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Titova, O. E., Lindberg, E., Tan, X., Elmståhl, S., Lind, L., Schiöth, H. B. & Benedict, C. (2020). Association between sleep duration and executive function differs between diabetic and non-diabetic middle-aged and older adults.. Psychoneuroendocrinology, 111, Article ID 104472.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Association between sleep duration and executive function differs between diabetic and non-diabetic middle-aged and older adults.
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2020 (English)In: Psychoneuroendocrinology, ISSN 0306-4530, E-ISSN 1873-3360, Vol. 111, article id 104472Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Executive function is defined as a set of cognitive skills that are necessary to plan, monitor, and execute a sequence of goal-directed complex actions. Executive function is influenced by a variety of factors, including habitual sleep duration and diabetes. In the present study, we investigated in 18,769 Swedish adults (mean age: 61 y) the association between executive function, diabetes, and self-reported sleep duration. We observed a significant interaction between diabetes and sleep duration for the Trail Making Test (TMT) ratio (P < 0.01). This ratio is a measure of executive function where higher values indicate worse performance. Among diabetic participants (n = 1,523), long (defined as ≥9 h per day) vs. normal sleep duration (defined as 7-8 hours per day) was associated with a higher TMT ratio (P < 0.05). Similar significant results were observed in diabetic individuals without pharmacological treatment for diabetes (n = 1,062). Among non-diabetic participants (n = 17,246), no association between long sleep duration and the TMT ratio was observed (P > 0.05). Instead, short (defined as <7 h per day) vs. normal sleep duration was linked to a higher TMT ratio (P < 0.05). These findings suggest that the association between sleep duration and executive function differs between diabetic and non-diabetic middle-aged and older adults. Based on the cross-sectional design of the study, no firm conclusions can be drawn on the causality of the relations.

Keywords
Cohort study, Diabetes, Executive function, Sleep duration
National Category
Endocrinology and Diabetes
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-401482 (URN)10.1016/j.psyneuen.2019.104472 (DOI)000503085600005 ()31610410 (PubMedID)
Funder
Novo Nordisk, NNF190C0056777The Swedish Brain Foundation, F02019-0028Swedish Research Council, 2015-03100Åke Wiberg Foundation, M18-0169Fredrik och Ingrid Thurings Stiftelse, 2018-00365Swedish Society for Medical Research (SSMF), P18-0084
Available from: 2020-01-08 Created: 2020-01-08 Last updated: 2020-01-22Bibliographically approved
Boström, A., Chatzittofis, A., Ciuculete, D.-M., Flanagan, J. N., Krattinger, R., Bandstein, M., . . . Jokinen, J. (2020). Hypermethylation-associated downregulation of microRNA-4456 in hypersexual disorder with putative influence on oxytocin signalling: A DNA methylation analysis of miRNA genes. Epigenetics, 15(1-2), 145-160
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Hypermethylation-associated downregulation of microRNA-4456 in hypersexual disorder with putative influence on oxytocin signalling: A DNA methylation analysis of miRNA genes
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2020 (English)In: Epigenetics, ISSN 1559-2294, E-ISSN 1559-2308, Vol. 15, no 1-2, p. 145-160Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Hypersexual disorder (HD) was proposed as a diagnosis in the DSM-5 and the classification ?Compulsive Sexual Behavior Disorder? is now presented as an impulse-control disorder in ICD-11. HD incorporates several pathophysiological mechanisms; including impulsivity, compulsivity, sexual desire dysregulation and sexual addiction. No previous study investigated HD in a methylation analysis limited to microRNA (miRNA) associated CpG-sites. The genome wide methylation pattern was measured in whole blood from 60 subjects with HD and 33 healthy volunteers using the Illumina EPIC BeadChip. 8,852 miRNA associated CpG-sites were investigated in multiple linear regression analyses of methylation M-values to a binary independent variable of disease state (HD or healthy volunteer), adjusting for optimally determined covariates. Expression levels of candidate miRNAs were investigated in the same individuals for differential expression analysis. Candidate methylation loci were further studied for an association with alcohol dependence in an independent cohort of 107 subjects. Two CpG-sites were borderline significant in HD ? cg18222192 (MIR708)(p < 10E-05,p(FDR) = 5.81E-02) and cg01299774 (MIR4456)(p < 10E-06, p(FDR) = 5.81E-02). MIR4456 was significantly lower expressed in HD in both univariate (p < 0.0001) and multivariate (p < 0.05) analyses. Cg01299774 methylation levels were inversely correlated with expression levels of MIR4456 (p < 0.01) and were also differentially methylated in alcohol dependence (p = 0.026). Gene target prediction and pathway analysis revealed that MIR4456 putatively targets genes preferentially expressed in brain and that are involved in major neuronal molecular mechanisms thought to be relevant for HD, e.g., the oxytocin signalling pathway. In summary, our study implicates a potential contribution of MIR4456 in the pathophysiology of HD by putatively influencing oxytocin signalling.

Keywords
Methylome-wide, DNA methylation, hypersexual disorder, MicroRNA, oxytocin signaling, oxytocin, psychiatry, hsa-miR-4456, microRNA-4456, MIR4456, epigenetic dysregulation, differential methylation, microRNA expression, gene target prediction, epigenetics
National Category
Medical Genetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-408133 (URN)10.1080/15592294.2019.1656157 (DOI)000489812500001 ()31542994 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council
Available from: 2020-04-06 Created: 2020-04-06 Last updated: 2020-04-06Bibliographically approved
Rukh, G., Dang, J., Olivo, G., Ciuculete, D.-M., Rask-Andersen, M. & Schiöth, H. B. (2020). Personality, lifestyle and job satisfaction: causal association between neuroticism and job satisfaction using Mendelian randomisation in the UK biobank cohort. Translational Psychiatry, 10(1), Article ID 11.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Personality, lifestyle and job satisfaction: causal association between neuroticism and job satisfaction using Mendelian randomisation in the UK biobank cohort
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2020 (English)In: Translational Psychiatry, ISSN 2158-3188, E-ISSN 2158-3188, Vol. 10, no 1, article id 11Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Job-related stress has been associated with poor health outcomes but little is known about the causal nature of these findings. We employed Mendelian randomisation (MR) approach to investigate the causal effect of neuroticism, education, and physical activity on job satisfaction. Trait-specific genetic risk score (GRS) based on recent genome wide association studies were used as instrumental variables (IV) using the UK Biobank cohort (N = 315,536). Both single variable and multivariable MR analyses were used to determine the effect of each trait on job satisfaction. We observed a clear evidence of a causal association between neuroticism and job satisfaction. In single variable MR, one standard deviation (1 SD) higher genetically determined neuroticism score (4.07 units) was associated with -0.31 units lower job satisfaction (95% confidence interval (CI): -0.38 to -0.24; P = 9.5 x 10(-20)). The causal associations remained significant after performing sensitivity analyses by excluding invalid genetic variants from GRS(Neuroticism) (beta(95%CI): -0.28(-0.35 to -0.21); P = 3.4 x 10(-15)). Education (0.02; -0.08 to 0.12; 0.67) and physical activity (0.08; -0.34 to 0.50; 0.70) did not show any evidence for causal association with job satisfaction. When genetic instruments for neuroticism, education and physical activity were included together, the association of neuroticism score with job satisfaction was reduced by only -0.01 units, suggesting an independent inverse causal association between neuroticism score (P = 2.7 x 10(-17)) and job satisfaction. Our findings show an independent causal association between neuroticism score and job satisfaction. Physically active lifestyle may help to increase job satisfaction despite presence of high neuroticism scores. Our study highlights the importance of considering the confounding effect of negative personality traits for studies on job satisfaction.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
NATURE PUBLISHING GROUP, 2020
National Category
Psychiatry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-407512 (URN)10.1038/s41398-020-0691-3 (DOI)000515817100002 ()32066660 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council
Available from: 2020-03-26 Created: 2020-03-26 Last updated: 2020-03-26Bibliographically approved
Kanders, S. H., Pisanu, C., Bandstein, M., Jonsson, J., Castelao, E., Pistis, G., . . . Mwinyi, J. (2019). A pharmacogenetic risk score for the evaluation of major depression severity under treatment with antidepressants. Drug development research (Print), 1-12
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A pharmacogenetic risk score for the evaluation of major depression severity under treatment with antidepressants
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2019 (English)In: Drug development research (Print), ISSN 0272-4391, E-ISSN 1098-2299, p. 1-12Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

The severity of symptoms as well as efficacy of antidepressants in major depressive disorder (MDD) is modified by single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in different genes, which may contribute in an additive or synergistic fashion. We aimed to investigate depression severity in participants with MDD under treatment with antidepressants in relation to the combinatory effect of selected genetic variants combined using a genetic risk score (GRS). The sample included 150 MDD patients on regular AD therapy from the population-based Swiss PsyCoLaus cohort. We investigated 44 SNPs previously associated with antidepressant response by ranking them with regard to their association to the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Short Depression Scale (CES-D) score using random forest. The three top scoring SNPs (rs12248560, rs878567, rs17710780) were subsequently combined into an unweighted GRS, which was included in linear and logistic regression models using the CES-D score, occurrence of a major depressive episode (MDE) during follow-up and regular antidepressant treatment during the 6 months preceding follow-up assessment as outcomes. The GRS was associated with MDE occurrence (p = .02) and ln CES-D score (p = .001). The HTR1A rs878567 variant was associated with ln CES-D after adjustment for demographic and clinical variables [p = .02, lower scores for minor allele (G) carriers]. Additionally, rs12248560 (CYP2C19) CC homozygotes showed a six-fold higher likelihood of regular AD therapy at follow-up compared to minor allele homozygotes [TT; ultrarapid metabolizers (p = .03)]. Our study suggests that the cumulative consideration of pharmacogenetic risk variants more reliably reflects the impact of the genetic background on depression severity than individual SNPs.

Keywords
depression, genetic risk score, pharmacogenetics, random forest, treatment with antidepressants
National Category
Pharmacology and Toxicology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-396498 (URN)10.1002/ddr.21609 (DOI)000491048200001 ()31617956 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2013-2892
Available from: 2019-11-06 Created: 2019-11-06 Last updated: 2020-01-09Bibliographically approved
Rångtell, F. H., Karamchedu, S., Andersson, P., Liethof, L., Bucaro, M. O., Lampola, L., . . . Benedict, C. (2019). A single night of sleep loss impairs objective but not subjective working memory performance in a sex-dependent manner. Journal of Sleep Research, 28(1), Article ID e12651.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A single night of sleep loss impairs objective but not subjective working memory performance in a sex-dependent manner
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2019 (English)In: Journal of Sleep Research, ISSN 0962-1105, E-ISSN 1365-2869, Vol. 28, no 1, article id e12651Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Acute sleep deprivation can lead to judgement errors and thereby increases the risk of accidents, possibly due to an impaired working memory. However, whether the adverse effects of acute sleep loss on working memory are modulated by auditory distraction in women and men are not known. Additionally, it is unknown whether sleep loss alters the way in which men and women perceive their working memory performance. Thus, 24 young adults (12 women using oral contraceptives at the time of investigation) participated in two experimental conditions: nocturnal sleep (scheduled between 22:30 and 06:30 hours) versus one night of total sleep loss. Participants were administered a digital working memory test in which eight-digit sequences were learned and retrieved in the morning after each condition. Learning of digital sequences was accompanied by either silence or auditory distraction (equal distribution among trials). After sequence retrieval, each trial ended with a question regarding how certain participants were of the correctness of their response, as a self-estimate of working memory performance. We found that sleep loss impaired objective but not self-estimated working memory performance in women. In contrast, both measures remained unaffected by sleep loss in men. Auditory distraction impaired working memory performance, without modulation by sleep loss or sex. Being unaware of cognitive limitations when sleep-deprived, as seen in our study, could lead to undesirable consequences in, for example, an occupational context. Our findings suggest that sleep-deprived young women are at particular risk for overestimating their working memory performance.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2019
Keywords
sound distraction, women and men, nocturnal wakefulness, subjective performance, cognition
National Category
Applied Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-376724 (URN)10.1111/jsr.12651 (DOI)000456255400005 ()29383809 (PubMedID)
Funder
Fredrik och Ingrid Thurings StiftelseSwedish Research Council, 2015-03100Åke Wiberg FoundationThe Swedish Brain Foundation, FO2016-0092Swedish Society of MedicineTore Nilsons Stiftelse för medicinsk forskningNovo Nordisk, NNF14OC0009349Erik, Karin och Gösta Selanders FoundationAFA Insurance, 140006Swedish Research Council
Available from: 2019-02-11 Created: 2019-02-11 Last updated: 2020-01-09Bibliographically approved
Gaudio, S., Carducci, F., Piervincenzi, C., Olivo, G. & Schiöth, H. B. (2019). Altered thalamo-cortical and occipital-parietal-temporal-frontal white matter connections in patients with anorexia and bulimia nervosa: a systematic review of diffusion tensor imaging studies. Journal of Psychiatry & Neuroscience, 44(5), 324-339
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Altered thalamo-cortical and occipital-parietal-temporal-frontal white matter connections in patients with anorexia and bulimia nervosa: a systematic review of diffusion tensor imaging studies
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2019 (English)In: Journal of Psychiatry & Neuroscience, ISSN 1180-4882, E-ISSN 1488-2434, Vol. 44, no 5, p. 324-339Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa are complex mental disorders, and their etiology is still not fully understood. This paper reviews the literature on diffusion tensor imaging studies in patients with anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa to explore the usefulness of white matter microstructural analysis in understanding the pathophysiology of eating disorders.

Methods: We followed the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines to identify diffusion tensor imaging studies that compared patients with an eating disorder to control groups. We searched relevant databases for studies published from database inception to August 2018, using combinations of select keywords. We categorized white matter tracts according to their 3 main classes: projection (i.e., thalamo-cortical), association (i.e., occipital-parietal-temporal-frontal) and commissural (e.g., corpus callosum).

Results: We included 19 papers that investigated a total of 427 participants with current or previous eating disorders and 444 controls. Overall, the studies used different diffusion tensor imaging approaches and showed widespread white matter abnormalities in patients with eating disorders. Despite differences among the studies, patients with anorexia nervosa showed mainly white matter microstructural abnormalities of thalamo-cortical tracts (i.e., corona radiata, thalamic radiations) and occipital-parietal-temporal-frontal tracts (i.e., left superior longitudinal and inferior fronto-occipital fasciculi). It was less clear whether white matter alterations persist after recovery from anorexia nervosa. Available data on bulimia nervosa were partially similar to those for anorexia nervosa.

Limitations: Study sample composition and diffusion tensor imaging analysis techniques were heterogeneous. The number of studies on bulimia nervosa was too limited to be conclusive.

Conclusion: White matter microstructure appears to be affected in anorexia nervosa, and these alterations may play a role in the pathophysiology of this eating disorder. Although we found white matter alterations in bulimia nervosa that were similar to those in anorexia nervosa, white matter changes in bulimia nervosa remain poorly investigated, and these findings were less conclusive. Further studies with longitudinal designs and multi-approach analyses are needed to better understand the role of white matter changes in eating disorders.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
CMA-CANADIAN MEDICAL ASSOC, 2019
National Category
Psychiatry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-394717 (URN)10.1503/jpn.180121 (DOI)000484083400005 ()30994310 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-10-11 Created: 2019-10-11 Last updated: 2020-01-09Bibliographically approved
Tan, X., Titova, O. E., Lindberg, E., Elmståhl, S., Lind, L., Schiöth, H. B. & Benedict, C. (2019). Association Between Self-Reported Sleep Duration and Body Composition in Middle-Aged and Older Adults. Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine (JCSM), 15(3), 431-435
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Association Between Self-Reported Sleep Duration and Body Composition in Middle-Aged and Older Adults
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2019 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine (JCSM), ISSN 1550-9389, E-ISSN 1550-9397, Vol. 15, no 3, p. 431-435Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

STUDY OBJECTIVES: The current study sought to examine whether self-reported sleep duration is linked to an adverse body composition in 19,709 adults aged 45 to 75 years.

METHODS: All variables used in the current study were derived from the Swedish EpiHealth cohort study. Habitual sleep duration was measured by questionnaires. Body composition was assessed by bioimpedance. The main outcome variables were fat mass and fat-free mass (in kg). Analysis of covariance adjusting for age, sex, fat mass in the case of fat-free mass (and vice versa), leisure time physical activity, smoking, and alcohol consumption was used to investigate the association between sleep duration and body composition.

RESULTS: Short sleep (defined as ≤ 5 hours sleep per day) and long sleep (defined as 8 or more hours of sleep per day) were associated with lower fat-free mass and higher fat mass, compared with 6 to 7 hours of sleep duration (P< .05).

CONCLUSIONS: These observations could suggest that both habitual short and long sleep may contribute to two common clinical phenotypes in middle-aged and older humans, ie, body adiposity and sarcopenia. However, the observational nature of our study does not allow for causal interpretation.

Keywords
body fat, elderly, fat-free mass, middle-aged, sleep
National Category
Neurosciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-379286 (URN)10.5664/jcsm.7668 (DOI)000461417900009 ()30853046 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research CouncilNovo Nordisk, NNF14OC0009349Swedish Research Council, 2015-03100Ernfors FoundationÅke Wiberg Foundation, M17-0088Åke Wiberg Foundation, M18-0169Fredrik och Ingrid Thurings Stiftelse, 2017-00313Fredrik och Ingrid Thurings Stiftelse, 2018-00365
Available from: 2019-03-14 Created: 2019-03-14 Last updated: 2020-01-09Bibliographically approved
Tan, X., Ciuculete, D.-M., Schiöth, H. B. & Benedict, C. (2019). Associations between chronotype, MTNR1B genotype and risk of type 2 diabetes in UK Biobank. Journal of Internal Medicine
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Associations between chronotype, MTNR1B genotype and risk of type 2 diabetes in UK Biobank
2019 (English)In: Journal of Internal Medicine, ISSN 0954-6820, E-ISSN 1365-2796Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Objective

To examine the association between the MTNR1B G risk allele, type 2 diabetes (T2D) and chronotype in the UK Biobank.

Methods

Data from the baseline investigation of the UK Biobank were utilized (n = 337 083 White British; mean age: 56.9 years; 54% women). MTNR1B rs10830963 was directly genotyped [CC (reference group), CG and GG]. Chronotype was divided into four categories: definitely morning (reference group); more morning than evening; more evening than morning; and definitely evening. Logistic regression analyses were performed to estimate odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for T2D, controlling for age, sex and other confounders.

Results

Carriers of the rs10830963 risk allele had a higher risk of T2D [CG vs. CC: OR (95% CI) 1.10 (1.07, 1.15); GG vs. CC: 1.21 (1.14, 1.29)]. Compared with definitely morning chronotype, participants with definitely evening chronotype exhibited the highest risk of T2D [1.25 (1.17, 1.33)]. Despite a nonsignificant interaction between chronotype and the risk allele [0.98 (0.94, 1.01), P = 0.176 for interaction term], we found that definitely evening chronotype (vs. definitely morning) was linked with a higher risk of T2D amongst CC and CG but not GG carriers. Additionally, we saw that the GG genotype (vs. CC) was associated with a higher risk of T2D across all chronotype categories, except for definitely evening.

Conclusion

Our findings suggest that the MTNR1B G risk allele and late chronotype increase the risk of T2D. The association between late chronotype and higher risk of T2D appears to vary across MTNR1B rs10830963 genotypes.

Keywords
chronotype, genetic risk, melatonin receptor 1B polymorphism, type 2 diabetes, UK Biobank
National Category
Neurology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-397675 (URN)10.1111/joim.12994 (DOI)000494559800001 ()31623012 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2015-03100
Available from: 2019-11-28 Created: 2019-11-28 Last updated: 2020-01-09Bibliographically approved
Olivo, G., Gaudio, S. & Schiöth, H. B. (2019). Brain and Cognitive Development in Adolescents with Anorexia Nervosa: A Systematic Review of fMRI Studies. Nutrients, 11(8), Article ID 1907.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Brain and Cognitive Development in Adolescents with Anorexia Nervosa: A Systematic Review of fMRI Studies
2019 (English)In: Nutrients, ISSN 2072-6643, E-ISSN 2072-6643, Vol. 11, no 8, article id 1907Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Anorexia nervosa (AN) is an eating disorder often occurring in adolescence. AN has one of the highest mortality rates amongst psychiatric illnesses and is associated with medical complications and high risk for psychiatric comorbidities, persisting after treatment. Remission rates range from 23% to 33%. Moreover, weight recovery does not necessarily reflect cognitive recovery. This issue is of particular interest in adolescence, characterized by progressive changes in brain structure and functional circuitries, and fast cognitive development. We reviewed existing literature on fMRI studies in adolescents diagnosed with AN, following PRISMA guidelines. Eligible studies had to: (1) be written in English; (2) include only adolescent participants; and (3) use block-design fMRI. We propose a pathogenic model based on normal and AN-related neural and cognitive maturation during adolescence. We propose that underweight and delayed puberty-caused by genetic, environmental, and neurobehavioral factors-can affect brain and cognitive development and lead to impaired cognitive flexibility, which in turn sustains the perpetuation of aberrant behaviors in a vicious cycle. Moreover, greater punishment sensitivity causes a shift toward punishment-based learning, leading to greater anxiety and ultimately to excessive reappraisal over emotions. Treatments combining physiological and neurobehavioral rationales must be adopted to improve outcomes and prevent relapses.

Keywords
adolescents, adolescence, eating disorders, anorexia nervosa, fMRI, functional magnetic resonance imaging
National Category
Psychiatry Nutrition and Dietetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-395635 (URN)10.3390/nu11081907 (DOI)000484506000222 ()31443192 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council
Available from: 2019-10-23 Created: 2019-10-23 Last updated: 2020-01-09Bibliographically approved
Attwood, M. M. & Schiöth, H. B. (2019). Classification of Trispanins: A Diverse Group of Proteins That Function in Membrane Synthesis and Transport Mechanisms.. Frontiers in cell and developmental biology, 7, Article ID 386.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Classification of Trispanins: A Diverse Group of Proteins That Function in Membrane Synthesis and Transport Mechanisms.
2019 (English)In: Frontiers in cell and developmental biology, ISSN 2296-634X, Vol. 7, article id 386Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

As the structure and functions of proteins are correlated, investigating groups of proteins with the same gross structure may provide important insights about their functional roles. Trispanins, proteins that contain three alpha-helical transmembrane (3TM) regions, have not been previously studied considering their transmembrane features. Our comprehensive identification and classification using bioinformatic methods describe 152 3TM proteins. These proteins are frequently involved in membrane biosynthesis and lipid biogenesis, protein trafficking, catabolic processes, and in particular signal transduction due to the large ionotropic glutamate receptor family. Proteins that localize to intracellular compartments are overrepresented in the dataset in comparison to the entire human transmembrane proteome, and nearly 45% localize specifically to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Furthermore, nearly 20% of the trispanins function in lipid metabolic processes and transport, which are also overrepresented. Nearly one-third of trispanins are identified as being targeted by drugs and/or being associated with diseases. A high number of 3TMs have unknown functions and based on this analysis we speculate on the functional involvement of uncharacterized trispanins in relationship to disease or important cellular activities. This first overall study of trispanins provides a unique analysis of a diverse group of membrane proteins.

Keywords
cerebral cortex, fatty acid transport, ionotropic glutamate receptor, lipid metabolic process, membrane biosynthesis, transmembrane proteins, trispanins
National Category
Neurosciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-406515 (URN)10.3389/fcell.2019.00386 (DOI)32039202 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2020-03-09 Created: 2020-03-09 Last updated: 2020-03-28Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-7112-0921

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