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Le Grevès, Madeleine
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Publications (5 of 5) Show all publications
Chapman, C. D., Nilsson, V. C., Thune, H. A., Cedernaes, J., Le Greves, M., Hogenkamp, P. S., . . . Schiöth, H. B. (2014). Watching TV and Food Intake: The Role of Content. PLoS ONE, 9(7), e100602
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Watching TV and Food Intake: The Role of Content
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2014 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 9, no 7, p. e100602-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Obesity is a serious and growing health concern worldwide. Watching television (TV) represents a condition during which many habitually eat, irrespective of hunger level. However, as of yet, little is known about how the content of television programs being watched differentially impacts concurrent eating behavior. In this study, eighteen normal-weight female students participated in three counter-balanced experimental conditions, including a 'Boring' TV condition (art lecture), an 'Engaging' TV condition (Swedish TV comedy series), and a no TV control condition during which participants read (a text on insects living in Sweden). Throughout each condition participants had access to both high-calorie (M&Ms) and low-calorie (grapes) snacks. We found that, relative to the Engaging TV condition, Boring TV encouraged excessive eating (+52% g, P = 0.009). Additionally, the Engaging TV condition actually resulted in significantly less concurrent intake relative to the control 'Text' condition (235% g, P = 0.05). This intake was driven almost entirely by the healthy snack, grapes; however, this interaction did not reach significance (P = 0.07). Finally, there was a significant correlation between how bored participants were across all conditions, and their concurrent food intake (beta = 0.317, P = 0.02). Intake as measured by kcals was similarly patterned but did not reach significance. These results suggest that, for women, different TV programs elicit different levels of concurrent food intake, and that the degree to which a program is engaging (or alternately, boring) is related to that intake. Additionally, they suggest that emotional content (e. g. boring vs. engaging) may be more associated than modality (e. g. TV vs. text) with concurrent intake.

National Category
Neurosciences Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-231327 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0100602 (DOI)000339635000033 ()24983245 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2014-09-07 Created: 2014-09-07 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved
Benedict, C., Brooks, S. J., Kullberg, J., Nordenskjöld, R., Burgos, J., Le Grevès, M., . . . Schiöth, H. B. (2013). Association between physical activity and brain health in older adults. Neurobiology of Aging, 34(1), 83-90
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Association between physical activity and brain health in older adults
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2013 (English)In: Neurobiology of Aging, ISSN 0197-4580, E-ISSN 1558-1497, Vol. 34, no 1, p. 83-90Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In the present cross-sectional study, we examined physical activity (PA) and its possible association with cognitive skills and brain structure in 331 cognitively healthy elderly. Based on the number of self-reported light and hard activities for at least 30 minutes per week, participants were assigned to 4 groups representing different levels of PA. The cognitive skills were assessed by the Mini Mental State Examination score, a verbal fluency task, and the Trail-making test as a measure of visuospatial orientation ability. Participants also underwent a magnetic resonance imaging of the brain. Multiple regression analysis revealed that greater PA was associated with a shorter time to complete the Trail-making test, and higher levels of verbal fluency. Further, the level of self-reported PA was positively correlated with brain volume, white matter, as well as a parietal lobe gray matter volume, situated bilaterally at the precuneus. These present cross-sectional results indicate that PA is a lifestyle factor that is linked to brain structure and function in late life.

National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-181182 (URN)10.1016/j.neurobiolaging.2012.04.013 (DOI)000311026700007 ()22592017 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2012-09-18 Created: 2012-09-18 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
Mitra, A., Klockars, A., Gosnell, B. A., Le Grevés, M., Olszewski, P. K., Levine, A. S. & Schiöth, H. B. (2012). Expression levels of genes encoding melanin concentrating hormone (MCH) and MCH receptor change in taste aversion, but MCH injections do not alleviate aversive responses. Pharmacology, Biochemistry and Behavior, 100(3), 581-586
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Expression levels of genes encoding melanin concentrating hormone (MCH) and MCH receptor change in taste aversion, but MCH injections do not alleviate aversive responses
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2012 (English)In: Pharmacology, Biochemistry and Behavior, ISSN 0091-3057, E-ISSN 1873-5177, Vol. 100, no 3, p. 581-586Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Melanin concentrating hormone (MCH) stimulates feeding driven by energy needs and reward and modifies anxiety behavior. Orexigenic peptides of similar characteristics, including nociceptin/orphanin FQ Agouti-related protein and opioids, increase consumption also by reducing avoidance of potentially tainted food in animals displaying a conditioned taste aversion (CTA). Herein, using real-time PCR, we assessed whether expression levels of genes encoding MCH and its receptor, MCHR1, were affected in CTA in the rat. We also investigated whet her injecting MCH intracerebroventricularly (ICV) during the acquisition and retrieval of LiCl-induced CTA, would alleviate aversive responses. MCHR1 gene was upregulated in the hypothalamus and brain stem of aversive animals. MCH mRNA was significantly higher in the hypothalamus, whereas a strong trend suggesting upregulation of MCH and MCHR1 genes was detected in the amygdala. Despite these expression changes associated with aversion, MCH injected prior to the induction of CTA with LiCl as well as later, during the CTA retrieval upon subsequent presentations of the aversive tastant, did not reduce the magnitude of CTA. We conclude that MCH and its receptor form an orexigenic system whose expression is affected in CTA. This altered MCH expression may contribute to tastant-targeted hypophagia in CTA. However, changing the MCH tone in the brain by exogenous peptide was insufficient to prevent the onset or facilitate extinction of Lid-induced CTA. This designates MCH as one of many accessory molecules associated with shaping an aversive response, but not a critical one for LiCl-dependent CFA to occur.

Keywords
Feeding, Preference, Avoidance, Anorexia
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-169983 (URN)10.1016/j.pbb.2011.08.009 (DOI)000300074800033 ()
Available from: 2012-03-08 Created: 2012-03-07 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
Le Grevès, M., Le Grevès, P. & Nyberg, F. (2005). Age-related effects of IGF-1 on the NMDA-, GH- and IGF-1 receptor mRNA transcripts in the rat hippocampus. Brain Research Bulletin, 65(5), 369-374
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Age-related effects of IGF-1 on the NMDA-, GH- and IGF-1 receptor mRNA transcripts in the rat hippocampus
2005 (English)In: Brain Research Bulletin, ISSN 0361-9230, E-ISSN 1873-2747, Vol. 65, no 5, p. 369-374Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and growth hormone (GH) have been suggested to promote memory and cognitive capabilities. In a recent publication we observed that GH increase the proportion of the NR2B subunit mRNA transcript of the NMDA receptor in rat hippocampus. NR2B has been suggested to be essential for spatial learning and long-term potentiation (LTP). This effect of GH might be IGF-1-mediated or a result of a co-ordination with IGF-1. To test this hypothesis further, we examined the effects of 10 daily s.c. injections of IGF-1 on NMDA receptor subunits (NR1, NR2A, and NR2B), GH receptor (GHR), GH binding protein (GHBP) and type 1 IGF receptor (IGF-1R) gene transcripts in the hippocampus. The NR2B subunit mRNA increased in young (11 weeks) but not in older (14-16 months) rats and the expression of the NR2A mRNA was decreased in both groups. The ratio of NR2B to NR2A is suggested to mirror the potential for synaptic plasticity. In both age groups, IGF-1 treatment resulted in a significant increase of this ratio at transcription level. The GHR mRNA increased in young rats, mimicking the effect of GH, while the IGF-1R mRNA was decreased in the older group of rats after IGF-1 treatment. These results suggest that IGF-1 in many aspects may mediate the actions earlier shown for GH.

National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-92532 (URN)10.1016/j.brainresbull.2005.01.012 (DOI)15833590 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2005-01-20 Created: 2005-01-20 Last updated: 2017-12-14Bibliographically approved
Kastrup, Y., Le Grevès, M., Nyberg, F. & Blomqvist, A. (2004). Distribution of growth hormone receptor mRNA in the brain stem and spinal cord of the rat. Neuroscience, 130(2), 419-425
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Distribution of growth hormone receptor mRNA in the brain stem and spinal cord of the rat
2004 (English)In: Neuroscience, ISSN 0306-4522, E-ISSN 1873-7544, Vol. 130, no 2, p. 419-425Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

By using in situ hybridization histochemistry the distribution of growth hormone (GH) receptor mRNA was examined in the rat brain stem and spinal cord. Dense labeling was seen in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus, as reported previously, but also in several other areas, including the locus coeruleus, the area postrema, and the commissural part of the nucleus of the solitary tract. Other labeled structures included the superior lateral parabrachial nucleus, the facial, hypoglossal and trigeminal motor nuclei, the nucleus incertus, the dorsal tegmental nucleus, the dorsal raphe nucleus, the nucleus of the trapezoid body, and the superficial layers of the dorsal horn of the spinal cord. These findings provide support for a direct action of GH on brain regions involved in various aspects of homeostatic control. Thus, the distribution of GH receptor mRNA to visceral sensory and motor structures is consonant with a role of GH in the regulation of food intake and energy homeostasis. Its presence in the superficial dorsal horn of the spinal cord indicates a role for GH in the initial processing of fine afferent input, and may help explain the beneficial effects of GH replacement in certain unclear pain conditions.

Keywords
Animals, Appetite Regulation/physiology, Arcuate Nucleus/cytology/metabolism, Area Postrema/cytology/metabolism, Brain Stem/anatomy & histology/*metabolism, Energy Metabolism/physiology, Growth Hormone/*metabolism, Locus Coeruleus/cytology/metabolism, Male, Neurons/*metabolism, Pain/metabolism/physiopathology, RNA; Messenger/*metabolism, Rats, Rats; Sprague-Dawley, Receptors; Somatotropin/*genetics, Research Support; Non-U.S. Gov't, Solitary Nucleus/cytology/metabolism, Spinal Cord/anatomy & histology/*metabolism
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-92529 (URN)10.1016/j.neuroscience.2004.10.003 (DOI)15664698 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2005-01-20 Created: 2005-01-20 Last updated: 2017-12-14Bibliographically approved
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