uu.seUppsala University Publications
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Publications (10 of 109) Show all publications
Guérin, C., Beuret, P., Constantin, J. M., Bellani, G., Garcia-Olivares, P., Roca, O., . . . Mercat, A. (2018). A prospective international observational prevalence study on prone positioning of ARDS patients: the APRONET (ARDS Prone Position Network) study. Intensive Care Medicine, 44(1), 22-37
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A prospective international observational prevalence study on prone positioning of ARDS patients: the APRONET (ARDS Prone Position Network) study
Show others...
2018 (English)In: Intensive Care Medicine, ISSN 0342-4642, E-ISSN 1432-1238, Vol. 44, no 1, p. 22-37Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

INTRODUCTION: While prone positioning (PP) has been shown to improve patient survival in moderate to severe acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) patients, the rate of application of PP in clinical practice still appears low.

AIM: This study aimed to determine the prevalence of use of PP in ARDS patients (primary endpoint), the physiological effects of PP, and the reasons for not using it (secondary endpoints).

METHODS: The APRONET study was a prospective international 1-day prevalence study performed four times in April, July, and October 2016 and January 2017. On each study day, investigators in each ICU had to screen every patient. For patients with ARDS, use of PP, gas exchange, ventilator settings and plateau pressure (Pplat) were recorded before and at the end of the PP session. Complications of PP and reasons for not using PP were also documented. Values are presented as median (1st-3rd quartiles).

RESULTS: Over the study period, 6723 patients were screened in 141 ICUs from 20 countries (77% of the ICUs were European), of whom 735 had ARDS and were analyzed. Overall 101 ARDS patients had at least one session of PP (13.7%), with no differences among the 4 study days. The rate of PP use was 5.9% (11/187), 10.3% (41/399) and 32.9% (49/149) in mild, moderate and severe ARDS, respectively (P = 0.0001). The duration of the first PP session was 18 (16-23) hours. Measured with the patient in the supine position before and at the end of the first PP session, PaO2/FIO2 increased from 101 (76-136) to 171 (118-220) mmHg (P = 0.0001) driving pressure decreased from 14 [11-17] to 13 [10-16] cmH2O (P = 0.001), and Pplat decreased from 26 [23-29] to 25 [23-28] cmH2O (P = 0.04). The most prevalent reason for not using PP (64.3%) was that hypoxemia was not considered sufficiently severe. Complications were reported in 12 patients (11.9%) in whom PP was used (pressure sores in five, hypoxemia in two, endotracheal tube-related in two ocular in two, and a transient increase in intracranial pressure in one).

CONCLUSIONS: In conclusion, this prospective international prevalence study found that PP was used in 32.9% of patients with severe ARDS, and was associated with low complication rates, significant increase in oxygenation and a significant decrease in driving pressure.

Keyword
ARDS, Epidemiology, Mechanical ventilation, Prone position
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-336055 (URN)10.1007/s00134-017-4996-5 (DOI)000422809000003 ()29218379 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-12-12 Created: 2017-12-12 Last updated: 2018-02-26Bibliographically approved
Kostic, P., Lo Mauro, A., Larsson, A., Hedenstierna, G., Frykholm, P. & Aliverti, A. (2018). Specific anesthesia-induced lung volume changes from induction to emergence: a pilot study.. Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica, 62(3), 282-292
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Specific anesthesia-induced lung volume changes from induction to emergence: a pilot study.
Show others...
2018 (English)In: Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-5172, E-ISSN 1399-6576, Vol. 62, no 3, p. 282-292Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Studies aimed at maintaining intraoperative lung volume to reduce post-operative pulmonary complications have been inconclusive because they mixed up the effect of general anesthesia and the surgical procedure. Our aims were to study: (1) lung volume during the entire course of anesthesia without the confounding effects of surgical procedures; (2) the combination of three interventions to maintain lung volume; and (3) the emergence phase with focus on the restored activation of the respiratory muscles.

METHODS: Eighteen ASA I-II patients undergoing ENT surgery under general anesthesia without muscle relaxants were randomized to an intervention group, receiving lung recruitment maneuver (LRM) after induction, 7 cmH2 O positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) during anesthesia and continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) during emergence with 0.4 inspired oxygen fraction (FiO2 ) or a control group, ventilated without LRM, with 0 cmH2 O PEEP, and 1.0 FiO2 during emergence without CPAP application. End-expiratory lung volume (EELV) was continuously estimated by opto-electronic plethysmography. Inspiratory and expiratory ribcage muscles electromyography was measured in a subset of seven patients.

RESULTS: End-expiratory lung volume decreased after induction in both groups. It remained low in the control group and further decreased at emergence, because of active expiratory muscle contraction. In the intervention group, EELV increased after LRM and remained high after extubation.

CONCLUSION: A combined intervention consisting of LRM, PEEP and CPAP during emergence may effectively maintain EELV during anesthesia and even after extubation. An unexpected finding was that the activation of the expiratory muscles may contribute to EELV reduction during the emergence phase.

National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-334187 (URN)10.1111/aas.13026 (DOI)000424150200001 ()29105056 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Heart Lung FoundationSwedish Research Council, 5315, K2015-99X-22731-01-4
Available from: 2017-11-21 Created: 2017-11-21 Last updated: 2018-03-15Bibliographically approved
Pino, F., Ball, L., Scaramuzzo, G., Pinol Ribas, M., Pelosi, P., Hedenstierna, G., . . . Perchiazzi, G. (2017). A comparison between PEEP titration methods in a porcine ARDS model. Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica, 61(8), 1024-1025
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A comparison between PEEP titration methods in a porcine ARDS model
Show others...
2017 (English)In: Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-5172, E-ISSN 1399-6576, Vol. 61, no 8, p. 1024-1025Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
WILEY, 2017
National Category
Anesthesiology and Intensive Care
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-342129 (URN)000407231100108 ()
Available from: 2018-02-22 Created: 2018-02-22 Last updated: 2018-02-22Bibliographically approved
Formenti, F., Bommakanti, N., Chen, R., Cronin, J., McPeak, H., Holopherne-Doran, D., . . . Farmery, A. (2017). Alveolar oxygen respiratory oscillations measured in arterial blood. Acta Physiologica, 221(SI), 20-20
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Alveolar oxygen respiratory oscillations measured in arterial blood
Show others...
2017 (English)In: Acta Physiologica, ISSN 1748-1708, E-ISSN 1748-1716, Vol. 221, no SI, p. 20-20Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
National Category
Physiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-346512 (URN)000408842000038 ()
Available from: 2018-03-19 Created: 2018-03-19 Last updated: 2018-03-19Bibliographically approved
Kassebaum, N., Kyu, H. H., Zoeckler, L., Olsen, H. E., Thomas, K., Pinho, C., . . . Vos, T. (2017). Child and Adolescent Health From 1990 to 2015: Findings From the Global Burden of Diseases, Injuries, and Risk Factors 2015 Study. JAMA pediatrics, 171(6), 573-592
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Child and Adolescent Health From 1990 to 2015: Findings From the Global Burden of Diseases, Injuries, and Risk Factors 2015 Study
Show others...
2017 (English)In: JAMA pediatrics, ISSN 2168-6203, E-ISSN 2168-6211, Vol. 171, no 6, p. 573-592Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Importance: Comprehensive and timely monitoring of disease burden in all age groups, including children and adolescents, is essential for improving population health.

Objective: To quantify and describe levels and trends of mortality and nonfatal health outcomes among children and adolescents from 1990 to 2015 to provide a framework for policy discussion.

Evidence Review: Cause-specific mortality and nonfatal health outcomes were analyzed for 195 countries and territories by age group, sex, and year from 1990 to 2015 using standardized approaches for data processing and statistical modeling, with subsequent analysis of the findings to describe levels and trends across geography and time among children and adolescents 19 years or younger. A composite indicator of income, education, and fertility was developed (Socio-demographic Index [SDI]) for each geographic unit and year, which evaluates the historical association between SDI and health loss.

Findings: Global child and adolescent mortality decreased from 14.18 million (95% uncertainty interval [UI], 14.09 million to 14.28 million) deaths in 1990 to 7.26 million (95% UI, 7.14 million to 7.39 million) deaths in 2015, but progress has been unevenly distributed. Countries with a lower SDI had a larger proportion of mortality burden (75%) in 2015 than was the case in 1990 (61%). Most deaths in 2015 occurred in South Asia and sub-Saharan Africa. Global trends were driven by reductions in mortality owing to infectious, nutritional, and neonatal disorders, which in the aggregate led to a relative increase in the importance of noncommunicable diseases and injuries in explaining global disease burden. The absolute burden of disability in children and adolescents increased 4.3% (95% UI, 3.1%-5.6%) from 1990 to 2015, with much of the increase owing to population growth and improved survival for children and adolescents to older ages. Other than infectious conditions, many top causes of disability are associated with long-term sequelae of conditions present at birth (eg, neonatal disorders, congenital birth defects, and hemoglobinopathies) and complications of a variety of infections and nutritional deficiencies. Anemia, developmental intellectual disability, hearing loss, epilepsy, and vision loss are important contributors to childhood disability that can arise from multiple causes. Maternal and reproductive health remains a key cause of disease burden in adolescent females, especially in lower-SDI countries. In low-SDI countries, mortality is the primary driver of health loss for children and adolescents, whereas disability predominates in higher-SDI locations; the specific pattern of epidemiological transition varies across diseases and injuries.

Conclusions and Relevance: Consistent international attention and investment have led to sustained improvements in causes of health loss among children and adolescents in many countries, although progress has been uneven. The persistence of infectious diseases in some countries, coupled with ongoing epidemiologic transition to injuries and noncommunicable diseases, require all countries to carefully evaluate and implement appropriate strategies to maximize the health of their children and adolescents and for the international community to carefully consider which elements of child and adolescent health should be monitored.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
AMER MEDICAL ASSOC, 2017
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-319725 (URN)10.1001/jamapediatrics.2017.0250 (DOI)000402714300018 ()28384795 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-04-07 Created: 2017-04-07 Last updated: 2017-08-28Bibliographically approved
Holzgraefe, B., Andersson, C., Kalzén, H., von Bahr, V., Mosskin, M., Larsson, E.-M., . . . Larsson, A. (2017). Does permissive hypoxaemia during extracorporeal membrane oxygenation cause long-term neurological impairment?: A study in patients with H1N1-induced severe respiratory failure. European Journal of Anaesthesiology, 34(2), 98-103
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Does permissive hypoxaemia during extracorporeal membrane oxygenation cause long-term neurological impairment?: A study in patients with H1N1-induced severe respiratory failure
Show others...
2017 (English)In: European Journal of Anaesthesiology, ISSN 0265-0215, E-ISSN 1365-2346, Vol. 34, no 2, p. 98-103Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: The Extracorporeal Life Support Organisation accepts permissive hypoxaemia in adult patients during extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). The neurological long-term outcome of this approach has not yet been studied.

OBJECTIVES: We investigated the prevalence of brain lesions and cognitive dysfunction in survivors from the Influenza A/H1N1 2009 pandemic treated with permissive hypoxaemia during ECMO for severe acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Our hypothesis was that this method is reasonable if tissue hypoxia is avoided.

DESIGN: Long-term follow-up study after ECMO.

SETTING: Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden, from October 2012 to July 2013.

PATIENTS: Seven patients treated with ECMO for severe influenza A/H1N1-induced ARDS were studied 3.2 years after treatment. Blood lactate concentrations were used as a surrogate for tissue oxygenation.

INTERVENTIONS: Neurocognitive outcome was studied with standardised cognitive tests and MRI of the brain.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Cognitive functioning and hypoxic brain lesions after permissive hypoxaemia during ECMO. The observation period was the first 10 days of ECMO or the entire treatment period if shorter than 10 days.

RESULTS: Eleven of 13 patients were still alive 3 years after ECMO. We were able to contact seven of these patients (mean age 31 years), who all agreed to participate in this study. Mean +/- SD peripherally measured arterial saturation during the observation period was 79 +/- 10%. Full-scale Intelligence Quotient was within one standard deviation or above from the mean of a healthy population in five patients, and was 1.5 SD below the mean in one patient. In one other patient, it could not be determined because of a lack of formal education. Memory functioning was normal in all patients. MRI showed no changes related to cerebral hypoxia.

CONCLUSIONS: Permissive hypoxaemia during ECMO might not negatively affect long-term cognitive outcome if adequate organ perfusion is maintained.

National Category
Anesthesiology and Intensive Care
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-310232 (URN)10.1097/EJA.0000000000000544 (DOI)000392170300008 ()28030441 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Heart Lung FoundationSwedish Research Council
Available from: 2016-12-13 Created: 2016-12-13 Last updated: 2017-11-29Bibliographically approved
Broche, L., Perchiazzi, G., Porra, L., Tannoia, A., Pellegrini, M., Derosa, S., . . . Bayat, S. (2017). Dynamic Mechanical Interactions Between Neighboring Airspaces Determine Cyclic Opening and Closure in Injured Lung. Critical Care Medicine, 45(4), 687-694
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Dynamic Mechanical Interactions Between Neighboring Airspaces Determine Cyclic Opening and Closure in Injured Lung
Show others...
2017 (English)In: Critical Care Medicine, ISSN 0090-3493, E-ISSN 1530-0293, Vol. 45, no 4, p. 687-694Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives: Positive pressure ventilation exposes the lung to mechanical stresses that can exacerbate injury. The exact mechanism of this pathologic process remains elusive. The goal of this study was to describe recruitment/derecruitment at acinar length scales over short-time frames and test the hypothesis that mechanical interdependence between neighboring lung units determines the spatial and temporal distributions of recruitment/derecruitment, using a computational model. Design: Experimental animal study. Setting: International synchrotron radiation laboratory. Subjects: Four anesthetized rabbits, ventilated in pressure controlled mode. Interventions: The lung was consecutively imaged at - 1.5-minute intervals using phase-contrast synchrotron imaging, at positive end expiratory pressures of 12, 9, 6, 3, and 0 cm H2O before and after lavage and mechanical ventilation induced injury. The extent and spatial distribution of recruitment/derecruitment was analyzed by subtracting subsequent images. In a realistic lung structure, we implemented a mechanistic model in which each unit has individual pressures and speeds of opening and closing. Derecruited and recruited lung fractions (F-derecruaed, F-recruited) were computed based on the comparison of the aerated volumes at successive time points. Measurements and Main Results: Alternative recruitment/derecruitment occurred in neighboring alveoli over short-time scales in all tested positive end-expiratory pressure levels and despite stable pressure controlled mode. The computational model reproduced this behavior only when parenchymal interdependence between neighboring acini was accounted for. Simulations closely mimicked the experimental magnitude of F-derecruited and F-recruited when mechanical interdependence was included, while its exclusion gave F-recruited values of zero at positive end -expiratory pressure greater than or equal to 3 cm H2O. Conclusions: These findings give further insight into the microscopic behavior of the injured lung and provide a means of testing protective-ventilation strategies to prevent recruitment/derecruitment and subsequent lung damage.

Keyword
acute respiratory distress syndrome, assisted ventilation, imaging/computed tomography, pulmonary oedema, synchrotron
National Category
Anesthesiology and Intensive Care
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-321336 (URN)10.1097/CCM.0000000000002234 (DOI)000396798700016 ()28107207 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Heart Lung FoundationSwedish Research CouncilNIH (National Institute of Health)
Available from: 2017-05-31 Created: 2017-05-31 Last updated: 2017-05-31Bibliographically approved
Kretzschmar, M., Kozian, A., Baumgardner, J. E., Borges, J. B., Hedenstierna, G., Larsson, A., . . . Schilling, T. (2017). Effect of Bronchoconstriction-induced Ventilation-Perfusion Mismatch on Uptake and Elimination of Isoflurane and Desflurane. Anesthesiology, 127(5), 800-812
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effect of Bronchoconstriction-induced Ventilation-Perfusion Mismatch on Uptake and Elimination of Isoflurane and Desflurane
Show others...
2017 (English)In: Anesthesiology, ISSN 0003-3022, E-ISSN 1528-1175, Vol. 127, no 5, p. 800-812Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Increasing numbers of patients with obstructive lung diseases need anesthesia for surgery. These conditions are associated with pulmonary ventilation/perfusion (VA/Q) mismatch affecting kinetics of volatile anesthetics. Pure shunt might delay uptake of less soluble anesthetic agents but other forms of VA/Q scatter have not yet been examined. Volatile anesthetics with higher blood solubility would be less affected by VA/Q mismatch. We therefore compared uptake and elimination of higher soluble isoflurane and less soluble desflurane in a piglet model.

METHODS: Juvenile piglets (26.7 ± 1.5 kg) received either isoflurane (n = 7) or desflurane (n = 7). Arterial and mixed venous blood samples were obtained during wash-in and wash-out of volatile anesthetics before and during bronchoconstriction by methacholine inhalation (100 μg/ml). Total uptake and elimination were calculated based on partial pressure measurements by micropore membrane inlet mass spectrometry and literature-derived partition coefficients and assumed end-expired to arterial gradients to be negligible. VA/Q distribution was assessed by the multiple inert gas elimination technique.

RESULTS: Before methacholine inhalation, isoflurane arterial partial pressures reached 90% of final plateau within 16 min and decreased to 10% after 28 min. By methacholine nebulization, arterial uptake and elimination delayed to 35 and 44 min. Desflurane needed 4 min during wash-in and 6 min during wash-out, but with bronchoconstriction 90% of both uptake and elimination was reached within 15 min.

CONCLUSIONS: Inhaled methacholine induced bronchoconstriction and inhomogeneous VA/Q distribution. Solubility of inhalational anesthetics significantly influenced pharmacokinetics: higher soluble isoflurane is less affected than fairly insoluble desflurane, indicating different uptake and elimination during bronchoconstriction.

National Category
Anesthesiology and Intensive Care
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-334179 (URN)10.1097/ALN.0000000000001847 (DOI)000414634700010 ()28857808 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, X2015-99x-22731-01-04
Available from: 2017-11-21 Created: 2017-11-21 Last updated: 2018-02-16Bibliographically approved
Santos, A., Gomez-Peñalver, E., Monge-Garcia, M. I., Retamal, J., Batista Borges, J., Tusman, G., . . . Suarez-Sipmann, F. (2017). Effects on Pulmonary Vascular Mechanics of Two Different Lung-Protective Ventilation Strategies in an Experimental Model of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome. Critical Care Medicine, 45(11), e1157-e1164
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects on Pulmonary Vascular Mechanics of Two Different Lung-Protective Ventilation Strategies in an Experimental Model of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome
Show others...
2017 (English)In: Critical Care Medicine, ISSN 0090-3493, E-ISSN 1530-0293, Vol. 45, no 11, p. e1157-e1164Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVES: To compare the effects of two lung-protective ventilation strategies on pulmonary vascular mechanics in early acute respiratory distress syndrome.

DESIGN: Experimental study.

SETTING: University animal research laboratory.

SUBJECTS: Twelve pigs (30.8 ± 2.5 kg).

INTERVENTIONS: Acute respiratory distress syndrome was induced by repeated lung lavages and injurious mechanical ventilation. Thereafter, animals were randomized to 4 hours ventilation according to the Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Network protocol or to an open lung approach strategy. Pressure and flow sensors placed at the pulmonary artery trunk allowed continuous assessment of pulmonary artery resistance, effective elastance, compliance, and reflected pressure waves. Respiratory mechanics and gas exchange data were collected.

MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Acute respiratory distress syndrome led to pulmonary vascular mechanics deterioration. Four hours after randomization, pulmonary vascular mechanics was similar in Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Network and open lung approach: resistance (578 ± 252 vs 626 ± 153 dyn.s/cm; p = 0.714), effective elastance, (0.63 ± 0.22 vs 0.58 ± 0.17 mm Hg/mL; p = 0.710), compliance (1.19 ± 0.8 vs 1.50 ± 0.27 mL/mm Hg; p = 0.437), and reflection index (0.36 ± 0.04 vs 0.34 ± 0.09; p = 0.680). Open lung approach as compared to Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Network was associated with improved dynamic respiratory compliance (17.3 ± 2.6 vs 10.5 ± 1.3 mL/cm H2O; p < 0.001), driving pressure (9.6 ± 1.3 vs 19.3 ± 2.7 cm H2O; p < 0.001), and venous admixture (0.05 ± 0.01 vs 0.22 ± 0.03, p < 0.001) and lower mean pulmonary artery pressure (26 ± 3 vs 34 ± 7 mm Hg; p = 0.045) despite of using a higher positive end-expiratory pressure (17.4 ± 0.7 vs 9.5 ± 2.4 cm H2O; p < 0.001). Cardiac index, however, was lower in open lung approach (1.42 ± 0.16 vs 2.27 ± 0.48 L/min; p = 0.005).

CONCLUSIONS: In this experimental model, Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Network and open lung approach affected pulmonary vascular mechanics similarly. The use of higher positive end-expiratory pressures in the open lung approach strategy did not worsen pulmonary vascular mechanics, improved lung mechanics, and gas exchange but at the expense of a lower cardiac index.

National Category
Respiratory Medicine and Allergy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-334177 (URN)10.1097/CCM.0000000000002701 (DOI)000417107000007 ()28872540 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, K2015-99X-22731-01-4Swedish Heart Lung FoundationEU, FP7, Seventh Framework Programme, 291820
Available from: 2017-11-21 Created: 2017-11-21 Last updated: 2018-03-09Bibliographically approved
Fardin, L., Broche, L., Coll, J.-L. -., Larsson, A., Bayat, S. & Bravin, A. (2017). Enhancing Lung Tumor Visibility Using In-Vivo Analyzer-Based X-Ray Phase Contrast Imaging In Mouse: A Feasibility Study. Paper presented at International Conference of the American-Thoracic-Society (ATS), MAY 19-24, 2017, Washington, AFGHANISTAN. American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, 195, Article ID A6514.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Enhancing Lung Tumor Visibility Using In-Vivo Analyzer-Based X-Ray Phase Contrast Imaging In Mouse: A Feasibility Study
Show others...
2017 (English)In: American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, ISSN 1073-449X, E-ISSN 1535-4970, Vol. 195, article id A6514Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
National Category
Respiratory Medicine and Allergy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-332906 (URN)000400372506473 ()
Conference
International Conference of the American-Thoracic-Society (ATS), MAY 19-24, 2017, Washington, AFGHANISTAN
Funder
Swedish Heart Lung FoundationSwedish Research Council
Available from: 2017-11-06 Created: 2017-11-06 Last updated: 2017-11-06Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-0702-8343

Search in DiVA

Show all publications