaxation, computer administration, Internet, psychophysiology
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-154217 (URN)10.1016/j.chb.2004.03.032 (DOI)000241318000001 ()
Available from: 2011-05-27 Created: 2011-05-27 Last updated: 2017-12-11Bibliographically approved
Carlbring, P., Nilsson-Ihrfelt, E., Waara, J., Kollenstam, C., Buhrman, M., Kaldo, V., . . . Andersson, G. (2005). Treatment of Panic Disorder: Live Therapy vs. Self-Help via Internet. Behaviour Research and Therapy, 43(10), 1321-1333
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Treatment of Panic Disorder: Live Therapy vs. Self-Help via Internet
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2005 (English)In: Behaviour Research and Therapy, ISSN 0005-7967, E-ISSN 1873-622X, Vol. 43, no 10, p. 1321-1333Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A randomized trial was conducted comparing 10 individual weekly sessions of cognitive behaviour therapy for panic disorder (PD) with or without agoraphobia with a 10-module self-help program on the Internet. After confirming the PD diagnosis with an in-person structured clinical interview (SCID) 49 participants were randomized. Overall, the results suggest that Internet-administered self-help plus minimal therapist contact via e-mail can be equally effective as traditional individual cognitive behaviour therapy. Composite within-group effect sizes were high in both groups, while the between-group effect size was small (Cohen's d=16). One-year follow-up confirmed the results, with a within-group effect size of Cohen's d=0.80 for the Internet group and d=0.93 for the live group. The results from this study generally provide evidence to support the continued use and development of Internet-distributed self-help programs.

Keywords
Internet, Panic disorder, Self-help techniques, Bibliotherapy
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-91571 (URN)10.1016/j.brat.2004.10.002 (DOI)
Available from: 2004-04-13 Created: 2004-04-13 Last updated: 2017-12-14
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