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Lagebro, Linda
Publications (10 of 10) Show all publications
Gueriau, P., Rabet, N., Clement, G., Lagebro, L., Vannier, J., Briggs, D. E. G., . . . Bethoux, O. (2016). A 365-Million-Year-Old Freshwater Community Reveals Morphological and Ecological Stasis in Branchiopod Crustaceans. Current Biology, 26(3), 383-390
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A 365-Million-Year-Old Freshwater Community Reveals Morphological and Ecological Stasis in Branchiopod Crustaceans
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2016 (English)In: Current Biology, ISSN 0960-9822, E-ISSN 1879-0445, Vol. 26, no 3, p. 383-390Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Branchiopod crustaceans are represented by fairy, tadpole, and clam shrimps (Anostraca, Notostraca, Laevicaudata, Spinicaudata), which typically inhabit temporary freshwater bodies, and water fleas (Cladoceromorpha), which live in all kinds of freshwater and occasionally marine environments [1, 2]. The earliest branchiopods occur in the Cambrian, where they are represented by complete body fossils from Sweden such as Rehbachiella kinnekullensis [3] and isolated mandibles preserved as small carbonaceous fossils [4-6] from Canada. The earliest known continental branchiopods are associated with hot spring environments [7] represented by the Early Devonian Rhynie Chert of Scotland (410 million years ago) and include possible stem-group or crown-group Anostraca, Notostraca, and clam shrimps or Cladoceromorpha [8-10], which differmorphologically fromtheirmodern counterparts [1, 2, 11]. Here we report the discovery of an ephemeral pool branchiopod community from the 365-million-year-old Strud locality of Belgium. It is characterized by new anostracans and spinicaudatans, closely resembling extant species, and the earliest notostracan, Strudops goldenbergi [12]. These branchiopods released resting eggs into the sediment in a manner similar to their modern representatives [1, 2]. We infer that this reproductive strategy was critical to overcoming environmental constraints such as seasonal desiccation imposed by living on land. The pioneer colonization of ephemeral freshwater pools by branchiopods in the Devonian was followed by remarkable ecological and morphological stasis that persists to the present day.

National Category
Geosciences, Multidisciplinary
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-279563 (URN)10.1016/j.cub.2015.12.039 (DOI)000369502900031 ()26776738 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-03-02 Created: 2016-03-02 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
Janssen, R., Jorgensen, M., Lagebro, L. & Budd, G. E. (2015). Fate and nature of the onychophoran mouth-anus furrow and its contribution to the blastopore. Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Biological Sciences, 282(1805), Article ID 20142628.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Fate and nature of the onychophoran mouth-anus furrow and its contribution to the blastopore
2015 (English)In: Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Biological Sciences, ISSN 0962-8452, E-ISSN 1471-2954, Vol. 282, no 1805, article id 20142628Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The ancestral states of bilaterian development, and which living groups have conserved them the most, has been a controversial topic in biology for well over a hundred years. In recent years, the idea that gastrulation primitively proceeded via the formation of a slit-like blastopore that then evolved into either protostomy or deuterostomy has gained renewed attention and some molecular developmental support. One of the key pieces of evidence for this 'amphistomy' theory comes from the onychophorans, which form a clear ventral groove during gastrulation. The interpretation of this structure has, however, proved problematic. Based on expression patterns of forkhead (fkh), caudal (cad), brachyury (bra) and wingless (wg/Wnt1), we show that this groove does not correspond to the blastopore, even though both the mouth and anus later develop from it. Rather, the posterior pit appears to be the blastopore; the posterior of the groove later fuses with it to form the definitive anus. Onychophoran development therefore represents a case of 'concealed' deuterostomy. The new data from the onychophorans thus remove one of the key pieces of evidence for the amphistomy theory. Rather, in line with other recent results, it suggests that ancestral bilaterian development was deuterostomic.

Keywords
Onychophora, early development, gene expression, amphistomy
National Category
Biological Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-251968 (URN)10.1098/rspb.2014.2628 (DOI)000351770200007 ()
Available from: 2015-05-18 Created: 2015-04-28 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
Lagebro, L. (2015). The Arthropod Assemblage of the Upper Devonian Strud locality and its Ecology. (Doctoral dissertation). Uppsala: Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Arthropod Assemblage of the Upper Devonian Strud locality and its Ecology
2015 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The Devonian (419-359 million years ago) is the geological period when the terrestrial biota fully established. Early representatives from a terrestrial and continental aquatic biota have previously been reported from the Upper Devonian (Famennian) Strud quarry in Belgium, in the shape of seed-bearing plants and vertebrates (fish and early tetrapods). The palaeoenvironment is interpreted as a floodplain with slow accumulation of sediment in the river channels and adjacent shallow pools, subject to seasonal flooding and desiccation. This thesis presents the upper Famennian Strud ecosystem with representatives from the largest animal phylum – the Arthropoda. Pancrustaceans are dominating the arthropod assemblage by two eumalacostracans (previously described), three groups of branchiopods, and a putative insect, all collected in fine shales likely deposited in the shallow pools. The branchiopods from Strud comprise new members from all three extant clades, i.e. notostracans, anostracans, and spinicaudatan diplostracans. The notostracan Strudops goldenbergi is remarkable for its close resemblance with the extant genus Triops by the overall body plan and telson morphology. A phylogenetic analysis including modern and extinct notostracans and anostracans was performed, where Strudops appears as the earliest undisputed notostracan ever found. In addition, new genera of Anostraca (Haltinnaias serrata) and Spinicaudata (Gesvestheria pernegrei) are described herein. The insect Strudiella devonica consists of a single specimen and is interpreted to have been a nymph due to its minute size and wingless appearance. The chelicerates are represented by one or several species of eurypterids. So far unnamed juvenile eurypterid remains have also been found within the pool strata, and fragments of adult individuals in the coarser river deposits. The branchiopod community displays a unique insight to the ecosystem that these crustaceans inhabited. This is partly because of their co-occurrence, but mainly because they are preserved in close association to draught-resistant encysted eggs, in the same manner as modern day branchiopods do to survive and disperse during periods of drought and freezing. Altogether, the arthropod assemblage offers insight to Late Devonian freshwater ecosystems, and provides further understanding of the evolution of respective groups.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Uppsala: Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis, 2015. p. 41
Series
Digital Comprehensive Summaries of Uppsala Dissertations from the Faculty of Science and Technology, ISSN 1651-6214 ; 1245
Keywords
Branchiopoda, Hexapoda, Eurypterida, Strud, Famennian, ephemeral pool
National Category
Natural Sciences
Research subject
Earth Science with specialization in Historical Geology and Palaeontology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-248153 (URN)978-91-554-9222-9 (ISBN)
Public defence
2015-05-22, Axel Hambergsalen, Villavägen 16, Uppsala, 13:15 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Funder
Swedish Research Council
Available from: 2015-04-28 Created: 2015-03-28 Last updated: 2015-07-07
Lagebro, L., Gueriau, P., Hegna, T. A., Rabet, N., Butler, A. & Budd, G. E. (2015). The oldest notostracan (Upper Devonian Strud locality, Belgium). Palaeontology, 58(3), 497-509
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The oldest notostracan (Upper Devonian Strud locality, Belgium)
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2015 (English)In: Palaeontology, ISSN 0031-0239, E-ISSN 1475-4983, Vol. 58, no 3, p. 497-509Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A new notostracan crustacean, Strudops goldenbergi gen. et sp. nov., is described from the well-preserved terrestrial arthropod fauna of the Upper Devonian of Strud, Belgium. The fossil notostracan bears a close resemblance to modern notostracans in possessing a large, simple head shield covering almost half of the whole body, a set of phyllopodous thoracic appendages and a legless posterior abdomen with a telson bearing a caudal furca. The differentiation and relative size of mouthparts and limbs suggest that these specimens are all adults. The notostracans described herein are the earliest clear members of the total group Notostraca.

National Category
Geology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-247753 (URN)10.1111/pala.12155 (DOI)000353398000006 ()
Available from: 2015-03-23 Created: 2015-03-23 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
Garrouste, R., Clement, G., Nel, P., Engel, M. S., Grandcolas, P., D'Haese, C. A., . . . Nel, A. (2013). Is Strudiella a Devonian insect?: Reply [Letter to the editor]. Nature, 494(7437), E4-E5
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Is Strudiella a Devonian insect?: Reply
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2013 (English)In: Nature, ISSN 0028-0836, E-ISSN 1476-4687, Vol. 494, no 7437, p. E4-E5Article in journal, Letter (Refereed) Published
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-219280 (URN)10.1038/nature11888 (DOI)000315312900051 ()
Available from: 2014-02-27 Created: 2014-02-25 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Garrouste, R., Clement, G., Nel, P., Engel, M. S., Grandcolas, P., D'Haese, C., . . . Nel, A. (2012). A complete insect from the Late Devonian period. Nature, 488(7409), 82-85
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A complete insect from the Late Devonian period
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2012 (English)In: Nature, ISSN 0028-0836, E-ISSN 1476-4687, Vol. 488, no 7409, p. 82-85Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

After terrestrialization, the diversification of arthropods and vertebrates is thought to have occurred in two distinct phases(1), the first between the Silurian and the Frasnian stages (Late Devonian period) (425-385 million years (Myr) ago), and the second characterized by the emergence of numerous new major taxa, during the Late Carboniferous period (after 345 Myr ago). These two diversification periods bracket the depauperate vertebrate Romer's gap (360-345 Myr ago) and arthropod gap (385-325 Myr ago)(1), which could be due to preservational artefact(2,3). Although a recent molecular dating has given an age of 390 Myr for the Holometabola(4), the record of hexapods during the Early-Middle Devonian (411.5-391 Myr ago, Pragian to Givetian stages) is exceptionally sparse and based on fragmentary remains, which hinders the timing of this diversification. Indeed, although Devonian Archaeognatha are problematic(5,6), the Pragian of Scotland has given some Collembola and the incomplete insect Rhyniognatha, with its diagnostic dicondylic, metapterygotan mandibles(5,7). The oldest, definitively winged insects are from the Serpukhovian stage (latest Early Carboniferous period)(8). Here we report the first complete Late Devonian insect, which was probably a terrestrial species. Its 'orthopteroid' mandibles are of an omnivorous type, clearly not modified for a solely carnivorous diet. This discovery narrows the 45-Myr gap in the fossil record of Hexapoda, and demonstrates [GRAPHICS] further a first Devonian phase of diversification for the Hexapoda, as in vertebrates, and suggests that the Pterygota diversified before and during Romer's gap.

National Category
Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-179552 (URN)10.1038/nature11281 (DOI)000307010700037 ()
Available from: 2012-08-20 Created: 2012-08-20 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
Lagebro, L. & Clément, G. (2011). THE ARTHROPOD FAUNA OF THE UPPER DEVONIAN TETRAPOD-BEARING LOCALITY OF STRUD, BELGIUM. In: Benjamin P. Kear and Michael Streng (Ed.), The 2nd Wiman meeting: Carl Wimans legacy: 100 years of Swedish Palaeontology. Paper presented at The 2nd Wiman meeting. Uppsala
Open this publication in new window or tab >>THE ARTHROPOD FAUNA OF THE UPPER DEVONIAN TETRAPOD-BEARING LOCALITY OF STRUD, BELGIUM
2011 (English)In: The 2nd Wiman meeting: Carl Wimans legacy: 100 years of Swedish Palaeontology / [ed] Benjamin P. Kear and Michael Streng, Uppsala, 2011Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Abstract: The Upper Devonian locality of Strud, Namur Province, Belgium, has since its discovery in 2005 yielded substantial collections of vertebrate, invertebrate and plant fossils. The locality is mostly known for its flora and vertebrate fauna, but also shows exceptional preservation of arthropods. The arthropod faunas primarily comprise of branchiopod and malacostracan crustaceans. Additionally, eurypterid remains have been found, and also assumed encysted branchiopod eggs. Here we present the branchiopod material, composed of Notostraca, Anostraca and Spinicaudata, with emphasis on the former. The specimens are embedded in silty sandstone and evaporitic dolomite. The depositional environment is interpreted as a fluvial estuary. The resting eggs indicate that the area suffered episodic desiccation, a phenomenon typical of the life cycle of modern branchiopods.

Keywords: Notostraca, Anostraca, Spinicaudata, Famennian, Belgium

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Uppsala: , 2011
National Category
Other Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-165648 (URN)
Conference
The 2nd Wiman meeting
Available from: 2012-01-09 Created: 2012-01-09 Last updated: 2013-10-29Bibliographically approved
Lagebro, L., Stein, M. & Peel, J. S.A new arthropod from the early Cambrian Sirius Passet Fauna of North Greenland.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A new arthropod from the early Cambrian Sirius Passet Fauna of North Greenland
Manuscript (Other academic)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-97598 (URN)
Available from: 2008-09-29 Created: 2008-09-29 Last updated: 2015-03-23Bibliographically approved
Lagebro, L., Gueriau, P., Edgecombe, G. D. & Budd, G. E.Stylonurine eurypterids from the Upper Devonian Strud locality, Belgium.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Stylonurine eurypterids from the Upper Devonian Strud locality, Belgium
(English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
National Category
Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-247755 (URN)
Available from: 2015-03-23 Created: 2015-03-23 Last updated: 2015-07-07
Gueriau, P., Rabet, N., CLément, G., Lagebro, L., Charbonnier, S., Olive, S. & Béthoux, O.The ephemeral pool crustacean community unchanged since the Late Devonian.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The ephemeral pool crustacean community unchanged since the Late Devonian
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(English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
National Category
Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-247754 (URN)
Available from: 2015-03-23 Created: 2015-03-23 Last updated: 2015-07-07
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