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Wikström, Johan
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Publications (10 of 64) Show all publications
Nelander, M., Wikström, A.-K., Weis, J., Bergman, L., Larsson, A., Sundström Poromaa, I. & Wikström, J. (2018). Cerebral osmolytes and plasma osmolality in pregnancy and preeclampsia: a proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy study. American Journal of Hypertension, 31(7), 847-853
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cerebral osmolytes and plasma osmolality in pregnancy and preeclampsia: a proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy study
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2018 (English)In: American Journal of Hypertension, ISSN 0895-7061, E-ISSN 1941-7225, Vol. 31, no 7, p. 847-853Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Abstract

Background: Cerebral complications contribute substantially to mortality in preeclampsia. Pregnancy calls for extensive maternal adaptations, some associated with increased propensity for seizures, but the pathophysiology behind the eclamptic seizures is not fully understood. Plasma osmolality and sodium levels are lowered in pregnancy. This could result in extrusion of cerebral organic osmolytes, including the excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate, but this remains to be determined. The hypothesis of this study was that cerebral levels of organic osmolytes are decreased during pregnancy, and that this decrease is even more pronounced in women with preeclampsia.

Method: We used proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy to compare levels of cerebral organic osmolytes, in women with preeclampsia (n=30), normal pregnancy (n=32) and non-pregnant controls (n=16). Cerebral levels organic osmolytes were further correlated to plasma osmolality, and plasma levels of glutamate and sodium.

Results: Compared to non-pregnant women, women with normal pregnancy and preeclampsia had lower levels of the cerebral osmolytes myo-inositol, choline and creatine (p=0.001 or less), and all these metabolites correlated with each other (p<0.05). Women with normal pregnancies and preeclampsia had similar levels of osmolytes, except for glutamate, which was significantly lower in preeclampsia. Cerebral and plasma glutamate levels were negatively correlated with each other (p<0.008), and cerebral myo-inositol, choline and creatine levels were all positively correlated with both plasma osmolality and sodium levels (p<0.05).

Conclusion: Our results indicate that pregnancy is associated with extrusion of cerebral organic osmolytes. This includes the excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate, which may be involved in the pathophysiology of seizures in preeclampsia.

Keywords
Preeclampsia, eclampsia, proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy, cerebral osmolytes, glutamate
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Research subject
Obstetrics and Gynaecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-341642 (URN)10.1093/ajh/hpy019 (DOI)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2014-3561
Available from: 2018-02-12 Created: 2018-02-12 Last updated: 2018-06-19Bibliographically approved
Jensson, D., Enghag, S., Bylund, N., Jonsson, L., Wikström, J., Grindlund, M. E., . . . Rodriguez-Lorenzo, A. (2018). Cranial Nerve Coactivation and Implication for Nerve Transfers to the Facial Nerve.. Plastic and reconstructive surgery (1963), 141(4), 582e-585e
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cranial Nerve Coactivation and Implication for Nerve Transfers to the Facial Nerve.
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2018 (English)In: Plastic and reconstructive surgery (1963), ISSN 0032-1052, E-ISSN 1529-4242, Vol. 141, no 4, p. 582e-585eArticle in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In reanimation surgery, effortless smile can be achieved by a nonfacial donor nerve. The underlying mechanisms for this smile development, and which is the best nonfacial neurotizer, need further clarification. The aim of the present study was therefore to further explore the natural coactivation between facial mimic muscles and muscles innervated by the most common donor nerves used in smile reanimation. The study was conducted in 10 healthy adults. Correlation between voluntary facial muscle movements and simultaneous electromyographic activity in muscles innervated by the masseter, hypoglossal, and spinal accessory nerves was assessed. The association between voluntary movements in the latter muscles and simultaneous electromyographic activity in facial muscles was also studied. Smile coactivated the masseter and tongue muscles equally. During the seven mimic movements, the masseter muscle had fewer electromyographically measured coactivations compared with the tongue (two of seven versus five of seven). The trapezius muscle demonstrated no coactivation during mimic movements. Movements of the masseter, tongue, and trapezius muscles induced electromyographically recorded coactivation in the facial muscles. Bite resulted in the strongest coactivation of the zygomaticus major muscle. The authors demonstrated coactivation between voluntary smile and the masseter and tongue muscles. During voluntary bite, strong coactivation of the zygomaticus major muscle was noted. The narrower coactivation pattern in the masseter muscle may be advantageous for central relearning and the development of a spontaneous smile. The strong coactivation between the masseter muscle and the zygomaticus major indicates that the masseter nerve may be preferred in smile reanimation.

National Category
Surgery
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-347468 (URN)10.1097/PRS.0000000000004235 (DOI)000428668900014 ()29595736 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-04-03 Created: 2018-04-03 Last updated: 2018-06-20Bibliographically approved
Engman, J., Sundström Poromaa, I., Moby, L., Wikström, J., Fredriksson, M. & Gingnell, M. (2018). Hormonal Cycle and Contraceptive Effects on Amygdala and Salience Resting-State Networks in Women with Previous Affective Side Effects on the Pill.. Neuropsychopharmacology, 43(3), 555-563
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Hormonal Cycle and Contraceptive Effects on Amygdala and Salience Resting-State Networks in Women with Previous Affective Side Effects on the Pill.
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2018 (English)In: Neuropsychopharmacology, ISSN 0893-133X, E-ISSN 1740-634X, Vol. 43, no 3, p. 555-563Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The mechanisms linking ovarian hormones to negative affect are poorly characterized, but important clues may come from the examination of the brain's intrinsic organization. Here, we studied the effects of both the menstrual cycle and oral contraceptives (OCs) on amygdala and salience network resting-state functional connectivity using a double-blind, randomized, and placebo-controlled design. Hormone levels, depressive symptoms, and resting-state functional connectivity were measured in 35 healthy women (24.9±4.2 years) who had previously experienced OC-related negative affect. All participants were examined in the follicular phase of a baseline cycle and in the third week of the subsequent cycle during treatment with either a combined OC (30 μg ethinyl estradiol/0.15 mg levonorgestrel) or placebo. The latter time point targeted the midluteal phase in placebo users and steady-state ethinyl estradiol and levonorgestrel concentrations in OC users. Amygdala and salience network connectivity generally increased with both higher endogenous and synthetic hormone levels, although amygdala-parietal cortical connectivity decreased in OC users. When in the luteal phase, the naturally cycling placebo users demonstrated higher connectivity in both networks compared with the women receiving OCs. Our results support a causal link between the exogenous administration of synthetic hormones and amygdala and salience network connectivity. Furthermore, they suggest a similar, potentially stronger, association between the natural hormonal variations across the menstrual cycle and intrinsic network connectivity.

National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-333689 (URN)10.1038/npp.2017.157 (DOI)000419961500011 ()28741624 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2016-01439Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2007-1955, 2007-2116
Available from: 2017-11-16 Created: 2017-11-16 Last updated: 2018-02-14Bibliographically approved
Nelander, M., Weis, J., Bergman, L., Larsson, A., Wikström, A.-K. & Wikström, J. (2017). Cerebral Magnesium Levels in Preeclampsia; A Phosphorus Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Study. American Journal of Hypertension, 30(7), 667-672
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cerebral Magnesium Levels in Preeclampsia; A Phosphorus Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Study
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2017 (English)In: American Journal of Hypertension, ISSN 0895-7061, E-ISSN 1941-7225, Vol. 30, no 7, p. 667-672Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Magnesium sulfate (MgSO4) is used as a prophylaxis for eclamptic seizures. The exact mechanism of action is not fully established. We used phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy (31P-MRS) to investigate if cerebral magnesium (Mg2+) levels differ between women with preeclampsia, normal pregnant, and nonpregnant women.

METHODS: This cross-sectional study comprised 28 women with preeclampsia, 30 women with normal pregnancies in corresponding gestational week (range: 23-41 weeks) and 11 nonpregnant healthy controls. All women underwent 31P-MRS from the parieto-occipital region of the brain and were interviewed about cerebral symptoms. Differences between groups were assessed by analysis of variance and Tukey's post-hoc test. Correlations between Mg2+ levels and specific neurological symptoms were estimated with Spearman's rank test.

RESULTS: Mean maternal cerebral Mg2+ levels were lower in women with preeclampsia (0.12 mM ± 0.02) compared to normal pregnant controls (0.14 mM ± 0.03) (P = 0.04). Nonpregnant and normal pregnant women did not differ in Mg2+ levels. Among women with preeclampsia, lower Mg2+ levels correlated with presence of visual disturbances (P = 0.04). Plasma levels of Mg2+ did not differ between preeclampsia and normal pregnancy.

CONCLUSIONS: Women with preeclampsia have reduced cerebral Mg2+ levels, which could explain the potent antiseizure prophylactic properties of MgSO4. Within the preeclampsia group, women with visual disturbances have lower levels of Mg2+ than those without such symptoms.

Keywords
31P-magnetic resonance spectroscopy, blood pressure, eclampsia, hypertension, magnesium, magnetic resonance, preeclampsia.
National Category
Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-319608 (URN)10.1093/ajh/hpx022 (DOI)000407115100009 ()28338765 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2014-3561
Available from: 2017-04-06 Created: 2017-04-06 Last updated: 2018-02-22Bibliographically approved
Marusik, C., Frykholm, C., Ericson, K., Wikström, J. & Axelsson, O. (2017). Diagnosis of Placental Mesenchymal Dysplasia with a focus on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) [Letter to the editor]. Ultrasound in Obstetrics and Gynecology, 49(3), 410-412
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Diagnosis of Placental Mesenchymal Dysplasia with a focus on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)
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2017 (English)In: Ultrasound in Obstetrics and Gynecology, ISSN 0960-7692, E-ISSN 1469-0705, Vol. 49, no 3, p. 410-412Article in journal, Letter (Refereed) Published
National Category
Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-312400 (URN)10.1002/uog.15930 (DOI)27062337 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-01-09 Created: 2017-01-09 Last updated: 2017-11-29Bibliographically approved
Gingnell, M., Toffoletto, S., Wikström, J., Engman, J., Bannbers, E., Comasco, E. & Sundström Poromaa, I. (2017). Emotional anticipation after delivery - a longitudinal neuroimaging study of the postpartum period. Scientific Reports, 7, Article ID 114.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Emotional anticipation after delivery - a longitudinal neuroimaging study of the postpartum period
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2017 (English)In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 7, article id 114Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Neuroimaging research has begun to unveil the mechanisms behind emotion processing during the postpartum period, which, in turn, may be of relevance for the development of postpartum depression. The present study sought to longitudinally investigate the neural correlates of emotion anticipation during the postpartum period in healthy women. Functional magnetic resonance imaging was employed to measure the blood oxygen level-dependent signal in the brain in response to anticipation of negative emotional stimuli and during processing of images with positive or negative valence. The participating women were scanned twice: the first scan occurred during the first 48 hours after delivery, and the second was performed 4-6 weeks after delivery. The early postpartum period was characterized by higher anterior cingulate cortex reactivity during anticipation of negative emotional stimuli than the late postpartum period. This was accompanied by a negative relationship with insular reactivity during the early postpartum period and a trend towards an increase in insular reactivity in the late postpartum period. Thus, during the first four weeks of the postpartum period, a diminished top-down regulatory feedback on emotion-related areas of the brain was noted. This finding suggests a physiologically important adaptation during the healthy postpartum period.

National Category
Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-319610 (URN)10.1038/s41598-017-00146-3 (DOI)000425860900001 ()28273912 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, K2014-54-20642-07-4
Available from: 2017-04-06 Created: 2017-04-06 Last updated: 2018-05-04Bibliographically approved
Abu Hamdeh, S., Marklund, N., Lannsjö, M., Howells, T., Raininko, R., Wikström, J. & Enblad, P. (2017). Extended anatomical grading in diffuse axonal injury using MRI: Hemorrhagic lesions in the substantia nigra and mesencephalic tegmentum indicate poor long-term outcome. Journal of Neurotrauma, 5(34), 341-352
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Extended anatomical grading in diffuse axonal injury using MRI: Hemorrhagic lesions in the substantia nigra and mesencephalic tegmentum indicate poor long-term outcome
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2017 (English)In: Journal of Neurotrauma, ISSN 0897-7151, E-ISSN 1557-9042, Vol. 5, no 34, p. 341-352Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Clinical outcome after traumatic diffuse axonal injury (DAI) is difficult to predict. In this study, three magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences were used to quantify the anatomical distribution of lesions, to grade DAI according to the Adams grading system, and to evaluate the value of lesion localization in combination with clinical prognostic factors to improve outcome prediction. Thirty patients (mean 31.2 years ±14.3 standard deviation) with severe DAI (Glasgow Motor Score [GMS] <6) examined with MRI within 1 week post-injury were included. Diffusion-weighted (DW), T2*-weighted gradient echo and susceptibility-weighted (SWI) sequences were used. Extended Glasgow outcome score was assessed after 6 months. Number of DW lesions in the thalamus, basal ganglia, and internal capsule and number of SWI lesions in the mesencephalon correlated significantly with outcome in univariate analysis. Age, GMS at admission, GMS at discharge, and low proportion of good monitoring time with cerebral perfusion pressure <60 mm Hg correlated significantly with outcome in univariate analysis. Multivariate analysis revealed an independent relation with poor outcome for age (p = 0.005) and lesions in the mesencephalic region corresponding to substantia nigra and tegmentum on SWI (p  = 0.008). We conclude that higher age and lesions in substantia nigra and mesencephalic tegmentum indicate poor long-term outcome in DAI. We propose an extended MRI classification system based on four stages (stage I—hemispheric lesions, stage II—corpus callosum lesions, stage III—brainstem lesions, and stage IV—substantia nigra or mesencephalic tegmentum lesions); all are subdivided by age (≥/<30 years).

Keywords
adult brain injury, axonal injury, head trauma, MRI, susceptibility weighted imaging
National Category
Clinical Medicine Neurology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-309038 (URN)10.1089/neu.2016.4426 (DOI)000391754800009 ()27356857 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-12-01 Created: 2016-12-01 Last updated: 2018-02-19Bibliographically approved
Vågberg, M., Axelsson, M., Birgander, R., Burman, J., Cananau, C., Forslin, Y., . . . Wikström, J. (2017). Guidelines for the use of magnetic resonance imaging in diagnosing and monitoring the treatment of multiple sclerosis: recommendations of the Swedish Multiple Sclerosis Association and the Swedish Neuroradiological Society. Acta Neurologica Scandinavica, 135(1), 17-24
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Guidelines for the use of magnetic resonance imaging in diagnosing and monitoring the treatment of multiple sclerosis: recommendations of the Swedish Multiple Sclerosis Association and the Swedish Neuroradiological Society
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2017 (English)In: Acta Neurologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6314, E-ISSN 1600-0404, Vol. 135, no 1, p. 17-24Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is associated with inflammatory lesions in the brain and spinal cord. The detection of such inflammatory lesions using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is important in the consideration of the diagnosis and differential diagnoses of MS, as well as in the monitoring of disease activity and predicting treatment efficacy. Although there is strong evidence supporting the use of MRI for both the diagnosis and monitoring of disease activity, there is a lack of evidence regarding which MRI protocols to use, the frequency of examinations, and in what clinical situations to consider MRI examination. A national workshop to discuss these issues was held in Stockholm, Sweden, in August 2015, which resulted in a Swedish consensus statement regarding the use of MRI in the care of individuals with MS. The aim of this consensus statement is to provide practical advice for the use of MRI in this setting. The recommendations are based on a review of relevant literature and the clinical experience of workshop attendees. It is our hope that these recommendations will benefit individuals with MS and guide healthcare professionals responsible for their care.

National Category
Neurology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-302738 (URN)10.1111/ane.12667 (DOI)000389421400002 ()27558404 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-09-08 Created: 2016-09-08 Last updated: 2017-11-21Bibliographically approved
Ali, Z., Zulfiqar, S., Klar, J., Wikström, J., Ullah, F., Khan, A., . . . Dahl, N. (2017). Homozygous GRID2 missense mutation predicts a shift in the D-serine binding domain of GluD2 in a case with generalized brain atrophy and unusual clinical features. BMC Medical Genetics, 18(1), Article ID 144.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Homozygous GRID2 missense mutation predicts a shift in the D-serine binding domain of GluD2 in a case with generalized brain atrophy and unusual clinical features
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2017 (English)In: BMC Medical Genetics, ISSN 1471-2350, E-ISSN 1471-2350, Vol. 18, no 1, article id 144Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Spinocerebellar ataxias comprise a large and heterogeneous group of disorders that may present with isolated ataxia, or ataxia in combination with other neurologic or non-neurologic symptoms. Monoallelic or biallelic GRID2 mutations were recently reported in rare cases with cerebellar syndrome and variable degree of ataxia, ocular symptoms, hypotonia and developmental delay.

CASE PRESENTATION: We report on a consanguineous family with autosomal recessive childhood onset of slowly progressive cerebellar ataxia and delayed psychomotor development in three siblings. MRI of an adult and affected family member revealed slightly widened cerebral and cerebellar sulci, suggesting generalized brain atrophy, and mild cerebellar atrophy. Using whole exome sequencing we identified a novel homozygous missense variant [c.2128C > T, p.(Arg710Trp)] in GRID2 that segregates with the disease. The missense variant is located in a conserved region encoding the extracellular serine-binding domain of the GluD2 protein and predicts a change in conformation of the protein.

CONCLUSION: The widespread supratentorial brain abnormalities, absence of oculomotor symptoms, increased peripheral muscle tone and the novel missense mutation add to the clinical and genetic variability in GRID2 associated cerebellar syndrome. The neuroradiological findings in our family indicate a generalized neurodegenerative process to be taken into account in other families segregating complex clinical features and GRID2 mutations.

Keywords
3D protein modeling, Cerebellar syndrome, Cerebral atrophy, Developmental delay, GRID2 gene, GluD2, Mutation, Whole exome sequencing
National Category
Medical Genetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-336718 (URN)10.1186/s12881-017-0504-6 (DOI)000417599400001 ()29207948 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2015-02424Science for Life Laboratory - a national resource center for high-throughput molecular bioscience
Note

Zafar Ali, Shumaila Zulfiqar and Joakim Klar contributed equally

Available from: 2017-12-15 Created: 2017-12-15 Last updated: 2018-03-07Bibliographically approved
Wikström, J., Isacsson, U., Bengt, J. & Lennernäs, B. (2017). Magnetic Resonance Compatibility of a Transponder Aimed for Radiotherapy Positioning – A Phantom Study. Anticancer Research, 37(9), 4993-4996
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Magnetic Resonance Compatibility of a Transponder Aimed for Radiotherapy Positioning – A Phantom Study
2017 (English)In: Anticancer Research, ISSN 0250-7005, E-ISSN 1791-7530, Vol. 37, no 9, p. 4993-4996Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background/Aim: Electromagnetic Positioning Systems (EMP) is a new position-ing technique in four-dimensional radiotherapy. Patients with implanted transponders may be referred for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) making it important to establish the MR safety.

Materials and Methods: Oranges were prepared with transponders and imaged on a 3T MR scanner with different sequences. Computed tomography (CT) was performed as comparison. MR artifacts were assessed. An estimation of the maximum transponder de-flection force and heating was made.

Results: The mean measured displacement of transponders was 0.1 mm (range=0.03-0.3 mm). Artifacts were observed adjacent to transponders using all sequences. The deflection force on the transponder in the gantry was less than 38 mN. No heating was observed.

Conclusion: The absence of any substantial movement, the weak measured deflection force and absence of observed heating speaks for the safe use of MR imaging with transponder 3T. Local artefacts makes evaluation impossible adjacent to transponders.

Keywords
Prostate cancer, electromagnetic positioning, four dimensional radiotherapy
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences Cancer and Oncology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-333690 (URN)10.21873/anticanres.11911 (DOI)000412578200034 ()28870923 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-11-16 Created: 2017-11-16 Last updated: 2018-01-12Bibliographically approved
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