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Publications (10 of 40) Show all publications
García-Terán, J. & Skoglund, A. (2019). A Processual Approach for the Quadruple Helix Model: the Case of a Regional Project in Uppsala. Journal of the Knowledge Economy, 10(3), 1272-1296
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Processual Approach for the Quadruple Helix Model: the Case of a Regional Project in Uppsala
2019 (English)In: Journal of the Knowledge Economy, ISSN 1868-7865, E-ISSN 1868-7873, Vol. 10, no 3, p. 1272-1296Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study investigates how the quadruple helix (QH) innovation model functions in a regional renewable energy initiative in Uppsala, Sweden. The focus is on the collaboration between regional office representatives, researchers, consultants and civil society, and their involvement in the attempt to implement and commercialize an innovation within renewable energy for the renovation of an old bridge. The empirical material gathered for this study was based on interviews, conversations, and participant observation during workshops and meetings with different stakeholders. By applying a processual approach, this article illustrates how the QH configuration (university-industry-government and civil society) emerges and evolves, unfortunately into a failed collaboration and thus a closing down of a commercialization attempt. By analyzing interactions and events of the process, we discuss the coordination problems between the actors to better understand how the dynamics affect local governments’ attempts to spur a more innovative climate in the region. In our conclusion, we discuss how the processual approach, when applied, can offer a better understanding of the uncertain development of QH projects in knowledge-based societies and economies.

Keywords
Interactions, Commercialization, Entrepreneurship, Process studies, Quadruple helix
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-347758 (URN)10.1007/s13132-018-0521-5 (DOI)000479145300019 ()
Available from: 2018-04-06 Created: 2018-04-06 Last updated: 2019-09-26Bibliographically approved
Skoglund, A. (2018). Augmented Reality and Organization Studies. In: European Group of Organization Studies: . Paper presented at European Group of Organization Studies, Surprise in and around Organizations: Journeys to the Unexpected, July 5-7, Tallin, Estonia.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Augmented Reality and Organization Studies
2018 (English)In: European Group of Organization Studies, 2018Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Augmented Reality (AR) technology is supposed to enhance a version of reality by superimposing computer-generated content on a physical environment to augment it. In its infancy, AR was conceived to be obtainable with the help of a ‘virtual world that enriches, rather than replaces, the real world’ (Feiner, Macintyre, & Seligmann, 1993:54). By immersing the user in some sort of digitally construed system that creates a specific, but still flexible, genre of behaviours, AR aimed to bridge the false divide between ‘the virtual’ and ‘the real’ (cf. Bell, 2007). AR technology developers have since then attempted to upgrade the human technically by amplifying the senses and make them more sensitive to that which otherwise would have been invisible, unhearable, intangible and broadly unexperienced. And in working with the so-called ‘actual environment’, AR is dependent on a production of digital objects that ’appear to human users as colourful and visible beings’ (Hui, 2012:387). It exemplifies a digital aesthetic approach that assumes that the thought and sensed can be shared with the technology and stimulated by the human and machine interaction. 

Keywords
Augmented reality, digital technology, organization
National Category
Economics and Business
Research subject
Engineering Science with specialization in industrial engineering and management
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-390561 (URN)
Conference
European Group of Organization Studies, Surprise in and around Organizations: Journeys to the Unexpected, July 5-7, Tallin, Estonia
Available from: 2019-08-12 Created: 2019-08-12 Last updated: 2019-08-29Bibliographically approved
Redmalm, D. & Skoglund, A. (2018). Bringing one’s self to work and back again: The role of surprises in alternative entrepreneurship. In: European Group of Organization Studies: . Paper presented at EGOS: Surprise in and around Organizations: Journeys to the Unexpected, July 5–7, 2018 Tallinn, Estonia.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Bringing one’s self to work and back again: The role of surprises in alternative entrepreneurship
2018 (English)In: European Group of Organization Studies, 2018Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

With the increasing realization that boundaries are constructed in relation to certain “differences” that make up an organizational “inside” in relation to its “outside”, organizational scholars have intensified their studies of how identities are hosted and managed within organizations. Less known, however, is the wish of organizations to disrupt and destabilize their members’ subjectification to the organization by inviting them to with personally challenging experiences and curated surprises. To explore this type of intentional disruptions, we study a technology company that engages in a number of social issues only loosely connected to their main product, a digital presentation tool. We especially focus on one intervention: a yearly project in which the company’s employees renovate buildings in a community where most are Roma with low socio-economic status. 

Keywords
Alternative Entrepreneurship, employee, organization, subjectivity, surprises
National Category
Economics and Business Sociology
Research subject
Engineering Science with specialization in industrial engineering and management; Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-390563 (URN)
Conference
EGOS: Surprise in and around Organizations: Journeys to the Unexpected, July 5–7, 2018 Tallinn, Estonia
Funder
Ragnar Söderbergs stiftelse, E19/14
Available from: 2019-08-12 Created: 2019-08-12 Last updated: 2019-08-12Bibliographically approved
Skoglund, A. & García-Terán, J. (2018). Studying intra-actions: A processual analysis of the Triple Helix innovation system. In: European Group of Organization Studies: . Paper presented at EGOS: Surprise in and around Organizations: Journeys to the Unexpected, sub theme 7: Doing Process Research: Performativity in the Unfolding Actions of Organizing, July 5-7, Tallin, Estonia.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Studying intra-actions: A processual analysis of the Triple Helix innovation system
2018 (English)In: European Group of Organization Studies, 2018Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Studies of innovation systems often focus their analyses on ‘interactions’ between different actors, such as governments, universities, industries and civil society, with the aim to facilitate collaborations. Due to their intellectual base in various normative models that seek economic progression, these policy driven innovation systems have nevertheless neglected interactions with non-human agents. To theorize differently on interactions in the nexus of human-non-human in the implementation of innovation systems, we thus turn to ‘intra-actions’, as suggested by Karen Barad. After a theoretical overview of how we conceptually may shift from interactions to intra-actions, we provide a few illustrative empirical examples that shed light on the possibility to analyze innovation systems with a post-human approach. We specifically look into a regional development project in Uppsala, where the renovation of a bridge is merged with the attempt to commercialize renewable energy technology via the implementation of the Quadruple Helix (QH) model. We thus make the technology part of the QH and explore how to theoretically consider the fifth helix as an actor in itself, bringing it ‘closer’ to the other intra-actors. We conclude that a shift to intra-actions furthers our understanding of the evolving relationships between human and non-human agentic matter, and the non-linear dynamism involved in innovation system collaborations. 

Keywords
Intra-actions, regional development, entrepreneurship, renewable energy, renewable energy technology, citizen participation, quadruple helix, innovation system, post-human performativity
National Category
Business Administration
Research subject
Engineering Science with specialization in industrial engineering and management
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-390562 (URN)
Conference
EGOS: Surprise in and around Organizations: Journeys to the Unexpected, sub theme 7: Doing Process Research: Performativity in the Unfolding Actions of Organizing, July 5-7, Tallin, Estonia
Available from: 2019-08-12 Created: 2019-08-12 Last updated: 2019-08-29Bibliographically approved
Skoglund, A. & Berglund, K. (2018). Studying “Openness” with “Closeness”: A videography of Prezi’s alternative entrepreneurship. Nordicom Information, 40(1), 86-90
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Studying “Openness” with “Closeness”: A videography of Prezi’s alternative entrepreneurship
2018 (English)In: Nordicom Information, ISSN 0349-5949, Vol. 40, no 1, p. 86-90Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

How can we study a company’s call for “openness” and ambition to create an alterna- tive form of entrepreneurship? This article introduces a videography of the Hungar- ian company Prezi, with a focus on their efforts to nurture an internal organisational culture defined by openness, as well as a desire to address the lack of corporate social engagement and openness in Hungarian society. We follow Prezi’s work with the Roma population to better understand how the company’s social value creation affects the employees, and to problematise how videography facilitates “closeness” and thereby the sharing of sensibility and co-experience of such an abstract ability as openness.

Keywords
Alternative Entrepreneurship, Prezi, Openness, Closeness, Human Resource Management, Organizational Culture
National Category
Business Administration Engineering and Technology
Research subject
Engineering Science with specialization in industrial engineering and management
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-356727 (URN)
Funder
Ragnar Söderbergs stiftelse
Available from: 2018-08-05 Created: 2018-08-05 Last updated: 2018-10-12Bibliographically approved
Redmalm, D. & Skoglund, A. (2018). Taking one’s self to work and back again: Alternative Entrepreneurship and Social interventions. In: : . Paper presented at Sociologidagarna, the Swedish Sociological Association Conference, March 7–9, 2018, Lund, Sweden. Lund
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Taking one’s self to work and back again: Alternative Entrepreneurship and Social interventions
2018 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Scholars have increasingly paid interest to the way companies build a brand and an office culture by encouraging employees to talk about and cultivate their creative interests and personal values within the frames of their occupation. By bringing one’s self to work the employee contributes to a creative work environment that attracts potential candidates, and that benefits economic gain. This paper focuses on how the IT-company Prezi, founded in Hungary in 2009, creates outlets for the personal dimensions that employees bring to work. Prezi attracts employees sharing liberal and cosmopolitan views who contribute to building a brand and an office culture outside-in, in sharp contrast with the surrounding society characterized by a wave of right-wing populism and nationalist sentiments in Hungary. As a consequence, employees talk of their workplace as a protected “bubble.”

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lund: , 2018
Keywords
Giorgio Agamben, Alternative Entrepreneurship, Michel Foucault, identity, information and communication technology, organizational culture, Roma, Subjectivity
National Category
Business Administration
Research subject
Sociology; Business Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-376969 (URN)
Conference
Sociologidagarna, the Swedish Sociological Association Conference, March 7–9, 2018, Lund, Sweden
Projects
Videography of "Alternative Entrepreneurship"
Funder
Ragnar Söderbergs stiftelse, E 14/19
Available from: 2019-02-12 Created: 2019-02-12 Last updated: 2019-09-26Bibliographically approved
Skoglund, A. & Redmalm, D. (2017). 'Doggy-biopolitics’: Governing via the First Dog. Organization, 24(2), 240-266
Open this publication in new window or tab >>'Doggy-biopolitics’: Governing via the First Dog
2017 (English)In: Organization, ISSN 1350-5084, E-ISSN 1461-7323, Vol. 24, no 2, p. 240-266Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Biopolitics, traditionally understood as management of the human population, has been extended to include nonhuman animal life and posthuman life. In this article, we turn to literatures that advance Foucauldian biopolitics to explore the mode of government enabled by the dog of the US presidential family – the First Dog called Bo Obama. With analytical focus on vitalisation efforts, we follow the construction of Bo in various outlets, such as the websites of the White House and an animal rights organisation. Bo’s microphysical escapades and the negotiation thereof show how contemporary biopolitics, which targets the vitality of the dog population, is linked to seductive neoliberal management techniques and subjectivities. We discuss ‘cuddly management’ in relation to Foucauldian scholarship within organisation and management studies and propose that the construction of Bo facilitates interspecies family norms and an empathic embrace of difference circumscribed by vitalisation efforts that we pinpoint as ‘doggy-biopolics'.

Keywords
Animal Studies, domestic animals, First Dog, management techniques, Michel Foucault, posthuman biopolitics, US governing
National Category
Engineering and Technology Sociology
Research subject
Engineering Science with specialization in industrial engineering and management
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-304657 (URN)10.1177/1350508416666938 (DOI)000398040100006 ()
Available from: 2016-10-06 Created: 2016-10-06 Last updated: 2017-04-25Bibliographically approved
Skoglund, A. & Redmalm, D. (2016). ‘Doggy-Biopolitics’: Governing via the First Dog. In: : . Paper presented at Sociologidagarna 2016: Överskridande sociologi, 10-12 mars..
Open this publication in new window or tab >>‘Doggy-Biopolitics’: Governing via the First Dog
2016 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Biopolitics, traditionally understood as management of the human population, has been extended to include nonhuman animal life and posthuman life. In this article we turn to these advancements of Foucauldian biopolitics to explore the mode of government enabled by the dog of the US presidential family—the First Dog called Bo Obama. We follow the construction of Bo in various outlets from well-known and less famous sources, as the websites of the White House and an animal rights organisation. Bo’s microphysical escapades in and around the White House show how posthuman biopolitics, which targets the vitality of the dog population, is linked to seductive neoliberal management techniques and subjectivities that enhance ‘cuddly management.’ Bo also facilitates a proliferation of interspecies family norms and an empathic embrace of difference. We thus suggest that Bo makes possible a mode of government nurtured by vitality, playfulness and posthuman norms, what we call ‘doggy-biopolitics.’

Keywords
Animal studies, posthuman biopolitics, Michel Foucault, First Dog, domestic animals, management techniques, US governing
National Category
Sociology Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-285900 (URN)
Conference
Sociologidagarna 2016: Överskridande sociologi, 10-12 mars.
Available from: 2016-04-20 Created: 2016-04-20 Last updated: 2017-12-19
Skoglund, A. (2016). Ecoticism. In: : . Paper presented at 11:th Organization Studies Summer Workshop on Spirituality, Symbolism and Storytelling. 21-24 May, Greece..
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Ecoticism
2016 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Ecoromanticism has been ridiculed at the same time as the last 50 years of biology has been claimed to provide us with ‘the meaning of life’ (Macleay museum, 2012). The scientification of Nature, with abstractions of Nature’s spatiality and institutionalisation of its values, also supports the current natural scientific definition of our experiential worlds.The possible trace of past poetic and erotic experiences of Nature (Emerson, 1873) in predictions of climate catastrophes (Jonas, 1984:190), the general turn to cybernetics (also see Bateson, 1979; Introduction to 'Soul and Science', 2014) and critique of determinism in far-from-equilibrium thinking (Prigogine, 1989), therefore seems important to address with contemporary realities of complexity in mind (e.g. see \ Walker and Cooper, 2011). Not least since such frameworks for understanding ‘complex systems’ and ‘patterns of life’ have been transferred to various human domains, such as organisation studies.

The bioscenic feast we have been invited to the last 50 years, and which for the moment offers us an exposure to instabilities and insecurity, could become something else than the leftovers we so far have to live on in the seemingly indissoluble congealment of a reverence for nature with a natural scientific bent. A comparison of the discursive constructions of Nature and human since Emerson (1873, 2013) can perhaps resurrect the metaphysical, prophetic and imaginative that has been withdrawn from life lived adaptively in quests for human resilience (Evans & Reid, 2014). By first tracing the accelerating scientification of Nature and its nurturing of all-encompassing biospheric life ecologically speaking, I thus end by extricating the remains of the human from the ‘biohuman’, i.e. the human targeted and vitalized as mere ‘biological being’ (Dillon & Reid, 2009:20), by resurrecting an immeasurable, self-possessive and selectively interconnected human for Ecoticism.

Keywords
Ethics, Human-nature relations, Instabilities, Natural science, Religion
National Category
Engineering and Technology Other Social Sciences
Research subject
Business Studies; Engineering Science with specialization in industrial engineering and management
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-293580 (URN)
Conference
11:th Organization Studies Summer Workshop on Spirituality, Symbolism and Storytelling. 21-24 May, Greece.
Available from: 2016-05-13 Created: 2016-05-13 Last updated: 2016-06-09
Berglund, K. & Skoglund, A. (2016). Social Entrepreneurship: To defend society from itself. In: Fayolle, Alain Riot, Philippe (Ed.), Rethinking Entrepreneurship: Debating Research Orientations. London: Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Social Entrepreneurship: To defend society from itself
2016 (English)In: Rethinking Entrepreneurship: Debating Research Orientations / [ed] Fayolle, Alain Riot, Philippe, London: Routledge , 2016Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Routledge, 2016
National Category
Social Sciences Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-266971 (URN)978-1-138-80253-7 (ISBN)
Available from: 2015-11-16 Created: 2015-11-16 Last updated: 2016-02-19
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-2898-9995

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