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Lindblad, Frank
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Publications (10 of 64) Show all publications
Tingstedt, O., Lindblad, F., Koposov, R., Blatny, M., Hrdlicka, M., Stickley, A. & Ruchkin, V. V. (2018). Somatic symptoms and internalizing problems in urban youth: a cross-cultural comparison of Czech and Russian adolescents. European Journal of Public Health, 28(3), 480-484
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Somatic symptoms and internalizing problems in urban youth: a cross-cultural comparison of Czech and Russian adolescents
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2018 (English)In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 28, no 3, p. 480-484Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Although the association between somatic complaints and internalizing problems (anxiety, somatic anxiety and depression) is well established, it remains unclear whether the pattern of this relationship differs by gender and in different cultures. The aim of this study was to examine cross-cultural and gender-specific differences in the association between somatic complaints and internalizing problems in youth from the Czech Republic and Russia. Methods: The Social and Health Assessment, a self-report survey, was completed by representative community samples of adolescents, age 12-17 years, from the Czech Republic (N = 4770) and Russia (N = 2728). Results: A strong association was observed between somatic complaints and internalizing psychopathology. Although the levels of internalizing problems differed by country and gender, they increased together with and largely in a similar way to somatic complaints for boys and girls in both countries. Conclusion: The association between somatic symptoms and internalizing problems seems to be similar for boys and girls across cultures.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2018
National Category
Psychiatry Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-357721 (URN)10.1093/eurpub/cky001 (DOI)000434046900019 ()29373646 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-08-31 Created: 2018-08-31 Last updated: 2018-08-31Bibliographically approved
Jonsson, U., Johanson, J., Nilsson, E. & Lindblad, F. (2016). Adverse effects of psychological therapy: An exploratory study of practitioners' experiences from child and adolescent psychiatry. Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 21(3), 432-446
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Adverse effects of psychological therapy: An exploratory study of practitioners' experiences from child and adolescent psychiatry
2016 (English)In: Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, ISSN 1359-1045, E-ISSN 1461-7021, Vol. 21, no 3, p. 432-446Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The scientific knowledge about adverse effects of psychological therapies and how such effects should be detected is limited. It is possible that children and adolescents are particularly vulnerable and need specific support in order to express adverse effects. In this exploratory study, we used a qualitative approach to explore practitioners' experiences of this phenomenon. Fourteen practitioners providing psychological therapy within the Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Service were interviewed. Qualitative content analysis was applied to the data. Four overarching categories brought up by the practitioners were identified: vagueness of the concept (reflecting that the concept was novel and hard to define), psychotherapist-client interaction (encompassing aspects of the interaction possibly related to adverse effects), consequences for the young person (including a range of emotional, behavioural and social consequences) and family effects (e.g. professional complications and decreased autonomy for the parent). Professional discussions on these issues could improve psychological therapy for children and adolescents. Based on our findings and previous research, we propose three basic aspects to consider when adverse effects are detected and managed in this context: typology (form, severity and duration), aetiology (hypothesis about the causes) and perspective (adverse effects seen from the points of view of different interested parties).

National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Research subject
Child and Youth Psychiatry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-278180 (URN)10.1177/1359104515614072 (DOI)000380937300009 ()26585069 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-02-24 Created: 2016-02-24 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
Isaksson, J., Högberg, U., Valladares, E. & Lindblad, F. (2016). Associations between psychiatric symptoms and cortisol levels in Nicaraguan young school-age children. Psychiatry Research, 240, 376-380
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Associations between psychiatric symptoms and cortisol levels in Nicaraguan young school-age children
2016 (English)In: Psychiatry Research, ISSN 0165-1781, E-ISSN 1872-7123, Vol. 240, p. 376-380Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The regulation of the Hypothalamus-Pituitary-Adrenal axis (HPA-axis) with its end product cortisol seems to be affected in several psychiatric disorders. Although findings are not conclusive, internalizing symptoms have primarily been associated with higher diurnal cortisol levels and externalizing symptoms with lower cortisol levels. In this study on nine-year-olds in Nicaragua (n=111), we investigated associations between child psychiatric symptoms, using the Child Behavior Check List (CBCL), and saliva cortisol levels collected in the morning and afternoon, also adjusting for potential confounders. In line with previous findings, internalizing symptoms were significantly associated with higher morning, but not afternoon cortisol levels. Surprisingly, externalizing symptoms were also significantly associated with higher morning cortisol levels. Possibly, this association between externalizing symptoms and cortisol levels may be characteristic of early ages, representing a higher exposure to external stressors. The study highlights the need for prospective studies, following the development of the HPA-axis and its association with psychiatric symptoms.

National Category
Psychiatry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-292594 (URN)10.1016/j.psychres.2016.04.069 (DOI)000378359500060 ()27138834 (PubMedID)
Funder
Sida - Swedish International Development Cooperation AgencySwedish Research Council, K 2002-27 x 14290-01A
Available from: 2016-05-04 Created: 2016-05-04 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
Isaksson, J., Ruchkin, V. & Lindblad, F. (2016). Unseen and Stressed? Gender Differences in Parent and Teacher Ratings of ADHD Symptoms and Associations With Perceived Stress in Children With ADHD.. Journal of Attention Disorders
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Unseen and Stressed? Gender Differences in Parent and Teacher Ratings of ADHD Symptoms and Associations With Perceived Stress in Children With ADHD.
2016 (English)In: Journal of Attention Disorders, ISSN 1087-0547, E-ISSN 1557-1246Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE: In this study, we investigate the differences between parent and teacher ADHD ratings, and how these ratings relate to perceived stress in children with ADHD.

METHOD: Ratings by parents and teachers with the Swanson, Nolan and Pelham ADHD symptom rating scale (SNAP-IV) were collected from children with a clinical diagnosis of ADHD (n = 137). Also, information on medication was collected. Children (≥11 years of age; n = 64) were invited to complete the Pressure-Activation-Stress scale.

RESULTS: Among girls, but not boys, teacher ratings were significantly lower than parental ratings on all symptom scales. Lower teacher ratings on hyperactivity symptoms were associated with higher levels of perceived stress.

CONCLUSION: The findings suggest a potential gender bias in ratings among teachers. Underrated, and hence underidentified, ADHD problems in the school setting seem to increase the perception of stress in the sense of pressure for both girls and boys.

Keywords
ADHD, gender differences, perceived stress, symptom ratings
National Category
Psychiatry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-299000 (URN)10.1177/1087054716658381 (DOI)27401240 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-07-13 Created: 2016-07-13 Last updated: 2017-11-28Bibliographically approved
Swartz, J., Lindblad, F., Arinell, H., Theorell, T. & Alm, J. (2015). Anthroposophic lifestyle and salivary cortisol are associated with a lower risk of sensitization during childhood. Pediatric Allergy and Immunology, 26(2), 153-160
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Anthroposophic lifestyle and salivary cortisol are associated with a lower risk of sensitization during childhood
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2015 (English)In: Pediatric Allergy and Immunology, ISSN 0905-6157, E-ISSN 1399-3038, Vol. 26, no 2, p. 153-160Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background

Infants from anthroposophic families have low cortisol levels and low risk of IgE-sensitization during first 2 years of life. Our aim is to study the impact of an anthroposophic lifestyle and cortisol levels at 6 months on allergy sensitization up to age 5 years.

Methods

507 families participated from maternal health care centers. Parental lifestyle was categorized as Anthroposophic, Partly anthroposophic or Non-anthroposophic. Blood samples for analyzes of sensitization were obtained from parents at inclusion and from children at 6, 12, 24 and 60 months. Salivary samples were collected at home at 6 months.

Results

Sensitization increased from 2.9 to 26.0% in the anthroposophic group, from 8.4 to 26.8% in the partly anthroposophic group and from 19.1 to 44.1% in the non-anthroposophic group. Children from anthroposophic families had lower cortisol levels in the morning, afternoon and evening. The odds ratio (OR) for anthroposophic lifestyle was always <1 and lowest at 12 months (OR, 0.10; 95% CI, 0.03-0.36). Adjusting for cortisol levels at 6 months increased these ORs at 12 and 24 months. At the same ages ORs for sensitization were elevated also for cortisol levels at 6 months. Analyzes in children not sensitized at 6 months confirmed the cortisol-related risk of sensitization.

Conclusions

Children from families with an anthroposophic lifestyle have lower risk than comparisons of developing sensitization up to 5 years. This risk is partially explained by low cortisol levels during infancy. High cortisol levels at 6 months predict sensitization up to 24 months.

National Category
Pediatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-221953 (URN)10.1111/pai.12342 (DOI)000351626800011 ()
Available from: 2014-04-07 Created: 2014-04-07 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Gupta Löfving, S., Lindblad, F., Stickley, A., Schwab-Stone, M. & Ruchkin, V. (2015). Community violence exposure and severe posttraumatic stress in suburban American youth: risk and protective factors. Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology, 50(4), 539-547
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Community violence exposure and severe posttraumatic stress in suburban American youth: risk and protective factors
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2015 (English)In: Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology, ISSN 0933-7954, E-ISSN 1433-9285, Vol. 50, no 4, p. 539-547Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

PURPOSE: The psychological effects of community violence exposure among inner-city youth are severe, yet little is known about its prevalence and moderators among suburban middle-class youth. This study aimed to assess the prevalence of community violence exposure among suburban American youth, to examine associated posttraumatic stress and to evaluate factors related to severe vs. less severe posttraumatic stress, such as co-existing internalizing and externalizing problems, as well as the effects of teacher support, parental warmth and support, perceived neighborhood safety and conventional involvement in this context.

METHOD: Data were collected from 780 suburban, predominantly Caucasian middle-class high-school adolescents in the Northeastern US during the Social and Health Assessment (SAHA) study.

RESULTS: A substantial number of suburban youth were exposed to community violence and 24 % of those victimized by community violence developed severe posttraumatic stress. Depressive symptoms were strongly associated with higher levels and perceived teacher support with lower levels of posttraumatic stress.

CONCLUSION: Similar to urban youth, youth living in suburban areas in North American settings may be affected by community violence. A substantial proportion of these youth reports severe posttraumatic stress and high levels of comorbid depressive symptoms. Teacher support may have a protective effect against severe posttraumatic stress and thus needs to be further assessed as a potential factor that can be used to mitigate the detrimental effects of violence exposure.

National Category
Psychiatry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-245575 (URN)10.1007/s00127-014-0965-2 (DOI)000351436700005 ()25301519 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2015-02-27 Created: 2015-02-27 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
Lindblad, F., Isaksson, J., Heiskala, V., Koposov, R. & Ruchkin, V. (2015). Comorbidity and Behavior Characteristics of Russian Male Juvenile Delinquents With ADHD and Conduct Disorder. journal of attention disorders
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Comorbidity and Behavior Characteristics of Russian Male Juvenile Delinquents With ADHD and Conduct Disorder
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2015 (English)In: journal of attention disorders, ISSN 1557-1246Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE: To test the previously suggested hypothesis that those with comorbid ADHD and Conduct Disorder (CD) diagnoses differ from other antisocially involved youth in terms of higher rates of violent behavior, impulsiveness, and psychopathic traits.

METHOD: Three hundred eighty juvenile incarcerated delinquents from Northern Russia were assessed by means of semi-structured psychiatric interview and by student and teacher self-reports.

RESULTS: The study has demonstrated higher rates of psychiatric disorders and of comorbidity, as well as more complicated substance abuse and disruptive behaviors in those with combined ADHD-CD diagnosis, as compared with CD only, ADHD only, and no CD no ADHD groups. The results regarding psychopathic traits were inconclusive.

CONCLUSION: The group with combined ADHD-CD diagnosis is more severely disturbed, both as concerns psychiatric comorbidity and more severe aggressive and disruptive behaviors. However, there is only limited evidence supporting a higher prevalence of psychopathic traits in this group.

National Category
Psychiatry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-252383 (URN)10.1177/1087054715584052 (DOI)25926630 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2015-05-06 Created: 2015-05-06 Last updated: 2016-02-17
Elmelid, A., Stickley, A., Lindblad, F., Schwab-Stone, M., Henrich, C. C. & Ruchkin, V. (2015). Depressive symptoms, anxiety and academic motivation in youth: Do schools and families make a difference?. Journal of Adolescence, 45, 174-182
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Depressive symptoms, anxiety and academic motivation in youth: Do schools and families make a difference?
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2015 (English)In: Journal of Adolescence, ISSN 0140-1971, E-ISSN 1095-9254, Vol. 45, p. 174-182Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This longitudinal study aimed to examine the association between depressive and anxiety symptoms and academic motivation by gender, and whether positive school and family factors would be associated with academic motivation, in spite of the presence of such symptoms. Study participants were predominantly economically disadvantaged youths aged 13-15 years in a Northeastern US urban public school system. The Social and Health Assessment (SAHA) served as the basis for a survey undertaken in 2003 and 2004 with information being used from students who participated at both time points (N = 643). Multiple linear regression analyses showed that depressive symptoms were negatively associated with academic motivation, while anxiety was positively related to academic motivation in both genders. Teacher support, school attachment and parental control were positively related to academic motivation even in the presence of internalizing problems. The negative association of depressive symptoms with academic motivation may be potentially decreased by attachment to school.

Keywords
Academic motivation, Depression and anxiety, Protective factors
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-274696 (URN)10.1016/j.adolescence.2015.08.003 (DOI)000366785700018 ()26476790 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-02-08 Created: 2016-01-25 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
Lindblad, F., Eickhoff, M., Forslund, A. H., Isaksson, J. & Gustafsson, J. (2015). Fasting blood glucose and HbA1c in children with ADHD. Psychiatry Research, 226(2-3), 515-516
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Fasting blood glucose and HbA1c in children with ADHD
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2015 (English)In: Psychiatry Research, ISSN 0165-1781, E-ISSN 1872-7123, Vol. 226, no 2-3, p. 515-516Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Reports of hypocortisolism and overweight in pediatric ADHD motivate an investigation of blood glucose regulation in this group. Fasting blood glucose and HbA1c were investigated in 10 children (10-15 years) with ADHD and 22 comparisons. Fasting blood glucose was similar in both groups. HbA1c values were higher in the ADHD-group. BMI-SDS was also higher in the ADHD-group but did not predict HbA1c. The results suggest an association between ADHD and an altered blood glucose homeostasis.

National Category
Psychiatry Endocrinology and Diabetes
Research subject
Child and Youth Psychiatry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-248604 (URN)10.1016/j.psychres.2015.01.028 (DOI)000353095500017 ()25747679 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2015-04-14 Created: 2015-04-02 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
Isaksson, J., Lindblad, F., Valladares, E. & Högberg, U. (2015). High maternal cortisol levels during pregnancy are associated with more psychiatric symptoms in offspring at age of nine: A prospective study from Nicaragua. Journal of Psychiatric Research, 71, 97-102
Open this publication in new window or tab >>High maternal cortisol levels during pregnancy are associated with more psychiatric symptoms in offspring at age of nine: A prospective study from Nicaragua
2015 (English)In: Journal of Psychiatric Research, ISSN 0022-3956, E-ISSN 1879-1379, Vol. 71, p. 97-102Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Maternal exposure to stress or adversity during pregnancy has been associated with negative health effects for the offspring including psychiatric symptoms. Programming of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis has been suggested as one mediating process. In order to investigate possible long term effects of stressors during pregnancy, we followed 70 children and their mothers from pregnancy up to nine years aiming to investigate if maternal cortisol levels and distress/exposure to partner violence were associated with child psychiatric symptoms and child cortisol levels at follow-up. Maternal distress was evaluated using The Self Reporting Questionnaire, exposure to partner violence by an instrument from WHO and child psychiatric symptoms with Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL). We adjusted the analyses for gestational week, gender, SES, perinatal data and maternal distress/exposure to partner violence at child age of nine years. Elevated maternal cortisol levels during pregnancy, as a possible marker of maternal stress load, were correlated with higher CBCL-ratings, especially concerning externalizing symptoms. Maternal cortisol levels during pregnancy were not associated with child cortisol levels at child age of nine years. Maternal distress and exposure to partner violence during pregnancy were neither associated with child psychiatric symptoms nor child cortisol levels. To conclude, intrauterine exposure to elevated cortisol levels was associated with higher ratings on offspring psychopathology at nine years of age. The lack of association between maternal cortisol levels during pregnancy and child cortisol levels does not support the hypothesis of fetal programming of the HPA-axis, but reliability problems may have contributed to this negative finding.

Keywords
HPA-axis; Cortisol; Psychiatric symptoms; CBCL; Distress; Fetal programming theory
National Category
Psychiatry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-264475 (URN)10.1016/j.jpsychires.2015.09.016 (DOI)000365053900012 ()26458013 (PubMedID)
Funder
Sida - Swedish International Development Cooperation AgencySwedish Research Council, K 2002-27X14290-01A
Available from: 2015-10-13 Created: 2015-10-13 Last updated: 2017-12-01Bibliographically approved
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