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Bendre, M., Granholm, L., Drennan, R., Meyer, A., Yan, L., Nilsson, K. W., . . . Comasco, E. (2019). Early life stress and voluntary alcohol consumption in relation to Maoa methylation in male rats.. Alcohol, 79, 7-16
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Early life stress and voluntary alcohol consumption in relation to Maoa methylation in male rats.
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2019 (English)In: Alcohol, ISSN 0741-8329, E-ISSN 1873-6823, Vol. 79, p. 7-16Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Early life stress (ELS) or alcohol consumption can influence DNA methylation and affect gene expression. The monoamine oxidase A (Maoa) encodes the enzyme that metabolizes monoaminergic neurotransmitters crucial for the stress response, alcohol reward, and reinforcement. Previously, we reported lower Maoa expression in the nucleus accumbens and dorsal striatum of male rats exposed to ELS during the first three postnatal weeks, and to voluntary alcohol consumption in adulthood, compared with controls. The present study continued to investigate the effect of ELS and alcohol consumption on Maoa methylation, and its relation to Maoa expression in these animals. We selected candidate CpGs after performing next-generation bisulfite sequencing of the Maoa promoter, intron 1-5, exons 5 and 6, together comprised of 107 CpGs, in a subgroup of rats. Pyrosequencing was used to analyse the methylation of ten candidate CpGs in the promoter and intron 1 in the entire sample. ELS and alcohol displayed an interaction effect on CpG-specific methylation in the dorsal striatum. CpG-specific methylation correlated with Maoa expression, corticosterone levels, and alcohol consumption in a brain region-specific manner. CpG-specific methylation in the Maoa promoter was a potential moderator of the interaction of ELS with alcohol consumption on Maoa expression in the NAc. However, the findings were sparse, did not survive correction for multiple testing, and the magnitude of differences in methylation levels was small. In conclusion, CpG-specific Maoa methylation in the promoter and intron 1 may associate with ELS, alcohol consumption and Maoa expression in reward-related brain regions.

Keywords
Alcohol, DNA methylation, Gene expression, Maoa, Maternal separation, Stress
National Category
Psychiatry Neurosciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-368636 (URN)10.1016/j.alcohol.2018.11.001 (DOI)000483450600002 ()30414913 (PubMedID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2011-0627Fredrik och Ingrid Thurings StiftelseLars Hierta Memorial FoundationThe Swedish Brain Foundation, PS2013-0052Swedish Research Council, K2012-61X-22090-01-3Swedish Research Council, VR: 2015-00495EU, FP7, Seventh Framework Programme, INCA 600398Science for Life Laboratory - a national resource center for high-throughput molecular bioscience
Available from: 2018-12-06 Created: 2018-12-06 Last updated: 2019-10-17Bibliographically approved
Ghosh, E., Nilsson, K. W. & Isaksson, J. (2019). Own-gender bias in school staff's recognition of children with ADHD. Acta Paediatrica, 108(6), 1165-1166
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Own-gender bias in school staff's recognition of children with ADHD
2019 (English)In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 108, no 6, p. 1165-1166Article in journal, Editorial material (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by impairments in attention, hyperactivity and impulsivity. A higher proportion of boys than girls are diagnosed with ADHD, although girls seek care for ADHD at an older age, and almost to the same extent as men by adulthood (1). The sex difference in prevalence rates during childhood may hypothetically reflect a bias in referral patterns, where adults perceive and value girls' symptoms differently to boys' symptoms. Consistent with this finding, the gender bias is attenuated when self-reports and community-based samples are used (1).

National Category
Psychiatry
Research subject
Child and Youth Psychiatry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-376618 (URN)10.1111/apa.14738 (DOI)000467867900031 ()30715763 (PubMedID)
Funder
The Swedish Brain Foundation
Available from: 2019-02-07 Created: 2019-02-07 Last updated: 2019-06-19Bibliographically approved
Larm, P., Raninen, J., Åslund, C., Svensson, J. & Nilsson, K. W. (2019). The increased trend of non-drinking alcohol among adolescents: what role do internet activities have?. European Journal of Public Health, 29(1), 27-32
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The increased trend of non-drinking alcohol among adolescents: what role do internet activities have?
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2019 (English)In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 29, no 1, p. 27-32Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Recently, an increased trend toward non-drinking among adolescents has been observed in several countries. The aim of the present study is to evaluate a common suggestion in literature, that adolescents do not drink alcohol because they spend more time on the internet, monitored at home, by examining associations between internet activities (social media/chatting and computer gaming) and non-drinking.

Methods: A health questionnaire was distributed to all 9th graders (1516 years) in a mid-sized Swedish county in 2008, 2010 and 2012. In total, 7089 students returned the questionnaire.

Results: In contrast to the suggestion, no association was found between total time spent on computers and non-drinking. Social media/chatting was robustly associated with a decreased probability of non-drinking across the three survey years. On the other hand, computer gaming during weekends only (OR = 1.74, CI = 1.132.69) or both on weekdays and weekends increased the probability of non-drinking (OR = 1.82, CI = 1.312.54) in 2012 only. However, neither social media/chatting nor computer gaming was associated with the increased trend of non-drinking from 2008 to 2012.

Conclusions: Internet activities were in general not associated with non-drinking among adolescents aged 1516 years in Sweden. Although, a weak positive association between computer gaming and non-drinking was found in 2012, this effect benefited the vast majority of the boys. The larger alcohol use among those with extensive social media use/chatting may indicate that these online platforms are arenas where adolescents are exposed for positive alcohol preferences and alcohol advertising without parental supervision.

National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-381843 (URN)10.1093/eurpub/cky168 (DOI)000462576700007 ()30169631 (PubMedID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2015-00857
Available from: 2019-04-15 Created: 2019-04-15 Last updated: 2019-04-15Bibliographically approved
Vrettou, M., Nilsson, K. W., Tuvblad, C., Rehn, M., Åslund, C., Andershed, A.-K., . . . Comasco, E. (2019). VGLUT2 rs2290045 genotype moderates environmental sensitivity to alcohol-related problems in three samples of youths. European Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 28(10), 1329-1340
Open this publication in new window or tab >>VGLUT2 rs2290045 genotype moderates environmental sensitivity to alcohol-related problems in three samples of youths
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2019 (English)In: European Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, ISSN 1018-8827, E-ISSN 1435-165X, Vol. 28, no 10, p. 1329-1340Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The importance of Vesicular Glutamate Transporter 2 (VGLUT2)-mediated neurotransmission has been highlighted in studies on addiction-related phenotypes. The single nucleotide polymorphism rs2290045 in VGLUT2 has been associated with alcohol dependence, but it is unknown whether or how this association is affected by environmental factors. The present study determined whether the association of alcohol-related problems with the rs2290045 in the VGLUT2 gene was modified by negative and positive environmental factors. Three samples were included: a clinical sample of 131 adolescents followed from age 17 to 22; a general population sample of 1794 young adults; and a general population sample of 1687 adolescents followed from age 14 to 17. DNA was extracted from saliva and the rs2290045 (T/C) was genotyped. Alcohol-related problems were assessed using the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test. Stressful life events (SLE) and parenting were assessed by questionnaires. Gene-environment interactions were investigated using a dual statistical approach. In all samples (effect sizes 0.6-6.2%), and consistent with the differential susceptibility framework, T carriers exposed to SLE reported more alcohol-related problems if they had experienced poor parenting, and lower alcohol-related problems if they had received supportive parenting. T carriers not exposed to SLE reported higher alcohol-related problems if they had received supportive parenting and lower alcohol-related problems if they had received poor parenting. Among CC carriers, alcohol-related problems did not vary as a function of negative and positive environmental factors. In conclusion, in three samples of youths, alcohol-related problems were associated with an interaction of VGLUT2 rs2290045, SLE, and parenting.

Keywords
Adolescents, Alcohol, Gene, Glutamate, Stress, VGLUT2
National Category
Psychiatry Medical Genetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-381816 (URN)10.1007/s00787-019-01293-w (DOI)000489301800006 ()30805764 (PubMedID)
Funder
The Swedish Brain Foundation, PS2013-0052Åke Wiberg Foundation, M15-0239Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2015-00897Swedish Research Council, 2013-4657Swedish Research Council, 2014-3804Swedish Research Council, VR: 2015-00495
Available from: 2019-04-15 Created: 2019-04-15 Last updated: 2019-11-06Bibliographically approved
Vadlin, S., Åslund, C. & Nillson, K. W. (2018). A longitudinal study of the individual- and group-level problematic gaming and associations with problem gambling among Swedish adolescents. Brain and Behavior, 8(4), Article ID e00949.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A longitudinal study of the individual- and group-level problematic gaming and associations with problem gambling among Swedish adolescents
2018 (English)In: Brain and Behavior, ISSN 2162-3279, E-ISSN 2162-3279, Vol. 8, no 4, article id e00949Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim:  The aims of the present study were to investigate the long-term stability of problematic gaming among adolescents and whether problematic gaming at wave 1 (W1) was associated with problem gambling at wave 2 (W2), three years later.

Methods:  Data from the SALVe cohort, including adolescents in Västmanland born in 1997 and 1999, were accessed and analyzed in two waves W2, N = 1576; 914 (58%) girls). At W1 the adolescents were 13 and 15 years old, and at W2 they were 16 and 18 years old. Adolescents self-rated on the Gaming Addiction Identification Test (GAIT), Problem Gambling Severity Index (PGSI), and gambling frequencies. Stability of gaming was determined using Gamma correlation, Spearman’s rho, and McNemar. Logistic regression analysis and General linear model (GLM) analysis were performed and adjusted for sex, age, and ethnicity, frequency of gambling activities and gaming time at W1, with PGSI as the dependent variable, and GAIT as the independent variable, to investigate associations between problematic gaming and problem gambling.

Results:  Problematic gaming was relative stable over time, g = 0.739, P £ 0.001, r = 0.555, P £ 0.001, and McNemar P £ 0.001. Furthermore, problematic gaming at W1 increased the probability of having problem gambling three years later, logistic regression OR = 1.886 (95% CI 1.125-3.161), P = 0.016, GLM F = 10.588, h2 = 0.007, P = 0.001.  

Conclusions: Problematic gaming seems to be relatively stable over time. Although associations between problematic gaming and later problem gambling were found, the low explained variance indicate that problematic gaming in an unlikely predictor for problem gambling within this sample.

Keywords
Adolescence, behavioral addiction, comorbidity, gaming problems, gambling problems
National Category
Substance Abuse Psychology
Research subject
Psychiatry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-352513 (URN)10.1002/brb3.949 (DOI)000429700300014 ()
Projects
SALVe Cohort
Funder
Fredrik och Ingrid Thurings StiftelseForte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2015-00897Åke Wiberg Foundation, M15-0239
Available from: 2018-06-05 Created: 2018-06-05 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Larm, P., Åslund, C., Raninen, J. & Nilsson, K. W. (2018). Adolescent non-drinkers: Who are they? Social relations, school performance, lifestyle factors and health behaviours. Drug and Alcohol Review, 37(S1), S67-S75
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Adolescent non-drinkers: Who are they? Social relations, school performance, lifestyle factors and health behaviours
2018 (English)In: Drug and Alcohol Review, ISSN 0959-5236, E-ISSN 1465-3362, Vol. 37, no S1, p. S67-S75Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction and Aims

Traditionally, non-drinking adults or young adults have been associated with health deficits rather than health benefits. However, as the proportion of Swedish non-drinking adolescents has doubled since 2000, their health profiles are of interest. The aim of the present study is to examine whether social relations, school characteristics, lifestyle factors or health behaviours distinguish adolescent non-drinkers from adolescent drinkers, and if their health profiles have changed from 2004 to 2012.

Design and Methods

Data from the Survey of Adolescent Life in Vestmanland, a health survey biennially distributed to all 9th graders (15-16years) in a medium-sized Swedish county, was used. In total, 2872 students in 2004 and 2045 students in 2012 were included.

Results

Non-drinkers were distinguished from drinkers in both 2004 and 2012 by elevated parental supervision, a lower rate of school truancy and lower rates of cannabis use, use of other illicit drugs, daily smoking and lower scores on antisocial behaviour, but more problems of getting new friends. No differences between 2004 and 2012 were found.

Discussion and Conclusions

Non-drinkers presented more adaptive and healthier behaviours than their drinking peers, but it is difficult to determine whether their health benefits were related to their improved alcohol status or to the more general trend towards adaptation that occurred from 2004 to 2012 among adolescents.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
WILEY, 2018
Keywords
adolescence, alcohol, non-drinkers, health
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-356810 (URN)10.1111/dar.12640 (DOI)000431986800009 ()29218748 (PubMedID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2015-00857Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2015-00897Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and WelfareThe Swedish Brain Foundation
Available from: 2018-08-16 Created: 2018-08-16 Last updated: 2018-08-16Bibliographically approved
Bendre, M., Comasco, E., Checknita, D., Tiihonen, J., Hodgins, S. & Nillson, K. W. (2018). Associations Between MAOA-uVNTR Genotype, Maltreatment, MAOA Methylation, and Alcohol Consumption in Young Adult Males. Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research, 42(3), 508-519
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Associations Between MAOA-uVNTR Genotype, Maltreatment, MAOA Methylation, and Alcohol Consumption in Young Adult Males
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2018 (English)In: Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research, ISSN 0145-6008, E-ISSN 1530-0277, Vol. 42, no 3, p. 508-519Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background

Epigenetic mechanisms are candidate moderators of the effect of maltreatment on brain and behavior. Interactions between maltreatment and the monoamine oxidase A upstream variable number tandem repeat genotype (MAOA-uVNTR) are associated with alcohol-related problems. However, presently it is not known whether DNA methylation moderates this association. The study focused on 53 young adult males and aimed to determine whether MAOA methylation moderated the association of alcohol-related problems with the interaction of MAOA-uVNTR and maltreatment, and whether alcohol consumption moderated the association of MAOA methylation with the interaction of MAOA-uVNTR and maltreatment.

Methods

MAOA-uVNTR genotypes with 3 and > 3 repeats were categorized as short (S) and long (L), respectively. Data on maltreatment were obtained retrospectively, using self-reported questionnaires. DNA methylation of 16 candidate CpGs within part of the MAOA first exon and intron was assessed and grouped based on principal component analyses. Alcohol-related problems were assessed using the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT). Alcohol consumption was measured using AUDIT-C. Moderation effects were assessed and probed using the moderated moderation model and Johnson-Neyman's method, respectively.

Results

Carriers of the S allele, who experienced maltreatment and displayed lower Component 1 (mean of CpGs 13-16 in the first intron) MAOA methylation levels, reported higher AUDIT score in contrast to L-allele carriers. Carriers of the S allele, who reported higher AUDIT-C score and experienced maltreatment, displayed lower Component 3 (mean of CpGs 2-6 in the first exon) MAOA methylation levels than L-allele carriers.

Conclusions

Intronic methylation moderated the association of alcohol-related problems with the interaction of MAOA-uVNTR and maltreatment. Alcohol consumption moderated the association of exonic methylation with the interaction of MAOA-uVNTR and maltreatment. These results suggest that epigenetic factors as well as genotype and maltreatment play a role in the development of alcohol misuse among young adult males.

Keywords
Alcohol, DNA Methylation, Gene by Environment, MAOA-, uVNTR, Maltreatment
National Category
Psychiatry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-351264 (URN)10.1111/acer.13578 (DOI)000426489600005 ()29222910 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, VR: 2015-00495
Available from: 2018-06-11 Created: 2018-06-11 Last updated: 2019-10-08Bibliographically approved
Checknita, D., Ekström, T. J., Comasco, E., Nilsson, K. W., Tiihonen, J. & Hodgins, S. (2018). Associations of monoamine oxidase A gene first exon methylation with sexual abuse and current depression in women. Journal of neural transmission, 125(7), 1053-1064
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Associations of monoamine oxidase A gene first exon methylation with sexual abuse and current depression in women
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2018 (English)In: Journal of neural transmission, ISSN 0300-9564, E-ISSN 1435-1463, Vol. 125, no 7, p. 1053-1064Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Childhood physical abuse (PA) and sexual abuse (SA) interact with monoamine oxidase A (MAOA) gene polymorphism to modify risk for mental disorders. In addition, PA and SA may alter gene activity through epigenetic mechanisms such as DNA methylation, thereby further modifying risk for disorders. We investigated whether methylation in a region spanning the MAOA first exon and part of the first intron was associated with PA and/or SA, MAOA genotype, alcohol dependence, drug dependence, depression disorders, anxiety disorders, and conduct disorder. 114 Swedish women completed standardized diagnostic interviews and questionnaires to report PA and SA, and provided saliva samples for DNA extraction. DNA was genotyped for MAOA-uVNTR polymorphisms, and methylation of a MAOA region of interest (chrX: 43,515,544-43,515,991) was measured. SA, not PA, was associated with hypermethylation of the MAOA first exon relative to no-abuse, and the association was robust to adjustment for psychoactive medication, alcohol and drug dependence, and current substance use. SA and MAOA-uVNTR genotype, but not their interaction, was associated with MAOA methylation. SA associated with all measured mental disorders. Hypermethylation of MAOA first exon mediated the association of SA with current depression, and both methylation levels and SA independently predicted lifetime depression. Much remains to be learned about the independent effects of SA and MAOA-uVNTR genotypes on methylation of the MAOA first exon.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
SPRINGER WIEN, 2018
Keywords
Child abuse, Depression, Epigenetics, Gene-environment interaction methylation, Women
National Category
Psychiatry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-358274 (URN)10.1007/s00702-018-1875-3 (DOI)000435405600006 ()29600412 (PubMedID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and WelfareStockholm County CouncilThe Karolinska Institutet's Research Foundation
Available from: 2018-08-30 Created: 2018-08-30 Last updated: 2018-08-30Bibliographically approved
Culverhouse, R. C., Saccone, N. L., Horton, A. C., Ma, Y., Anstey, K. J., Banaschewski, T., . . . Bierut, L. J. (2018). Collaborative meta-analysis finds no evidence of a strong interaction between stress and 5-HTTLPR genotype contributing to the development of depression. Molecular Psychiatry, 23(1), 133-142
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Collaborative meta-analysis finds no evidence of a strong interaction between stress and 5-HTTLPR genotype contributing to the development of depression
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2018 (English)In: Molecular Psychiatry, ISSN 1359-4184, E-ISSN 1476-5578, Vol. 23, no 1, p. 133-142Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The hypothesis that the S allele of the 5-HTTLPR serotonin transporter promoter region is associated with increased risk of depression, but only in individuals exposed to stressful situations, has generated much interest, research and controversy since first proposed in 2003. Multiple meta-analyses combining results from heterogeneous analyses have not settled the issue. To determine the magnitude of the interaction and the conditions under which it might be observed, we performed new analyses on 31 data sets containing 38 802 European ancestry subjects genotyped for 5-HTTLPR and assessed for depression and childhood maltreatment or other stressful life events, and meta-analysed the results. Analyses targeted two stressors (narrow, broad) and two depression outcomes (current, lifetime). All groups that published on this topic prior to the initiation of our study and met the assessment and sample size criteria were invited to participate. Additional groups, identified by consortium members or self-identified in response to our protocol (published prior to the start of analysis) with qualifying unpublished data, were also invited to participate. A uniform data analysis script implementing the protocol was executed by each of the consortium members. Our findings do not support the interaction hypothesis. We found no subgroups or variable definitions for which an interaction between stress and 5-HTTLPR genotype was statistically significant. In contrast, our findings for the main effects of life stressors (strong risk factor) and 5-HTTLPR genotype (no impact on risk) are strikingly consistent across our contributing studies, the original study reporting the interaction and subsequent meta-analyses. Our conclusion is that if an interaction exists in which the S allele of 5-HTTLPR increases risk of depression only in stressed individuals, then it is not broadly generalisable, but must be of modest effect size and only observable in limited situations.

National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health Psychiatry Neurology Neurosciences Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-346381 (URN)10.1038/mp.2017.44 (DOI)000423441000016 ()28373689 (PubMedID)
Funder
Wellcome trust, 102215/2/13/2German Research Foundation (DFG), LA 733/2-1; DA1151/5-1NIH (National Institute of Health), R01 AA07065; NIH R01; HD042157-01A1; MH081802; 1RC2 MH089951; 1RC2 MH089995EU, European Research Council, EU-FP7HEALTH-F2-2008-222963Åke Wiberg Foundation, M15-0239European Science Foundation (ESF)
Available from: 2018-03-23 Created: 2018-03-23 Last updated: 2018-03-23Bibliographically approved
Pettersson, R., Söderström, S. & Nilsson, K. W. (2018). Diagnosing ADHD in Adults: An Examination of the Discriminative Validity of Neuropsychological Tests and Diagnostic Assessment Instruments. Journal of Attention Disorders, 22(11), 1019-1031
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Diagnosing ADHD in Adults: An Examination of the Discriminative Validity of Neuropsychological Tests and Diagnostic Assessment Instruments
2018 (English)In: Journal of Attention Disorders, ISSN 1087-0547, E-ISSN 1557-1246, Vol. 22, no 11, p. 1019-1031Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study is to investigate the discriminative validity of neuropsychological tests and diagnostic assessment instruments in diagnosing adult ADHD in a clinical psychiatric population.

METHOD: Of 108 patients, 60 were diagnosed with ADHD. The Diagnostic Interview for ADHD in adults (DIVA 2.0) and Adult ADHD Self-Report Scale (ASRS) v.1.1 together with eight neuropsychological tests were investigated.

RESULTS: All instruments showed poor discriminative ability except for the DIVA, which showed a relatively good ability to discriminate between the groups (sensitivity = 90.0; specificity = 72.9). A logistic regression analysis model with the DIVA and measures of inattention, impulsivity, and activity from continuous performance tests (CPTs) showed a sensitivity of 90.0 and a specificity of 83.3.

CONCLUSION: Neuropsychological tests have a poor ability to discriminate between patients diagnosed with ADHD and patients not diagnosed with ADHD, but variables from CPT tests can contribute to increasing the specificity by 10% if used in combination with the DIVA.

National Category
Neurology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-281763 (URN)10.1177/1087054715618788 (DOI)000441402600001 ()26681530 (PubMedID)
Funder
The Swedish Brain Foundation
Available from: 2016-03-30 Created: 2016-03-30 Last updated: 2018-10-23Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-8853-2508

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