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Tano, Eva
Publications (10 of 15) Show all publications
Skorup, P., Maudsdotter, L., Tano, E., Lipcsey, M., Castegren, M., Larsson, A. & Sjölin, J. (2018). Dynamics of Endotoxin, Inflammatory Variables, and Organ Dysfunction After Treatment With Antibiotics in an Escherichia coli Porcine Intensive Care Sepsis Model. Critical Care Medicine, 46(7), e634-e641
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Dynamics of Endotoxin, Inflammatory Variables, and Organ Dysfunction After Treatment With Antibiotics in an Escherichia coli Porcine Intensive Care Sepsis Model
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2018 (English)In: Critical Care Medicine, ISSN 0090-3493, E-ISSN 1530-0293, Vol. 46, no 7, p. e634-e641Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVES: To investigate the dynamics of antibiotic-induced endotoxin liberation and inflammatory response in vivo in a clinically relevant large animal intensive care sepsis model and whether the addition of an aminoglycoside to a β-lactam antibiotic affects these responses.

DESIGN: Prospective, placebo-controlled interventional experimental study.

SETTING: University research unit.

SUBJECTS: Thirty-six healthy pigs administered Escherichia coli as a 3-hour infusion.

INTERVENTIONS: After 2 hours, during E. coli infusion, the animals were exposed to cefuroxime alone, the combination of cefuroxime and tobramycin, or saline.

MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Plasma endotoxin, interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-α, leucocytes, and organ dysfunction were recorded for 4 hours after antibiotic treatment, and differences to the values before treatment were calculated. In vitro experiments were performed to ascertain whether endotoxin is released during antibiotic-induced bacterial killing of this E. coli strain. Despite differences between the treatment arms in vitro, no differences in plasma endotoxin were observed in vivo. Antibiotic-treated animals demonstrated a higher interleukin-6 response (p < 0.001), greater leucocyte activation (p < 0.001), and more pronounced deterioration in pulmonary static compliance (p < 0.01) over time than controls. Animals treated with the combination showed a trend toward less inflammation.

CONCLUSIONS: Treatment with antibiotics may elicit an increased inflammatory interleukin-6 response that is associated with leucocyte activation and pulmonary organ dysfunction. No observable differences were detected in plasma endotoxin concentrations. The reduction in cefuroxime-induced endotoxin release after the addition of an aminoglycoside in vitro could not be reproduced in this model.

National Category
Infectious Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-349226 (URN)10.1097/CCM.0000000000003139 (DOI)000435290400002 ()29595561 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-04-23 Created: 2018-04-23 Last updated: 2018-08-31Bibliographically approved
Smolle, C., Huss, F., Lindblad, M., Reischies, F. & Tano, E. (2018). Effectiveness of automated ultraviolet-C light for decontamination of textiles inoculated with Enterococcus faecium.. Journal of Hospital Infection, 98(1), 102-104
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effectiveness of automated ultraviolet-C light for decontamination of textiles inoculated with Enterococcus faecium.
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2018 (English)In: Journal of Hospital Infection, ISSN 0195-6701, E-ISSN 1532-2939, Vol. 98, no 1, p. 102-104Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Healthcare textiles are increasingly recognized as potential vehicles for transmission of hospital-acquired infections. This study tested the ability of an automated ultraviolet-C (UV-C) room disinfection device (Tru-D Smart UV-C) to decontaminate textiles inoculated with Enterococcus faecium in a clinical setting. Contaminated polycotton (50/50 polyester/cotton) swatches were distributed to predefined locations in a ward room and exposed to UV-C light. UV-C decontamination reduced E. faecium counts by a mean log10 reduction factor of 1.37 (all P = 0.005, Wilcoxon signed rank test). UV-C decontamination may be a feasible adjunctive measure to conventional laundering to preserve the cleanliness of healthcare textiles in ward rooms.

Keywords
Efficacy, Enterococcus faecium, Healthcare textile, UV-C decontamination
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-334010 (URN)10.1016/j.jhin.2017.07.034 (DOI)000418657200019 ()28827192 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-11-20 Created: 2017-11-20 Last updated: 2018-01-29Bibliographically approved
Baltekin, Ö., Boucharin, A., Tano, E., Andersson, D. I. & Elf, J. (2017). Antibiotic susceptibility testing in less than 30 min using direct single-cell imaging. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 114(34), 9170-9175
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Antibiotic susceptibility testing in less than 30 min using direct single-cell imaging
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2017 (English)In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, ISSN 0027-8424, E-ISSN 1091-6490, Vol. 114, no 34, p. 9170-9175Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The emergence and spread of antibiotic-resistant bacteria are aggravated by incorrect prescription and use of antibiotics. A core problem is that there is no sufficiently fast diagnostic test to guide correct antibiotic prescription at the point of care. Here, we investigate if it is possible to develop a point-of-care susceptibility test for urinary tract infection, a disease that 100 million women suffer from annually and that exhibits widespread antibiotic resistance. We capture bacterial cells directly from samples with low bacterial counts (10(4) cfu/mL) using a custom-designed microfluidic chip and monitor their individual growth rates using microscopy. By averaging the growth rate response to an antibiotic over many individual cells, we can push the detection time to the biological response time of the bacteria. We find that it is possible to detect changes in growth rate in response to each of nine antibiotics that are used to treat urinary tract infections in minutes. In a test of 49 clinical uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) isolates, all were correctly classified as susceptible or resistant to ciprofloxacin in less than 10 min. The total time for antibiotic susceptibility testing, from loading of sample to diagnostic readout, is less than 30 min, which allows the development of a point-of-care test that can guide correct treatment of urinary tract infection.

Keywords
point of care, UTI, AST, antibiotic, resistance, microfluidic
National Category
Basic Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-333967 (URN)10.1073/pnas.1708558114 (DOI)000408095300072 ()
Available from: 2017-12-13 Created: 2017-12-13 Last updated: 2018-01-13Bibliographically approved
Schönning, C., Jernberg, C., Klingenberg, D., Andersson, S., Pääjärvi, A., Alm, E., . . . Lytsy, B. (2017). Legionellosis acquired through a dental unit: a case study. Journal of Hospital Infection, 96(1), 89-92
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Legionellosis acquired through a dental unit: a case study
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2017 (English)In: Journal of Hospital Infection, ISSN 0195-6701, E-ISSN 1532-2939, Vol. 96, no 1, p. 89-92Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In 2012, an elderly immunocompromised man died from legionellosis at a hospital in Uppsala, Sweden. The patient had visited a dental ward at the hospital during the incubation period. Legionella spp. at a concentration of 2000 colony-forming units/L were isolated from the cupfiller outlet providing water for oral rinsing. Isolates from the patient and the dental unit were Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1, subgroup Knoxville and ST9. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and whole-genome sequencing strongly suggested that the isolates were of common origin. This report presents one of few documented cases of legionellosis acquired through a dental unit.

Keywords
Vårdhygien
National Category
Microbiology in the medical area
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-318018 (URN)10.1016/j.jhin.2017.01.009 (DOI)000400397700019 ()28228245 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-03-23 Created: 2017-03-23 Last updated: 2018-01-13Bibliographically approved
Osbjer, K., Tano, E., Chhayheng, L., Mac-Kwashie, A. O., Fernstrom, L.-L., Ellström, P., . . . Magnusson, U. (2016). Detection of Campylobacter in human and animal field samples in Cambodia. Acta Pathologica, Microbiologica et Immunologica Scandinavica (APMIS), 124(6), 508-515
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Detection of Campylobacter in human and animal field samples in Cambodia
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2016 (English)In: Acta Pathologica, Microbiologica et Immunologica Scandinavica (APMIS), ISSN 0903-4641, E-ISSN 1600-0463, Vol. 124, no 6, p. 508-515Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Campylobacter are zoonotic bacteria and a leading cause of human gastroenteritis worldwide with Campylobacter jejuni and C. coli being the most commonly detected species. The aim of this study was to detect Campylobacter in humans and livestock (chickens, ducks, pigs, cattle, water buffalo, quail, pigeons and geese) in rural households by routine culturing and multiplex PCR in faecal samples frozen before analysis. Of 681 human samples, 82 (12%) tested positive by PCR (C. jejuni in 66 samples and C. coli in 16), but none by routine culture. Children were more commonly Campylobacter positive (19%) than adult males (8%) and females (7%). Of 853 livestock samples, 106 (12%) tested positive by routine culture and 352 (41%) by PCR. Campylobacter jejuni was more frequent in chickens and ducks and C. coli in pigs. In conclusion, Campylobacter proved to be highly prevalent by PCR in children (19%), ducks (24%), chickens (56%) and pigs (72%). Routine culturing was insufficiently sensitive in detecting Campylobacter in field samples frozen before analysis. These findings suggest that PCR should be the preferred diagnostic method for detection of Campylobacter in humans and livestock where timely culture is not feasible.

Keywords
Campylobacter, Cambodia, humans, livestock, zoonosis
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-302222 (URN)10.1111/apm.12531 (DOI)000376602800010 ()26991032 (PubMedID)
External cooperation:
Funder
Swedish Civil Contingencies AgencySida - Swedish International Development Cooperation AgencySwedish Research Council Formas
Available from: 2016-09-01 Created: 2016-08-31 Last updated: 2017-11-21Bibliographically approved
Melki, V., Tano, E., Hakansson, L. D., Tran, P.-K., Knutson, F., Malinski, T. & Borowiec, J. (2014). Effect of Glyceryl Trinitrate on Staphylococcus aureus Growth and Leukocyte Activation during Simulated Extracorporeal Circulation. The thoracic and cardiovascular surgeon, 62(5), 402-408
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effect of Glyceryl Trinitrate on Staphylococcus aureus Growth and Leukocyte Activation during Simulated Extracorporeal Circulation
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2014 (English)In: The thoracic and cardiovascular surgeon, ISSN 0171-6425, E-ISSN 1439-1902, Vol. 62, no 5, p. 402-408Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background Previously, nitric oxide has been shown to possess antimicrobial effects. In this study, we aim to test the effect of glyceryl trinitrate (GTN) on Staphylococcus aureus growth during simulated extracorporeal circulation (SECC) and also to examine the effect of S. aureus, alone and in combination with GTN, on activation markers of the innate immune system during SECC. Methods In an in vitro system of SECC, we measured GTN-induced changes in markers of leukocyte activation in whole blood caused by S. aureus infestation, as well as the effect of GTN on S. aureus growth. Results GTN had no effect on S. aureus growth after 240 minutes SECC. Staphylococcus aureus reduced the expression of granulocyte Fc gamma-receptor CD32 but stimulated the expression of monocyte CD32. Staphylococcus aureus stimulated expression of some leukocyte adhesion key proteins, activation marker CD66b, lipopolysaccharide-receptor CD14, and C3b-receptor CD35. Staphylococcus aureus and GTN addition induced significant increases in monocyte CD63 (lysosomal granule protein) levels. Conclusion GTN does not affect S. aureus growth during SECC and has no effect on SECC-induced leukocyte activation.

Keywords
glyceryl trinitrate, Staphylococcus aureus, simulated extracorporeal circulation, postoperative infection, cardiac surgery
National Category
Surgery Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-232653 (URN)10.1055/s-0033-1363296 (DOI)000340748500005 ()
Available from: 2014-09-24 Created: 2014-09-22 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Tano, E. & Melhus, Å. (2014). Level of decontamination after washing textiles at 60°C or 70°C followed by tumble drying. Infection Ecology & Epidemiology, 4, Article ID 24314.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Level of decontamination after washing textiles at 60°C or 70°C followed by tumble drying
2014 (English)In: Infection Ecology & Epidemiology, ISSN 2000-8686, E-ISSN 2000-8686, Vol. 4, article id 24314Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Several major outbreaks in healthcare facilities have occurred with the emergence of multi-resistant bacteria. A possible route for dissemination is the hospital textiles and inadequate laundering of them. The aim of this study was to develop an easy-to-use method for simulating the laundering process of hospital textiles, and thereafter apply the method when evaluating the decontaminating efficacy of two different washing temperatures.

METHODS: The laundering process, including tumble drying, took place at two professional laundries. Enterococcus faecium was used as bioindicator.

RESULTS: The results showed that a lowering of the washing temperature from 70°C to 60°C did not affect the decontamination efficacy; the washing cycle alone reduced the number of bacteria with 3-5 log10 CFU, whereas the following tumble drying reduced the bacterial numbers with another 3-4 log10 CFU, yielding the same final result independent of washing temperature. Without tumble drying, there was an obvious risk of adding non-fermenting gram-negative bacteria to the fabric. These bacteria originated from the washing cycle.

CONCLUSION: A simple method to simulate hospital laundering was developed. To save energy, it is possible to use a washing temperature of 60°C, but the washing cycle should be followed by tumble drying, and the whole laundering process needs to be monitored to maintain sufficient textile hygiene.

National Category
Other Medical Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-246138 (URN)10.3402/iee.v4.24314 (DOI)25413829 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2015-03-02 Created: 2015-03-02 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
Sütterlin, S., Tano, E., Bergsten, A., Tallberg, A.-B. & Melhus, Å. (2012). Effects of Silver-based Wound Dressings on the Bacterial Flora in Chronic Leg Ulcers and Its Susceptibility In vitro to Silver. Acta Dermato-Venereologica, 92(1), 34-39
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of Silver-based Wound Dressings on the Bacterial Flora in Chronic Leg Ulcers and Its Susceptibility In vitro to Silver
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2012 (English)In: Acta Dermato-Venereologica, ISSN 0001-5555, E-ISSN 1651-2057, Vol. 92, no 1, p. 34-39Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Silver-based dressings have been used extensively in wound management in recent years, but data on their antimicrobial activity in the clinical setting are limited. In order to explore their effects on chronic leg ulcer flora, 14 ulcers were cultured after at least 3 weeks treatment with Aquacel Ag (R) or Acticoat (R). Phenotypic and genetic silver resistance were investigated in a total of 56 isolates. Silver-based dressings had a limited effect on primary wound pathogens, which were present in 79% of the cultures before, and 71% after, treatment. One silver-resistant Enterobacter cloacae strain was identified (silver nitrate minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC)>512 mg/l, positive for silE, silS and silP). Further studies in vitro showed that inducible silver-resistance was more frequent in Enterobacteriaceae with cephalosporin-resistance and that silver nitrate had mainly a bacteriostatic effect on Staphylococcus aureus. Monitoring of silver resistance should be considered in areas where silver is used extensively.

Keywords
silver, silver-resistance, wound dressing, ESBL, derepressed mutant
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-171444 (URN)10.2340/00015555-1170 (DOI)000300388400007 ()
Available from: 2012-03-19 Created: 2012-03-19 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
Tano, E. & Melhus, Å. (2011). Evaluation of three swab transport systems for the maintenance of clinically important bacteria in simulated mono- and polymicrobial samples. Acta Pathologica, Microbiologica et Immunologica Scandinavica (APMIS), 119(3), 198-203
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Evaluation of three swab transport systems for the maintenance of clinically important bacteria in simulated mono- and polymicrobial samples
2011 (English)In: Acta Pathologica, Microbiologica et Immunologica Scandinavica (APMIS), ISSN 0903-4641, E-ISSN 1600-0463, Vol. 119, no 3, p. 198-203Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this study, three swab transport systems were evaluated: M40 Transystem, Amies broth with a relatively new type of swab (both Copan Diagnostics, Corona, CA, USA), and SSI transportmedium (Statens Serum Institut, Copenhagen Denmark). The CLSI M40-A standard procedures and 11 culture collection strains were used. The transport systems were tested at room temperature for holding times of 0, 24, and 48 h, and both mono- and polymicrobial samples were included. After 24 h of simulated transportation, all systems were able to maintain the viability of all organisms tested. SSI transportmedium exhibited the lowest maintaining ability, whereas the two Copan systems were the most growth-promoting system. In polymicrobial samples, this latter feature was a problem. At 48 h, no transport system could maintain the viability of all strains, and the recovery rates differed depending on organism and device. The species most difficult to recover in all the three systems was Neisseria gonorrhoeae. When selecting a swab transport system, consideration must be given to the sample type, the conditions that prevail locally, and the performance in the clinical setting.

Keywords
Transportation, swab, fastidious bacteria, polymicrobial samples, Neisseria gonorrhoeae
National Category
Clinical Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-149062 (URN)10.1111/j.1600-0463.2010.02710.x (DOI)000286838400005 ()21284737 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2011-03-15 Created: 2011-03-15 Last updated: 2017-12-11Bibliographically approved
Melki, V., Tran, P., Tano, E., Knutson, F. & Borowiec, J. W. (2010). Enhanced growth of Staphylococcus aureus after nitric oxide supplementation during simulated extracorporeal circulation. The thoracic and cardiovascular surgeon, 58(2), 81-85
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Enhanced growth of Staphylococcus aureus after nitric oxide supplementation during simulated extracorporeal circulation
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2010 (English)In: The thoracic and cardiovascular surgeon, ISSN 0171-6425, E-ISSN 1439-1902, Vol. 58, no 2, p. 81-85Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Several factors contribute to postoperative bacterial infections in cardiac surgery. Long operation times and the use of extracorporeal circulation increase the risk of infection. Nitric oxide has been shown to possess a broad spectrum antimicrobial effect. Methods: In this study, we investigated the effect of nitric oxide on S. aureus growth in whole blood during simulated extracorporeal circulation. Results: S. aureus growth increased 6.2-fold after 180 min SECC in the presence of nitric oxide. Leukocyte counts remained unchanged without any differences between the groups. We observed a steady increase in markers of oxidative stress and activity of the innate immune system. Myeloperoxidase levels increased 8-fold, and C3a and terminal complement complex by 2-fold after 180 min. Conclusion: S. aureus growth is not due to the effect of nitric oxide on the innate immune system but from its effect on the bacteria itself. It has been shown that nitric oxide stimulates the expression of inducible lactate dehydrogenase, specific to S. aureus, which improves its resistance to oxidative stress, and may give S. aureus a survival advantage resulting in increased growth.

National Category
Surgery
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-298778 (URN)10.1055/s-0029-1186135 (DOI)
Available from: 2016-07-07 Created: 2016-07-07 Last updated: 2017-05-18Bibliographically approved
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