uu.seUppsala University Publications
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Publications (10 of 21) Show all publications
Brounéus, K. (2019). Truth and Reconciliation Commission Processes: Learning from the Solomon Islands. London: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Truth and Reconciliation Commission Processes: Learning from the Solomon Islands
2019 (English)Book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

After war, does truth telling lead to more peaceful attitudes between former enemies? This book is the first to study the over-time effect of a Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) process on people’s attitudes towards peace. Focusing on the Solomon Islands TRC process, one of the least known or studied TRC processes in the world, and using surveys, focus groups and in depth interviews, the book reveals some critical issues for peacebuilding. For example, while support of the TRC was consistently quite strong over the two years of the study, there was a sharp decline in trust in the process as well as a significant increase in distrust and suspicion towards ex-combatants over the two-year period. The book shows that the ex-combatants did not feel safe to tell the truth in the TRC and had therefore decided beforehand what to say in the hearings. A systematic telling of untruths thereby took place, severely undermining relationships and peacebuilding in the country. The book weaves the findings from the Solomon Islands with experiences of other post-conflict truth telling process around the world, and suggests practical guidelines for future TRC processes after war.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, 2019. p. 142
Series
Peace and Security in the 21st Century Series
Keywords
Truth and Reconciliation Commissions, TRCs, Solomon Islands, transitional justice, post-conflict peace-building, peace-building attitudes, trust after war, ex-combatants, psychological health after war, post-conflict coexistence.
National Category
Social Sciences
Research subject
Peace and Conflict Research
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-366302 (URN)9781786605672 (ISBN)9781786605665 (ISBN)
Available from: 2018-11-19 Created: 2018-11-19 Last updated: 2019-01-09Bibliographically approved
Bjarnegård, E., Brounéus, K. & Melander, E. (2019). Violent Boyhoods, Masculine Honor Ideology, and Political Violence: Survey Findings From Thailand. Journal of Interpersonal Violence, 1-25
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Violent Boyhoods, Masculine Honor Ideology, and Political Violence: Survey Findings From Thailand
2019 (English)In: Journal of Interpersonal Violence, ISSN 0886-2605, E-ISSN 1552-6518, p. 1-25Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Throughout history, those who have participated in political violence have predominantly been male young adults. At the same time, we know that most young men will not use violence for political protest. So what distinguishes those who do from those who do not? In this article, we link psychological research on the intergenerational effects of violence in the family to violence in the political arena. We ask to what extent experiences of violence as a child are associated with participation in political violence as an adult. Our overarching argument is that family-of-origin violence may not only have serious negative, intergenerational effects on health and well-being but also on future spirals of violence for the individual. Family-of-origin violence may also lead to an increased risk of using violence for political purposes due to the diffusion of violence norms, whereby violence is seen as a just and appropriate response to conflict. We test this claim using micro-level data from the Survey on Gender, Politics, and Violence in Thailand, conducted in 2012-2013. For our analyses, we zoom in on men from a specific cluster sample of the survey: 200 political activist interviewees—100 Red Shirts and 100 Yellow Shirts. The results support our claim. We find that experiences of family violence as a child increase the risk of participating in political violence as an adult among male political activists in Thailand. Our study suggests one imperative policy implication: Violence prevention measures at the individual level—against corporal punishment of children or violence against women—may have critical implications also for decreasing the risk for and prevalence of political violence and armed conflict in society.

Keywords
violence exposure, children exposed to domestic violence, domestic violence, political violence, child abuse, intergenerational transmission of trauma
National Category
Other Social Sciences not elsewhere specified
Research subject
Peace and Conflict Research
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-378404 (URN)10.1177/0886260519832926 (DOI)30827140 (PubMedID)
Funder
Riksbankens Jubileumsfond, M10-0100:1
Available from: 2019-03-05 Created: 2019-03-05 Last updated: 2019-05-15Bibliographically approved
Guthrey, H. L. & Brounéus, K. (2018). The Challenge of Reconciling Tradition with Truth and Reconciliation Commission Processes: The Case of Solomon Islands. In: Madhav Joshi, Peter Wallensteen (Ed.), Understanding Quality Peace: Peacebuilding after Civil War. Abingdon: Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Challenge of Reconciling Tradition with Truth and Reconciliation Commission Processes: The Case of Solomon Islands
2018 (English)In: Understanding Quality Peace: Peacebuilding after Civil War / [ed] Madhav Joshi, Peter Wallensteen, Abingdon: Routledge, 2018Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Abingdon: Routledge, 2018
National Category
Political Science (excluding Public Administration Studies and Globalisation Studies)
Research subject
Peace and Conflict Research
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-364768 (URN)9781138307681 (ISBN)
Available from: 2018-11-02 Created: 2018-11-02 Last updated: 2019-04-10Bibliographically approved
Bjarnegård, E., Brounéus, K. & Melander, E. (2017). Honor and Political Violence: Micro-level findings from a Survey in Thailand. Journal of Peace Research, 54(6), 748-761
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Honor and Political Violence: Micro-level findings from a Survey in Thailand
2017 (English)In: Journal of Peace Research, ISSN 0022-3433, E-ISSN 1460-3578, Vol. 54, no 6, p. 748-761Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Who participates in political violence? In this study, we investigate the issue at the micro-level, comparing individuals who have used violence in political uprising with those who have not. We develop our argument from the observation that men are strongly overrepresented in political violence, although most men do not participate. Literature on masculinities emphasizes the role of honor and its links to different forms of violence, such as domestic abuse, criminal violence, and violent attitudes. Building on this literature, we discern two separate but related aspects of honor: honor as male societal privilege and control over female sexuality, i.e., patriarchal values, and honor as ideals of masculine toughness, i.e., the perceived necessity for men to be fierce and respond to affronts with violence or threats of violence in order to preserve status. We argue that patriarchal values combined with ideals of masculine toughness together constitute honor ideology, which contributes in turn to the explanation of who participates in political violence. We present new and unique individual-level survey data on these issues, collected in Thailand. We find that honor ideology strongly and robustly predicts a higher likelihood of participating in political violence among male political activists. A number of previous studies find a macro-level relationship between gender equality and peacefulness in a society. This study provides evidence for one micro-level mechanism linking gender equality and political violence at the macro-level. Based on these results, we conclude that honor ideology endorsement is a driver of violence in political conflicts.

Keywords
honor, political violence, masculinities, Thailand, gender, survey
National Category
Other Social Sciences
Research subject
Peace and Conflict Research
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-321190 (URN)10.1177/0022343317711241 (DOI)000414782900002 ()
Projects
The East Asian Peace Program
Funder
Riksbankens Jubileumsfond, M10-0100:1
Available from: 2017-05-02 Created: 2017-05-02 Last updated: 2018-02-16Bibliographically approved
Brounéus, K., Forsberg, E., Dyrstad, K. & Malmin Binningsbø, H. (2017). The Gendered Links between War-Related Trauma and Attitudes to Peace: Exploring Survey Data from Guatemala, Nepal, and Northern Ireland. In: : . Paper presented at ISA 2017, International Studies Association,February 22-25, 2017, Baltimore, USA.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Gendered Links between War-Related Trauma and Attitudes to Peace: Exploring Survey Data from Guatemala, Nepal, and Northern Ireland
2017 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

While some studies suggest that women hold more peaceful attitudes than man, few studies have explored this question in the context of post-conflict countries. We argue that women, in this context, may in fact hold more negative views regarding attitudes of relevance for peacebuilding, for three reasons. First, the ways in which women are negatively affected by armed conflict are generally not sufficiently prioritized in the post-conflict period. Second, women and men are often subjected to different types of violence during armed conflict and the types of violence affecting women may to a larger extent carry stigma. Third, women are more likely to develop PTSD after traumatic events. These three factors all lead us to expect women to hold more negative towards peacebuilding. We explore these interconnections using data from a survey fielded in three post-conflict countries: Guatemala, Nepal, and Northern Ireland. Our preliminary analysis indicates support for our proposition, as women, for instance, are less positive than men towards truth-telling initiatives, less willing to allow refugees and ex-combatants return to their homes, and less likely to support amnesties.

National Category
Political Science (excluding Public Administration Studies and Globalisation Studies)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-338126 (URN)
Conference
ISA 2017, International Studies Association,February 22-25, 2017, Baltimore, USA
Funder
Swedish Research Council
Available from: 2018-01-08 Created: 2018-01-08 Last updated: 2018-02-26Bibliographically approved
Brounéus, K. (2016). Truth for peace?: Exploring the links between the Solomon Islands' TRC process and people's attitudes towards peace. University of Otago, National Centre for Peace and Conflict Studies
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Truth for peace?: Exploring the links between the Solomon Islands' TRC process and people's attitudes towards peace
2016 (English)Report (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

This report presents results from a research project that studied the links between the Solomon Islands Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC)and the country’s peace building process.The aim of the research was to study the effects of the TRC process on people’s attitudes towards issues that are important for peace, for example trust, coexistence, the TRC, and ex-combatants. A total of around 1,900 Solomon Islanders participated in the research, insurveys, focus groups and in-depth interviews in 2011 and 2013. The project was conducted with support from the Solomon Islands TRC, Ministry of Education and Human Resource Development, and Ministry of Peace, Unity and Reconciliation. The New Zealand Tearfund and the Royal Society of New Zealand’s Marsden Fund funded the project. The fieldwork was conducted in collaboration with Pasifiki Ltd, Honiara. In this report, the main results of the study are summarised. Hopefully, the findings may be of use to Solomon Islands Ministries, Churches, NGOs and others working with peace building in the Solomon Islands.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
University of Otago, National Centre for Peace and Conflict Studies, 2016. p. 63
National Category
Political Science (excluding Public Administration Studies and Globalisation Studies)
Research subject
Peace and Conflict Research
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-350906 (URN)
Available from: 2018-05-17 Created: 2018-05-17 Last updated: 2018-05-17Bibliographically approved
Bjarnegård, E., Melander, E., Bardall, G., Brounéus, K., Forsberg, E., Johansson, K., . . . Olsson, L. (2015). Gender, peace and armed conflict. In: Ian Davis (Ed.), SIPRI Yearbook 2015: Armaments, Disarmament and International Security (pp. 101-109). Oxford: Oxford University Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Gender, peace and armed conflict
Show others...
2015 (English)In: SIPRI Yearbook 2015: Armaments, Disarmament and International Security / [ed] Ian Davis, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2015, p. 101-109Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2015
National Category
Political Science (excluding Public Administration Studies and Globalisation Studies)
Research subject
Political Science; Peace and Conflict Research
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-267033 (URN)978-0-19-873781-0 (ISBN)
Available from: 2015-11-17 Created: 2015-11-17 Last updated: 2018-01-17Bibliographically approved
Brosché, J., Brounéus, K., Fjelde, H., Forsberg, E., Hegre, H., Hultman, L., . . . Wallensteen, P. (2015). Nio punkter för global fred (Nine Points for Global Peace). Uppsala: Uppsala Nya Tidning
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Nio punkter för global fred (Nine Points for Global Peace)
Show others...
2015 (Swedish)Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
Abstract [sv]

Insatserna för global fred måste stärkas skriver tolv företrädare för institutionen för freds- och konfliktforskning apropå att världens ledare samlas i dag i New York för att anta 17 nya globala mål för en bättre värld och mer hållbar utveckling.

Place, publisher, year, pages
Uppsala: Uppsala Nya Tidning, 2015
National Category
Other Social Sciences not elsewhere specified
Research subject
Peace and Conflict Research
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-331931 (URN)
Available from: 2017-10-19 Created: 2017-10-19 Last updated: 2018-06-26
Brounéus, K., Wray, M. & Green, P. (2015). Underestimating the burden for peacekeepers?: Difficulty in determining psychological well-being following operational deployment with low response rates from NZDF personnel.. Journal of military and veterans health, 23(2), 7-13
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Underestimating the burden for peacekeepers?: Difficulty in determining psychological well-being following operational deployment with low response rates from NZDF personnel.
2015 (English)In: Journal of military and veterans health, ISSN 1835-1271, E-ISSN 1839-2733, Vol. 23, no 2, p. 7-13Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Since 2010, the New Zealand Defence Force (NZDF) have used post-deployment psychological screens with personnel returning from operational deployments to predict and support psychological ill-health in returning peacekeepers.

Aim: The objective of this article is to discuss the critical implications of low return rates in follow-up psychological health data in returning peacekeepers. Due to low response rates at the 4-6 month follow up screen, longitudinal analysis of mental health could not be conducted.

Methods: Two sets of responses were analysed using logistic regression from NZDF Post-Deployment screens with personnel who had served in Timor Leste and Afghanistan over the period 2010–2011. The total sample consisted of 695 cases.

Results: This study demonstrates that peacekeeping personnel with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) scores above the cut-off at the initial screen returned the follow-up (FUP) screen to a significantly lower degree than their peers.

Conclusions: The results of this study suggest that among those who did not complete the FUP screen, there may be an over-representation of personnel with PTSD symptoms. If healthier subjects are more likely to return the FUP screen, post-deployment well-being may be skewed towards more positive mental health than is accurate, leading to an underestimation of the mental health burden for returning peacekeepers.

Keywords
Returning soldiers; Post-deployment psychological well-being; Post-deployment psychological screens; Mental health burden; International peacekeeping
National Category
Other Social Sciences
Research subject
Peace and Conflict Research
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-274522 (URN)000359985000004 ()
Available from: 2016-01-22 Created: 2016-01-22 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
Brounéus, K. (2014). On Return from Peacekeeping: A review of current research on psychological well-being in military personnel returning from operational deployment. Journal of military and veterans health, 22(1), 24-29
Open this publication in new window or tab >>On Return from Peacekeeping: A review of current research on psychological well-being in military personnel returning from operational deployment
2014 (English)In: Journal of military and veterans health, ISSN 1835-1271, E-ISSN 1839-2733, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 24-29Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Australia: Australasian Military Medicine Association, 2014
Keywords
Peacekeeping; operational deployment; psychological well-being
National Category
Social Sciences
Research subject
Peace and Conflict Research
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-248101 (URN)
Available from: 2015-03-27 Created: 2015-03-27 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-3298-8848

Search in DiVA

Show all publications