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Sjöberg, Rickard L.
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Publications (5 of 5) Show all publications
Sjöberg, R. L., Nilsson, K. W., Wargelius, H.-L., Leppert, J., Lindström, L. & Oreland, L. (2007). Adolescent girls and criminal activity: Role of MAOA-LPR genotype and psychosocial factors. American Journal of Medical Genetics Part B: Neuropsychiatric Genetics, 144(2), 159-164
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Adolescent girls and criminal activity: Role of MAOA-LPR genotype and psychosocial factors
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2007 (English)In: American Journal of Medical Genetics Part B: Neuropsychiatric Genetics, ISSN 1552-4841, E-ISSN 1552-485X, Vol. 144, no 2, p. 159-164Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Recent findings among boys show that interactions between a polymorphism in the monoamine oxidase A gene promoter region (MAOA-LPR) and psychosocial factors predict criminal activity. The objective of this study was to investigate whether this finding could be extended to adolescent girls. One hundred nineteen female adolescents were recruited among respondents to a cross-sectional study of the total population of 16- and 19-year old girls. These girls constituted a randomly selected sub-sample from groups representing different degrees of risk behavior. The subjects filled in a questionnaire and were interviewed and genotyped with regard to MAOA-LPR. The results indicate that the long, (4-repeat) allele confer an increased risk for criminal behavior in the presence of psychosocial risk. Among girls without social risk, MAOA-LPR genotype was of no importance for criminal behavior. The present results suggest that previous observations on adolescent males, which demonstrate that the short MAOA-LPR genotype and psychosocial adversity interact to predict criminal activity, may not be applicable to females.

Keywords
Adolescents, Criminology, Environment, Genes, Monoamine oxidase, Sex characteristics, Social support
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-94074 (URN)10.1002/ajmg.b.30360 (DOI)000244729000002 ()17034017 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2006-03-17 Created: 2006-03-17 Last updated: 2018-05-31Bibliographically approved
Sjöberg, R. (2006). [A critical question: Therapeutic effect or regression towards the mean?]. Lakartidningen, 103(26-27), 2057-8
Open this publication in new window or tab >>[A critical question: Therapeutic effect or regression towards the mean?]
2006 (Swedish)In: Lakartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, Vol. 103, no 26-27, p. 2057-8Article in journal (Other scientific) Published
Keywords
Humans, Reference Values, Regression Analysis, Treatment Outcome
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-10154 (URN)16881280 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2007-03-26 Created: 2007-03-26 Last updated: 2011-01-11
Nilsson, K. W., Alm, P. O., Leppert, J., Oreland, L., Sjöberg, R. L. & Öhrvik, J. (2006). Interaktioner mellan gener och miljö. Predicerar kriminalitet, depression och alkoholberoende. Läkartidningen, 103(39), 2859-2863
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Interaktioner mellan gener och miljö. Predicerar kriminalitet, depression och alkoholberoende
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2006 (Swedish)In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 103, no 39, p. 2859-2863Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Recently interactions between promoter polymorphisms in the serotonin transporter gene and the Monoamine oxidase-A gene have been found to interact with psychosocial factors to predict outcome such as adolescent criminal behaviour, alcohol consumption and depression. In this paper we review this emerging field of scientific inquiry with particular attention paid to findings made on a population based sample of 119 girls and 81 boys from the county of Västmanland, Sweden.

Keywords
Adolescent, Adolescent Behavior, Alcoholism/*etiology/genetics, Crime, Depression/*etiology/genetics, Environmental Exposure/*adverse effects, Female, Genetic Predisposition to Disease, Humans, Juvenile Delinquency, Male, Monoamine Oxidase/genetics, Polymorphism; Genetic, Serotonin Plasma Membrane Transport Proteins/genetics
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-102694 (URN)17128919 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2009-05-11 Created: 2009-05-11 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved
Nillson, K. W., Sjöberg, R. L., Damberg, M., Leppert, J., Öhrvik, J., Alm, P. O., . . . Oreland, L. (2006). Role of Monoamine Oxidase A Genotype and Psychosocial Factors in Male Adolescent Criminal Activity. Biological Psychiatry, 2(59), 121-127
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Role of Monoamine Oxidase A Genotype and Psychosocial Factors in Male Adolescent Criminal Activity
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2006 (English)In: Biological Psychiatry, ISSN 0006-3223, E-ISSN 1873-2402, Vol. 2, no 59, p. 121-127Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background

A number of important sociological, psychological, and biological predictors of adolescent criminal behavior have been identified during the most recent decades. The aim of this study was to replicate recent findings that interactions between a polymorphism in the monoamine oxidase A (MAO-A) gene promoter region and psychosocial factors might predict male adolescent criminal activity.

Methods

A cross-sectional study with a randomized sample from the total population of 16- and 19-year-olds from the county of Västmanland, Sweden. Eighty-one male adolescents, who volunteered to participate, were randomly selected from groups representing different degrees of deviant risk behavior.

Results

The present study strongly supports the notion that carrying the 3-repeat allele of the MAO-A–gene promoter increases the risk of male adolescent criminal behavior, when interacting with psychosocial factors. No effects at all of the MAO-A genotype on adolescent criminal activity were found when MAO-A genotype was considered alone (i.e., without its psychosocial context). The explained variance of the bio-psychosocial model (controlling for MAO-A) in this study exceeded the psychosocial model by 12%.

Conclusions

The findings support the notion that genotype and psychosocial factors interact to precipitate male adolescent criminal behavior.

Keywords
adolescents, criminology, genes, social support, environment, linear models
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-94071 (URN)10.1016/j.biopsych.2005.06.024 (DOI)000234871600004 ()
Available from: 2006-03-17 Created: 2006-03-17 Last updated: 2018-05-31Bibliographically approved
Nillson, K. W., Sjöberg, R. L., Damberg, M., Alm, P. O., Öhrvik, J., Leppert, J., . . . Oreland, L. (2005). Role of the Serotonin Transporter Gene and Family Function in Adolescent Alcohol Consumption. Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research, 29(4), 564-570
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Role of the Serotonin Transporter Gene and Family Function in Adolescent Alcohol Consumption
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2005 (English)In: Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research, ISSN 0145-6008, E-ISSN 1530-0277, Vol. 29, no 4, p. 564-570Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: That the extent to which a particular individual will engage in problematic behaviors such as delinquency, violence, or drug abuse is determined by the way psychosocial, situational, and hereditary factors interact is widely accepted. However, only recently have researchers begun to investigate the interactions between specific genotypes and psychosocial factors in relation to behavior. The purpose of the present study was to investigate possible interactions between a polymorphism in the promoter region of the serotonin transporter (5-HTT) gene and family relations on adolescent alcohol consumption.

Methods: A cross-sectional study with a randomized sample from a total population of 16- and 19-year-old adolescents from a Swedish county was conducted. Eighty-one male and 119 female adolescents, who volunteered to participate after having answered a questionnaire, were randomly selected from quartiles of volunteers representing various degrees of psychosocial risk behavior.

Results: 5-HTT genotype (p= 0.029) and family relations (p= 0.022) predicted alcohol consumption independently as well as through an interaction with one another (p= 0.05). The model explained 11% of the variance in alcohol consumption. In a binary logistic model, we found that adolescents with the LS variant of the 5-HTT gene and with family relations being “neutral” or “bad” had a 12- to 14-fold increased risk for high intoxication frequency.

Conclusions: In sum, our results show that a functional polymorphism of the 5-HTT genotype, family relations, and interactions between these variables predict adolescent alcohol consumption in a randomized sample of adolescents.

Keywords
alcohol, adolescent, genes, environment
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-94072 (URN)10.1097/01.ALC.0000159112.98941.B0 (DOI)000228577100010 ()
Available from: 2006-03-17 Created: 2006-03-17 Last updated: 2018-05-31Bibliographically approved
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