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Rodhe, Allan
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Publications (10 of 36) Show all publications
Grip, H. & Rodhe, A. (2019). Water’s Journey from Rain to Stream (1ed.). Uppsala: Department Earth Sciences, Uppsala University
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Water’s Journey from Rain to Stream
2019 (English)Book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Uppsala: Department Earth Sciences, Uppsala University, 2019. p. 153 Edition: 1
National Category
Oceanography, Hydrology and Water Resources
Research subject
Hydrology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-375122 (URN)978-91-639-0457-8 (ISBN)
Available from: 2019-01-27 Created: 2019-01-27 Last updated: 2019-01-28Bibliographically approved
Grip, H. & Rodhe, A. (2016). Vattnets väg från regn till bäck (4ed.). Uppsala: Uppsala universitet
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Vattnets väg från regn till bäck
2016 (Swedish)Book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Uppsala: Uppsala universitet, 2016. p. 156 Edition: 4
National Category
Oceanography, Hydrology and Water Resources
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-307562 (URN)978-91-639-0456-1 (ISBN)
Available from: 2016-11-17 Created: 2016-11-17 Last updated: 2019-01-28Bibliographically approved
van der Velde, Y., Heidbuechel, I., Lyon, S. W., Nyberg, L., Rodhe, A., Bishop, K. & Troch, P. A. (2015). Consequences of mixing assumptions for time-variable travel time distributions. Hydrological Processes, 29(16), 3460-3474
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Consequences of mixing assumptions for time-variable travel time distributions
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2015 (English)In: Hydrological Processes, ISSN 0885-6087, E-ISSN 1099-1085, Vol. 29, no 16, p. 3460-3474Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The current generation of catchment travel time distribution (TTD) research, integrating nearly three decades of work since publication of Water's Journey from Rain to Stream, seeks to represent the full distribution in catchment travel times and its temporal variability. Here, we compare conceptualizations of increasing complexity with regards to mixing of water storages and evaluate how these assumptions influence time-variable TTD estimates for two catchments with contrasting climates: the Gardsjon catchment in Sweden and the Marshall Gulch catchment in Arizona, USA. Our results highlight that, as long as catchment TTDs cannot be measured directly but need to be inferred from input-output signals of catchments, the inferred catchment TTDs depend strongly on the underlying assumptions of mixing within a catchment. Furthermore, we found that the conceptualization of the evapotranspiration flux strongly influences the inferred travel times of stream discharge. For the wet and forested Gardsjon catchment in Sweden, we inferred that evapotranspiration most likely resembles a completely mixed sample of the water stored in the catchment; however, for the drier Marshall Gulch catchment in Arizona, evapotranspiration predominantly contained the younger water stored in the catchment. For the Marshall Gulch catchment, this higher probability for young water in evapotranspiration resulted in older water in the stream compared to travel times inferred with assumptions of complete mixing. New observations that focus on the TTD of the evapotranspiration flux and the actual travel time of water through a catchment are necessary to improve identification of mixing and consequently travel times of stream water.

Keywords
travel time distributions, catchment hydrology, connectivity, mixing assumptions
National Category
Oceanography, Hydrology and Water Resources
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-260830 (URN)10.1002/hyp.10372 (DOI)000358446700003 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2011-4390
Available from: 2015-08-26 Created: 2015-08-25 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved
Soto Gómez, A. J., di Baldassarre, G., Rodhe, A. & Pohjola, V. A. (2015). Remotely Sensed Nightlights to Map Societal Exposure to Hydrometeorological Hazards. Remote Sensing, 7(9), 12380-12399
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Remotely Sensed Nightlights to Map Societal Exposure to Hydrometeorological Hazards
2015 (English)In: Remote Sensing, ISSN 2072-4292, E-ISSN 2072-4292, Vol. 7, no 9, p. 12380-12399Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study used remotely sensed maps of nightlights to investigate the etiology of increasing disaster losses from hydrometeorological hazards in a data-scarce area. We explored trends in the probability of occurrence of hazardous events (extreme rainfall) and exposure of the local population as components of risk. The temporal variation of the spatial distribution of exposure to hydrometeorological hazards was studied using nightlight satellite imagery as a proxy. Temporal (yearly) and spatial (1 km) resolution make them more useful than official census data. Additionally, satellite nightlights can track informal (unofficial) human settlements. The study focused on the Samala River catchment in Guatemala. The analyses of disasters, using DesInventar Disaster Information Management System data, showed that fatalities caused by hydrometeorological events have increased. Such an increase in disaster losses can be explained by trends in both: (i) catchment conditions that tend to lead to more frequent hydrometeorological extremes (more frequent occurrence of days with wet conditions); and (ii) increasing human exposure to hazardous events (as observed by amount and intensity of nightlights in areas close to rivers). Our study shows the value of remote sensing data and provides a framework to explore the dynamics of disaster risk when ground data are spatially and temporally limited.

Keywords
Natural disasters trends, nighttime satellite images, nightlights, exposure mapping, local scale, Guatemala
National Category
Geosciences, Multidisciplinary
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-260706 (URN)10.3390/rs70912380 (DOI)000362511400065 ()
Funder
Sida - Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency, 54100006
Available from: 2015-08-24 Created: 2015-08-24 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
Soto Gómez, A. J., Rodhe, A., Pohjola, V. & Boelhouwers, J. (2015). Spatial Distribution of Disasters Caused by Natural Hazards in the Samala River Catchment, Guatemala. Geografiska Annaler. Series A, Physical Geography, 97(1), 181-196
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Spatial Distribution of Disasters Caused by Natural Hazards in the Samala River Catchment, Guatemala
2015 (English)In: Geografiska Annaler. Series A, Physical Geography, ISSN 0435-3676, E-ISSN 1468-0459, Vol. 97, no 1, p. 181-196Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Understanding the conditions of the locations where disasters are reported and applying that knowledge to disaster risk reduction actions is essential and especially needed on the local scale. This study assessed how important the physical configuration is as cause of disasters by studying the links between the locations where disasters have been reported and the physical attributes of those locations. The Samala River catchment in Guatemala was used as a case study because it is a relatively small but complex area exposed to multiple natural hazards. Disasters of hydro-meteorological origin were addressed for the study because they are the most frequent type of disasters reported in the area. The method proposed in this work classified the study area into geomorphological units that were used to analyze where disasters were reported, the physical conditions of the particular locations of disaster reports, and to what degree disasters are spatially linked to slope and temporally to precipitation. We found that analyzing the study area based on the geomorphological configuration was useful and allowed analyses on comparatively homogeneous zones and to hypothesize on the particular geomorphological processes related to the occurrences of disasters. For steep geomorphological units we found a clear spatial relationship between the number of disasters reported and the slope of the locations, with higher frequency of disasters in the less sloping areas of the unit. The need to consider social factors for understanding this relationship was emphasized. As expected there was a very strong temporal relationship between disaster occurrence and wetness, as estimated from the antecedent rainfall, with high risk for disaster at high wetness. The applied methodological approach provides a tool for disaster research on physically complex areas, which is common to active tectonic and volcanic regions.

Keywords
spatial distribution, natural disasters, physical causes of natural disasters, Guatemala
National Category
Physical Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-251500 (URN)10.1111/geoa.12097 (DOI)000350500400012 ()
Available from: 2015-04-23 Created: 2015-04-20 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved
Kauffeldt, A., Halldin, S., Rodhe, A., Xu, C.-Y. & Westerberg, I. K. (2013). Disinformative data in large-scale hydrological modelling. Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 17(7), 2845-2857
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Disinformative data in large-scale hydrological modelling
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2013 (English)In: Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, ISSN 1027-5606, E-ISSN 1607-7938, Vol. 17, no 7, p. 2845-2857Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Large-scale hydrological modelling has become an important tool for the study of global and regional water resources, climate impacts, and water-resources management. However, modelling efforts over large spatial domains are fraught with problems of data scarcity, uncertainties and inconsistencies between model forcing and evaluation data. Model-independent methods to screen and analyse data for such problems are needed. This study aimed at identifying data inconsistencies in global datasets using a pre-modelling analysis, inconsistencies that can be disinformative for subsequent modelling. The consistency between (i) basin areas for different hydrographic datasets, and (ii) between climate data (precipitation and potential evaporation) and discharge data, was examined in terms of how well basin areas were represented in the flow networks and the possibility of water-balance closure. It was found that (i) most basins could be well represented in both gridded basin delineations and polygon-based ones, but some basins exhibited large area discrepancies between flow-network datasets and archived basin areas, (ii) basins exhibiting too-high runoff coefficients were abundant in areas where precipitation data were likely affected by snow undercatch, and (iii) the occurrence of basins exhibiting losses exceeding the potential-evaporation limit was strongly dependent on the potential-evaporation data, both in terms of numbers and geographical distribution. Some inconsistencies may be resolved by considering subgrid variability in climate data, surface-dependent potential-evaporation estimates, etc., but further studies are needed to determine the reasons for the inconsistencies found. Our results emphasise the need for pre-modelling data analysis to identify dataset inconsistencies as an important first step in any large-scale study. Applying data-screening methods before modelling should also increase our chances to draw robust conclusions from subsequent model simulations.

National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-206677 (URN)10.5194/hess-17-2845-2013 (DOI)000322376000031 ()
Available from: 2013-09-03 Created: 2013-09-02 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Davies, J., Beven, K., Rodhe, A., Nyberg, L. & Bishop, K. (2013). Integrated modeling of flow and residence times at the catchment scale with multiple interacting pathways. Water resources research, 49(8), 4738-4750
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Integrated modeling of flow and residence times at the catchment scale with multiple interacting pathways
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2013 (English)In: Water resources research, ISSN 0043-1397, E-ISSN 1944-7973, Vol. 49, no 8, p. 4738-4750Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

There is still a need for catchment hydrological and transport models that properly integrate the effects of preferential flows while accounting for differences in velocities and celerities. A modeling methodology is presented here which uses particle tracking methods to simulate both flow and transport in multiple pathways in a single consistent solution. Water fluxes and storages are determined by the volume and density of particles and transport is attained by labeling the particles with information that may be tracked throughout the lifetime of that particle in the catchment. The methodology allows representation of preferential flows through the use of particle velocity distributions, and mixing between pathways can be achieved with pathway transition probabilities. A transferable 3-D modeling methodology is presented for the first time and applied to a unique step-shift isotope experiment that was carried out at the 0.63 ha G1 catchment in Gardsjon, Sweden. This application highlights the importance of combining flow and transport in hydrological representations, and the importance of pathway velocity distributions and interactions in obtaining a satisfactory representation of the observations.

Keywords
residence time, catchment modeling, isotope
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-210264 (URN)10.1002/wrcr.20377 (DOI)000324838300017 ()
Available from: 2013-11-05 Created: 2013-11-04 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Kizza, M., Guerrero, J.-L., Rodhe, A., Xu, C.-Y. & Ntale, H. K. (2013). Modelling catchment inflows into Lake Victoria: regionalisation of the parameters of a conceptual water balance model. Hydrology Research, 44(5), 789-808
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Modelling catchment inflows into Lake Victoria: regionalisation of the parameters of a conceptual water balance model
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2013 (English)In: Hydrology Research, ISSN 1998-9563, Vol. 44, no 5, p. 789-808Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The goal of this study was to evaluate regionalisation methods that could be used for modelling catchment inflows into Lake Victoria. WASMOD, a conceptual water balance model, was applied to nine gauged sub-basins in Lake Victoria basin in order to test the transferability of model parameters between the basins using three regionalisation approaches. Model calibration was carried out within the GLUE (generalised likelihood uncertainty estimation) framework for uncertainty assessment. The analysis was carried out for the period 1967-2000. Parameter transferability was assessed by comparing the likelihood values of regionalised simulations with the values under calibration for each basin. WASMOD performed well for all study sub-basins with Nash-Sutcliffe values ranging between 0.70 and 0.82. Transferability results were mixed. For the proxy-basin method, the best performing parameter donor basin was Mara with four proxy basins giving acceptable results. Sio, Sondu, Gucha and Duma also performed well. The global mean method gave acceptable performance for seven of the nine study basins. The ensemble regionalisation method provides the possibility to consider parameter uncertainty in the regionalisation. Ensemble regionalisation method performed best with an average departure of 40% from the observed mean annual flows compared to 48 and 60% for proxy-basin and global mean methods, respectively.

Keywords
ensemble regionalisation, generalised likelihood uncertainty estimation, Lake Victoria, proxy-basin, rainfall-runoff modelling, regionalisation
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-213099 (URN)10.2166/nh.2012.152 (DOI)000326902700004 ()
Available from: 2013-12-19 Created: 2013-12-18 Last updated: 2014-01-09Bibliographically approved
Kizza, M., Westerberg, I., Rodhe, A. & Ntale, H. K. (2012). Estimating areal rainfall over Lake Victoria and its basin using ground-based and satellite data. Journal of Hydrology, 464, 401-411
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Estimating areal rainfall over Lake Victoria and its basin using ground-based and satellite data
2012 (English)In: Journal of Hydrology, ISSN 0022-1694, E-ISSN 1879-2707, Vol. 464, p. 401-411Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A gridded monthly rainfall dataset having a spatial resolution of 2 km and covering the period 1960–2004 was derived for the Lake Victoria basin. The lake and its basin support more than 30 million people and also contribute substantially to the River Nile flow. The major challenge in the estimation of the Lake Victoria water balance is the estimation of the rainfall over the lake, which is further complicated by the varying quality and spatial coverage of rain-gauge data in the basin. In this study, these problems were addressed by using rain-gauge data for 315 stations around the basin and satellite-derived precipitation data from two products to derive a monthly precipitation dataset for the entire basin, including the lake. First, the rain-gauge data were quality controlled. Thereafter short gaps were filled in the daily data series which resulted in 9,429 additional months of data. Two spatial interpolation methods were used for generating the gridded rainfall dataset and the universal kriging method performed slightly better than the inverse distance weighting method. The enhancement of rainfall over the lake surface was addressed by estimating a relationship between rain-gauge and satellite data. Two satellite rainfall products, TRMM 3B43 and PERSIANN were compared to the interpolated monthly rain-gauge data for the land part of the basin. The bias in the TRMM 3B43 rainfall estimates was higher than the bias for PERSIANN but its correlation was higher with a better representation of the intra-annual variability. The TRMM 3B43 product showed an enhancement of lake rainfall over basin rainfall of 33% while the PERSIANN product gave a much higher enhancement of up to 85%.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2012
Keywords
Lake Victoria, precipitation, spatial interpolation, inverse distance weighting, universal kriging, TRMM 3B43, PERSIANN
National Category
Oceanography, Hydrology and Water Resources
Research subject
Hydrology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-179067 (URN)10.1016/j.jhydrol.2012.07.024 (DOI)000309783700031 ()
Available from: 2012-08-07 Created: 2012-08-07 Last updated: 2018-01-12Bibliographically approved
Rodhe, A. (2012). Physical models for classroom teaching in hydrology. Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 16(9), 3075-3082
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Physical models for classroom teaching in hydrology
2012 (English)In: Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, ISSN 1027-5606, E-ISSN 1607-7938, Vol. 16, no 9, p. 3075-3082Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Hydrology teaching benefits from the fact that many important processes can be illustrated and explained with simple physical models. A set of mobile physical models has been developed and used during many years of lecturing at basic university level teaching in hydrology. One model, with which many phenomena can be demonstrated, consists of a 1.0-m-long plexiglass container containing an about 0.25-m-deep open sand aquifer through which water is circulated. The model can be used for showing the groundwater table and its influence on the water content in the unsaturated zone and for quantitative determination of hydraulic properties such as the storage coefficient and the saturated hydraulic conductivity. It is also well suited for discussions on the runoff process and the significance of recharge and discharge areas for groundwater. The flow paths of water and contaminant dispersion can be illustrated in tracer experiments using fluorescent or colour dye. This and a few other physical models, with suggested demonstrations and experiments, are described in this article. The finding from using models in classroom teaching is that it creates curiosity among the students, promotes discussions and most likely deepens the understanding of the basic processes.

National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-187741 (URN)10.5194/hess-16-3075-2012 (DOI)000310475400001 ()
Available from: 2012-12-10 Created: 2012-12-10 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
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