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Kamali-Moghaddam, MasoodORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-1303-2218
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 63) Show all publications
Herr, A. E., Kitamori, T., Landegren, U. & Kamali-Moghaddam, M. (2019). Next wave advances in single-cell analyses. The Analyst, 144(3), 735-737
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Next wave advances in single-cell analyses
2019 (English)In: The Analyst, ISSN 0003-2654, E-ISSN 1364-5528, Vol. 144, no 3, p. 735-737Article in journal, Editorial material (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ROYAL SOC CHEMISTRY, 2019
National Category
Analytical Chemistry Physical Chemistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-377491 (URN)10.1039/c9an90011j (DOI)000457394400001 ()30656308 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-02-20 Created: 2019-02-20 Last updated: 2019-02-20Bibliographically approved
Siart, B., de Oliveira, F. M., Shen, Q., Björkesten, J., Pekar, T., Steinborn, R., . . . Wallner, B. (2019). Protein measurements in venous plasma, earlobe capillary plasma and in plasma stored on filter paper. Analytical Biochemistry, 566, 146-150
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Protein measurements in venous plasma, earlobe capillary plasma and in plasma stored on filter paper
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2019 (English)In: Analytical Biochemistry, ISSN 0003-2697, E-ISSN 1096-0309, Vol. 566, p. 146-150Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this study, levels of inflammatory protein biomarkers in venous plasma, plasma derived from capillary blood from the earlobe, and capillary plasma stored as dried plasma spots (DPS) were compared. Samples from 12 male individuals were assessed with a panel of 92 inflammation-related proteins using multiplex proximity extension assay. Correlations between sample types varied greatly between analytes. A high correlation of rho > 0.8 was observed between capillary plasma and DPS for 32 analytes. At this level of correlation, 13 analytes correlated between venous and capillary plasma and 5 analytes in the comparison of venous blood with DPS.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ACADEMIC PRESS INC ELSEVIER SCIENCE, 2019
Keywords
Cytokines, Earlobe capillary, Dried plasma spots, Extension assay, Inflammation protein biomarkers
National Category
Medical Biotechnology (with a focus on Cell Biology (including Stem Cell Biology), Molecular Biology, Microbiology, Biochemistry or Biopharmacy)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-376729 (URN)10.1016/j.ab.2018.11.016 (DOI)000456354900024 ()30472219 (PubMedID)
Funder
EU, FP7, Seventh Framework Programme, 316929
Available from: 2019-02-08 Created: 2019-02-08 Last updated: 2019-02-08Bibliographically approved
Franzen, B., Alexeyenko, A., Kamali-Moghaddam, M., Hatschek, T., Kanter, L., Ramqvist, T., . . . Lewensohn, R. (2019). Protein profiling of fine-needle aspirates reveals subtype-associated immune signatures and involvement of chemokines in breast cancer. Molecular Oncology, 13(2), 376-391
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Protein profiling of fine-needle aspirates reveals subtype-associated immune signatures and involvement of chemokines in breast cancer
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2019 (English)In: Molecular Oncology, ISSN 1574-7891, E-ISSN 1878-0261, Vol. 13, no 2, p. 376-391Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

There are increasing demands for informative cancer biomarkers, accessible via minimally invasive procedures, both for initial diagnostics and for follow-up of personalized cancer therapy, including immunotherapy. Fine-needle aspiration (FNA) biopsy provides ready access to relevant tissue samples; however, the minute amounts of sample require sensitive multiplex molecular analysis to be of clinical biomarker utility. We have applied proximity extension assays (PEA) to analyze 167 proteins in FNA samples from patients with breast cancer (BC; n = 25) and benign lesions (n = 32). We demonstrate that the FNA BC samples could be divided into two main clusters, characterized by differences in expression levels of the estrogen receptor (ER) and the proliferation marker Ki67. This clustering corresponded to some extent to established BC subtypes. Our analysis also revealed several proteins whose expression levels differed between BC and benign lesions (e.g., CA9, GZMB, IL-6, VEGFA, CXCL11, PDL1, and PCD1), as well as several chemokines correlating with ER and Ki67 status (e.g., CCL4, CCL8, CCL20, CXCL8, CXCL9, and CXCL17). Finally, we also identified three signatures that could predict Ki67 status, ER status, and tumor grade, respectively, based on a small subset of proteins, which was dominated by chemokines. To our knowledge, expression profiles of CCL13 in benign lesions and BC have not previously been described but were shown herein to correlate with proliferation (P = 0.00095), suggesting a role in advanced BC. Given the broad functional range of the proteins analyzed, immune-related proteins were overrepresented among the observed alterations. Our pilot study supports the emerging role of chemokines in BC progression. Due to the minimally traumatic sampling and clinically important molecular information for therapeutic decisions, this methodology is promising for future immunoscoring and monitoring of treatment efficacy in BC.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
WILEY, 2019
Keywords
breast cancer subtypes, fibroadenomas, fine-needle aspiration, immune-related protein biomarker, proximity extension assay
National Category
Cancer and Oncology Cell and Molecular Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-377673 (URN)10.1002/1878-0261.12410 (DOI)000457747900016 ()30451357 (PubMedID)
Funder
VINNOVA, 2016-00595Swedish Foundation for Strategic Research Swedish Research CouncilEU, FP7, Seventh Framework Programme, 316929EU, FP7, Seventh Framework Programme, 294409Stockholm County Council, 20151043Stockholm County Council, 20160287Swedish Cancer Society, 170246Swedish Foundation for Strategic Research The Breast Cancer Foundation
Available from: 2019-02-25 Created: 2019-02-25 Last updated: 2019-02-25Bibliographically approved
Franzen, B., Kamali-Moghaddam, M., Alexeyenko, A., Hatschek, T., Becker, S., Wik, L., . . . Lewensohn, R. (2018). A fine-needle aspiration-based protein signature discriminates benign from malignant breast lesions. Molecular Oncology, 12(9), 1415-1428
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A fine-needle aspiration-based protein signature discriminates benign from malignant breast lesions
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2018 (English)In: Molecular Oncology, ISSN 1574-7891, E-ISSN 1878-0261, Vol. 12, no 9, p. 1415-1428Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

There are increasing demands for informative cancer biomarkers, accessible via minimally invasive procedures, both for initial diagnostics and to follow-up personalized cancer therapy. Fine-needle aspiration (FNA) biopsy provides ready access to relevant tissues; however, the minute sample amounts require sensitive multiplex molecular analysis to achieve clinical utility. We have applied proximity extension assays (PEA) and NanoString (NS) technology for analyses of proteins and of RNA, respectively, in FNA samples. Using samples from patients with breast cancer (BC, n=25) or benign lesions (n=33), we demonstrate that these FNA-based molecular analyses (a) can offer high sensitivity and reproducibility, (b) may provide correct diagnosis in shorter time and at a lower cost than current practice, (c) correlate with results from routine analysis (i.e., benchmarking against immunohistochemistry tests for ER, PR, HER2, and Ki67), and (d) may also help identify new markers related to immunotherapy. A specific 11-protein signature, including FGF binding protein 1, decorin, and furin, distinguished all cancer patient samples from all benign lesions in our main cohort and in smaller replication cohort. Due to the minimally traumatic sampling and rich molecular information, this combined proteomics and transcriptomic methodology is promising for diagnostics and evaluation of treatment efficacy in BC.

Keywords
breast cancer diagnosis, fine-needle aspiration, protein biomarker, proximity extension assay
National Category
Cancer and Oncology Cell and Molecular Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-364195 (URN)10.1002/1878-0261.12350 (DOI)000443402000002 ()30019538 (PubMedID)
Funder
VINNOVA, 201600595Swedish Research CouncilEU, FP7, Seventh Framework Programme, 316929 294409Stockholm County Council, 20151043The Breast Cancer FoundationSwedish Cancer SocietyThe Cancer Research Funds of Radiumhemmet
Available from: 2018-10-29 Created: 2018-10-29 Last updated: 2018-11-16Bibliographically approved
de Oliveira, F. M., Mereiter, S., Lönn, P., Siart, B., Shen, Q., Heldin, J., . . . Kamali-Moghaddam, M. (2018). Detection of post-translational modifications using solid-phase proximity ligation assay. New Biotechnology, 45, 51-59
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Detection of post-translational modifications using solid-phase proximity ligation assay
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2018 (English)In: New Biotechnology, ISSN 1871-6784, E-ISSN 1876-4347, Vol. 45, p. 51-59Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Post-translational modifications (PTMs) regulate protein activities to help orchestrate and fine-tune cellular processes. Dysregulation of PTMs is often related with disorders and malignancies, and may serve as a precise biomarker of disease. Developing sensitive tools to measure and monitor low-abundant PTMs in tissue lysates or serum will be instrumental for opening up new PTM-based diagnostic avenues. Here, we investigate the use of solid-phase proximity ligation assay (SP-PLA) for detection of different PTMs. The assay depends on the recognition of the target protein molecule and its modification by three affinity binders. Using antibodies and lectins, we applied the method for detection of glycosylated CD44 and E-Cadherin, and phosphorylated p53 and EGFR. The assay was found to have superior dynamic range and limit of detection compared to standard ELISAs. In summary, we have established the use of SP-PLA as an appropriate method for sensitive detection of PTMs in lysates and sera, which may provide a basis for future PTM-based diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers

National Category
Medical Biotechnology (with a focus on Cell Biology (including Stem Cell Biology), Molecular Biology, Microbiology, Biochemistry or Biopharmacy)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-334520 (URN)10.1016/j.nbt.2017.10.005 (DOI)000441913800008 ()29101055 (PubMedID)
Funder
EU, FP7, Seventh Framework Programme, 316929
Available from: 2017-11-23 Created: 2017-11-23 Last updated: 2018-10-05Bibliographically approved
Bhandage, A. K., Jin, Z., Korol, S. V., Shen, Q., Pei, Y., Deng, Q., . . . Birnir, B. (2018). GABA Regulates Release of Inflammatory Cytokines From Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells and CD4+ T Cells and Is Immunosuppressive in Type 1 Diabetes. EBioMedicine, 30, 283-294
Open this publication in new window or tab >>GABA Regulates Release of Inflammatory Cytokines From Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells and CD4+ T Cells and Is Immunosuppressive in Type 1 Diabetes
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2018 (English)In: EBioMedicine, ISSN 0360-0637, E-ISSN 2352-3964, Vol. 30, p. 283-294Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The neurotransmitter γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is an extracellular signaling molecule in the brain and in pancreatic islets. Here, we demonstrate that GABA regulates cytokine secretion from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and CD4+ T cells. In anti-CD3 stimulated PBMCs, GABA (100nM) inhibited release of 47 cytokines in cells from patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D), but only 16 cytokines in cells from nondiabetic (ND) individuals. CD4+ T cells from ND individuals were grouped into responder or non-responder T cells according to effects of GABA (100nM, 500nM) on the cell proliferation. In the responder T cells, GABA decreased proliferation, and inhibited secretion of 37 cytokines in a concentration-dependent manner. In the non-responder T cells, GABA modulated release of 8 cytokines. GABA concentrations in plasma from T1D patients and ND individuals were correlated with 10 cytokines where 7 were increased in plasma of T1D patients. GABA inhibited secretion of 5 of these cytokines from both T1D PBMCs and ND responder T cells. The results identify GABA as a potent regulator of both Th1- and Th2-type cytokine secretion from human PBMCs and CD4+ T cells where GABA generally decreases the secretion.

Keywords
PBMCs, Immune cells, Proliferation, Cytokine, GABAA receptor, Diabetes, T1D, Autoimmune disease, T cell
National Category
Other Medical Sciences not elsewhere specified Endocrinology and Diabetes
Research subject
Biology; Physiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-348232 (URN)10.1016/j.ebiom.2018.03.019 (DOI)000430303000033 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2015-02417Swedish Diabetes AssociationSwedish Child Diabetes FoundationEXODIAB - Excellence of Diabetes Research in Sweden
Available from: 2018-04-11 Created: 2018-04-11 Last updated: 2018-06-19Bibliographically approved
Dubois, L., Löf, L., Larsson, A., Hultenby, K., Waldenström, A., Kamali-Moghaddam, M., . . . Ronquist, K. G. (2018). Human erythrocyte-derived nanovesicles can readily be loaded with doxorubicin and act as anticancer agents. Cancer Research Frontiers, 4(1), 13-26
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Human erythrocyte-derived nanovesicles can readily be loaded with doxorubicin and act as anticancer agents
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2018 (English)In: Cancer Research Frontiers, ISSN 2328-5249, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 13-26Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: In future therapeutics new formulas are needed that assure lower doses, fewer side effects, targeted administration and protection of the drug from degradation. In a first step to fulfil the requirements defined above, we carried out an in vitro study by developing a new procedure to encapsulate drugs using native vesicles first from prostasomes and then from erythrocyte membranes known to be well tolerated. The new method for production of drug delivery vesicles utilized osmotic loading of detergent resistant membranes (DRMs).

Materials and methods: DRMs of prostasomes and prepared human erythrocyte membranes were extracted and separated in a sucrose gradient at a density of 1.10 g/mL containing 1% Triton X-100. These DRMs were characterized by electron microscopy (transmission and scanning EM) and loaded with low and high molecular compounds. PC3 prostate cancer cells were treated with doxorubicin loaded DRMs in triplicate. DAPI (nuclear fluorescent stain) was included and fluorescence microscopic pictures were taken before the cells were trypsinized and counted after 48h.

Results: The content of the well separated band was observed ultrastructurally as small spherical, double layered membrane vesicles, (DRM vesicles) which harbored hyperosmolar sucrose of the gradient. Encapsulated hyperosmolar sucrose induced a transient osmotic lysis of the DRM vesicles when suspended in isotonic buffer containing loading molecules allowing vesicular inclusion. After this proof of concept, the method was finally employed for doxorubicin loading of DRM vesicles from human erythrocytes. When incubating such vesicles with PC3 cells a complete arrest of growth was observed in sharp contrast to PC3 cells incubated with plain doxorubicin in similar conditions.

Conclusion: The present results open up new possibilities for using DRM vesicles as drug delivery vesicles.

National Category
Clinical Laboratory Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-364780 (URN)10.17980/2018.13 (DOI)
Note

Louise Dubois and Liza Löf contributed equally to this work.

Available from: 2018-11-02 Created: 2018-11-02 Last updated: 2019-01-31Bibliographically approved
Bränn, E., Fransson, E., White, R. A., Papadopoulos, F. C., Edvinsson, Å., Kamali-Moghaddam, M., . . . Skalkidou, A. (2018). Inflammatory markers in women with postpartum depressive symptoms. Journal of Neuroscience Research
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Inflammatory markers in women with postpartum depressive symptoms
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2018 (English)In: Journal of Neuroscience Research, ISSN 0360-4012, E-ISSN 1097-4547Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Postpartum depression (PPD) is a devastating disorder affecting not only more than 10% of all women giving birth, but also the baby, the family, and the society. Compiling evidence suggests the involvement of the immune system in the pathophysiology of major depression; yet, the immune response in perinatal depression is not as well studied. The aim of this study was to investigate the alterations in peripheral levels of inflammatory biomarkers in 169 Swedish women with and without depressive symptoms according to the Edinburgh postnatal depression scale or the M.I.N.I neuropsychiatric interview at eight weeks postpartum. Among the 70 markers analyzed with multiplex proximity extension assay, five were significantly elevated in women with postpartum depressive symptoms in the adjusted LASSO logistic regression analysis: Tumor necrosis factor ligand superfamily member (TRANCE) (OR-per 1 SD increase = 1.20), Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) (OR = 1.17) Interleukin (IL)-18 (OR = 1.06), Fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF-23) (OR = 1.25), and C-X-C motif chemokine 1 (CXCL1) (OR 1.11). These results indicate that women with PPD have elevated levels of some inflammatory biomarkers. It is, therefore, plausible that PPD is associated with a compromised adaptability of the immune system.

Keywords
cytokines, immune system, inflammation, maternal depression, pregnancy, protein markers
National Category
Psychiatry Immunology in the medical area Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-362471 (URN)10.1002/jnr.24312 (DOI)30252150 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 521-2013-2339Swedish Research Council, 523-2014-2342Marianne and Marcus Wallenberg Foundation, 2011-Skalkidou
Available from: 2018-10-05 Created: 2018-10-05 Last updated: 2018-12-10Bibliographically approved
Birgisson, H., Tsimogiannis, K., Freyhult, E. & Kamali-Moghaddam, M. (2018). Plasma Protein Profiling Reveal Osteoprotegerin as a Marker of Prognostic Impact for Colorectal Cancer. Translational Oncology, 11(4), 1034-1043
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Plasma Protein Profiling Reveal Osteoprotegerin as a Marker of Prognostic Impact for Colorectal Cancer
2018 (English)In: Translational Oncology, ISSN 1944-7124, E-ISSN 1936-5233, Vol. 11, no 4, p. 1034-1043Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Due to difficulties in predicting recurrences in colorectal cancer stages II and III, reliable prognostic biomarkers could be a breakthrough for individualized treatment and follow-up. OBJECTIVE: To find potential prognostic protein biomarkers in colorectal cancer, using the proximity extension assays. METHODS: A panel of 92 oncology-related proteins was analyzed with proximity extension assays, in plasma from a cohort of 261 colorectal cancer patients with stage II-IV. The survival analyses were corrected for disease stage and age, and the recurrence analyses were corrected for disease stage. The significance threshold was adjusted for multiple comparisons. RESULTS: The plasma proteins expression levels had a greater prognostic relevance in disease stage III colorectal cancer than in disease stage II, and for overall survival than for time to recurrence. Osteoprotegerin was the only biomarker candidate in the protein panel that had a statistical significant association with overall survival (P = .00029). None of the proteins were statistically significantly associated with time to recurrence. CONCLUSIONS: Of the 92 analyzed plasma proteins, osteoprotegerin showed the strongest prognostic impact in patients with colorectal cancer, and therefore osteoprotegerin is a potential predictive marker, and it also could be a target for treatments.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ELSEVIER SCIENCE INC, 2018
National Category
Cancer and Oncology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-361500 (URN)10.1016/j.tranon.2018.05.012 (DOI)000438977600023 ()29982101 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Cancer Society
Available from: 2018-09-28 Created: 2018-09-28 Last updated: 2018-09-28Bibliographically approved
Lindblom, R. P., Shen, Q., Axén, S., Landegren, U., Kamali-Moghaddam, M. & Thelin, S. (2018). Protein Profiling in Serum and Cerebrospinal Fluid Following Complex Surgery on the Thoracic Aorta Identifies Biological Markers of Neurologic Injury.. Journal of Cardiovascular Translational Research, 11(6), 503-516
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Protein Profiling in Serum and Cerebrospinal Fluid Following Complex Surgery on the Thoracic Aorta Identifies Biological Markers of Neurologic Injury.
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2018 (English)In: Journal of Cardiovascular Translational Research, ISSN 1937-5387, E-ISSN 1937-5395, Vol. 11, no 6, p. 503-516Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Surgery on the arch or descending aorta is associated with significant risk of neurological complications. As a consequence of intubation and sedation, early neurologic injury may remain unnoticed. Biomarkers to aid in the initial diagnostics could prove of great value as immediate intervention is critical. Twenty-three patients operated in the thoracic aorta with significant risk of perioperative neurological injury were included. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and serum were obtained preoperatively and in the first and second postoperative days and assessed with a panel of 92 neurological-related proteins. Three patients suffered spinal cord injury (SCI), eight delirium, and nine hallucinations. There were markers in both serum and CSF that differed between the affected and non-affected patients (SCI; IL6, GFAP, CSPG4, delirium; TR4, EZH2, hallucinations; NF1). The study identifies markers in serum and CSF that reflect the occurrence of neurologic insults following aortic surgery, which may aid in the care of these patients.

Keywords
Biomarkers, Cardiovascular surgery, Neurologic injury, Thoracic aortic disease
National Category
Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-369702 (URN)10.1007/s12265-018-9835-8 (DOI)000453355000007 ()30367354 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-12-16 Created: 2018-12-16 Last updated: 2019-01-15Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-1303-2218

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