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Lindahl, Marcus
Publications (10 of 46) Show all publications
Sköld, D., Fornstedt, H. & Lindahl, M. (2018). Dilution of innovation utility, reinforcing the reluctance towards the new: An upstream supplier perspective on a fragmented electricity industry. Energy Policy, 116, 220-231
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Dilution of innovation utility, reinforcing the reluctance towards the new: An upstream supplier perspective on a fragmented electricity industry
2018 (English)In: Energy Policy, ISSN 0301-4215, E-ISSN 1873-6777, Vol. 116, p. 220-231Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper inquires into how a reorganization of the value chain running from client-utilities to equipment suppliers within the electricity industry has altered the conditions for diffusing/adopting technological in- novation. Through an interview-based qualitative case study of the development and diffusion of high-voltage switchgear, it provides a supplier perspective on how the downstream capacity to recognize and assess the potential value of innovations has fared in the face of downsized utility organizations, seeking to cut costs through aggressive outsourcing of engineering, procurement and construction activities. Highlighting how re- lations between end-clients and upstream suppliers – following a strategic orientation towards activities con- sidered to be core – increasingly have become mediated by consultants and project-based contractors, the narrative analysis first suggests that this has stolen the industry of important inter-organizational learning processes. This in ways that have reduced the ‘absorptive capacity’ of the utilities sector. Second, the analysis suggests that the contractual form that has come to dominate infrastructure projects further works to de-in- centivize the adoption of new technology, by diluting the perceived utility of innovation across the array of actors populating the value chain. Thirdly, the paper calls for renewed policy measures to deal with this re- inforced reluctance towards the new.

Keywords
Deregulation Industrial fragmentation Innovation adoption/diffusion Absorptive capacity Turnkey construction contracts Innovation utility
National Category
Energy Systems
Research subject
Engineering Science with specialization in industrial engineering and management
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-381144 (URN)10.1016/j.enpol.2018.01.057 (DOI)000430758200023 ()
Available from: 2019-04-04 Created: 2019-04-04 Last updated: 2019-06-25Bibliographically approved
Persson-Fischier, U., Lindahl, M., Gebert Persson, S. & Elbe, J. (2018). DMOs as cargo cults?: A (provocative) perspective on destination management. In: : . Paper presented at Advances in Destination Management 4,University of St Gallen, Switzerland,June 13-15, 2018..
Open this publication in new window or tab >>DMOs as cargo cults?: A (provocative) perspective on destination management
2018 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
National Category
Business Administration Engineering and Technology
Research subject
Engineering Science with specialization in industrial engineering and management
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-353875 (URN)
Conference
Advances in Destination Management 4,University of St Gallen, Switzerland,June 13-15, 2018.
Available from: 2018-06-17 Created: 2018-06-17 Last updated: 2018-11-06Bibliographically approved
Hallgren, M. & Lindahl, M. (2017). Coping with lack of authority: Extending research on project governance with a practice approach. International Journal of Managing Projects in Business/Emerald, 10(2), 244-262
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Coping with lack of authority: Extending research on project governance with a practice approach
2017 (English)In: International Journal of Managing Projects in Business/Emerald, ISSN 1753-8378, E-ISSN 1753-8386, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 244-262Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to identify and explore alternative coping strategies that may compensate for the limitations of weak governance structure in a product development project.

Design/methodology/approach - The findings are based on a single case study, including interviews and documents, of a product development project that consists of two interlinked projects in a large multinational company.

Findings - Two distinct procedures are identified to cope and manage effectively when there are weak project governance structures. The first procedure is a horizontal process of operational consensus-seeking where conflicts between projects are negotiated and resolved through communication between independent actors such as two project managers who are at the same hierarchical level within the same organization. The second process is a vertical process of strategic escalation where issues that have failed to be resolved are shifted upwards to a new hierarchical level where a new round of operational consensus-seeking is attempted.

Research limitations/implications - This paper complements the existing understanding of project governance with a project-as-practice perspective. Based on the findings the authors suggest that project governance needs to be nuanced in its understanding since a too-structured approach may in fact increase tensions in an organization.

Practical implications - Practical insights include how organizations may work with its project governance structures in order to avoid tensions. The authors suggest that, in particular, politically sensitive situations may be avoided by weak rather than strong governance structures.

Social implications - The authors find that weak governance structures may be efficient for the organization, but harmful to personnel, who become too focused on the task at hand.

Originality/value - To the best of the authors' knowledge very little research has been attributed to project governance from a practice approach. Moreover, most attention has been given to strong structures, thereby not examining the positive implications of weak structures.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
EMERALD GROUP PUBLISHING LTD, 2017
Keywords
Governance, Innovation, Product development, Coping strategies, Project-as-practice, Project managers
National Category
Business Administration Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-323507 (URN)10.1108/IJMPB-04-2016-0036 (DOI)000401027500002 ()
Available from: 2017-06-16 Created: 2017-06-16 Last updated: 2017-06-19Bibliographically approved
Gustafsson, C. & Lindahl, M. (2017). Improvisation – An emergence theory perspective. Culture and Organization, 23(3), 177-196
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Improvisation – An emergence theory perspective
2017 (English)In: Culture and Organization, ISSN 1475-9551, E-ISSN 1477-2760, Vol. 23, no 3, p. 177-196Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The paper addresses the occurrence of improvisation and intuition within dynamic business environments from an emergence theory perspective. As argued, the dynamics of the so-called red queen principle forces competition towards the verge of the manageable, making improvised and intuitive action and decision-making not a shortcoming but a necessity in a successful business context. Particularly, the paper discusses how we may interpret the highly rationalistic acts and outcomes of planning and plans in such chaotic and uncertain contexts. We draw upon a longitudinal study of large industrial project deliveries incorporating more than 25 such deliveries.

Keywords
projects, management, improvisation, emergence
National Category
Economics and Business Other Engineering and Technologies not elsewhere specified
Research subject
Engineering Science with specialization in industrial engineering and management
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-267825 (URN)10.1080/14759551.2015.1021801 (DOI)000396839700002 ()
Available from: 2015-11-27 Created: 2015-11-27 Last updated: 2017-12-01Bibliographically approved
Fornstedt, H., Sköld, D. & Lindahl, M. (2017). Stealth Innovation Diffusion: Strategies of hiding the ‘new’ to facilitate innovation diffusion. In: : . Paper presented at European Group for Organizational Studies (EGOS). Copenhagen
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Stealth Innovation Diffusion: Strategies of hiding the ‘new’ to facilitate innovation diffusion
2017 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Copenhagen: , 2017
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Research subject
Engineering Science with specialization in industrial engineering and management
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-381154 (URN)
Conference
European Group for Organizational Studies (EGOS)
Available from: 2019-04-04 Created: 2019-04-04 Last updated: 2019-04-04
Baraldi, E., Lindahl, M. & Severinsson, K. (2016). A proactive approach to the utilization of academic research: The case of Uppsala University's AIMday. Science and Public Policy, 43(5), 613-621
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A proactive approach to the utilization of academic research: The case of Uppsala University's AIMday
2016 (English)In: Science and Public Policy, ISSN 0302-3427, E-ISSN 1471-5430, Vol. 43, no 5, p. 613-621Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

While most research on university-industry interactions focuses on established collaborations, this paper focuses on those interactions that occur before the emergence of a concrete relationship. Uppsala University, Sweden, applies this 'proactive' approach, based on creating universityindustry cooperation platforms before, or irrespectively of, the creation of commercializable knowledge. This study aims to analyze the structure, processes and effects of proactive approaches to utilize academic research commercially. It focuses on a conference, Academy Industry Meeting day (AIMday) and addresses three main questions: first, how does this mechanism work? Second, why do different actors, such as researchers, small and large companies, participate? Third, what values and concrete effects do they obtain from it? Our case study reflects the perspectives of industry, academia and the administrative units organizing the event. We find that some reasons to participate and values are important to all participants, but that there are also considerable differences.

Keywords
academic engagement, commercialization of science, informal mechanisms, university-industry interactions, Uppsala University, proactive
National Category
Economics and Business Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-317063 (URN)10.1093/scipol/scw027 (DOI)000393310700005 ()
Available from: 2017-04-04 Created: 2017-04-04 Last updated: 2017-07-05Bibliographically approved
Baraldi, E., Lindahl, M. & Perna, A. (2016). Start-ups as vessels carrying and developing science-based technologies: starting and restarting JonDeTech. In: Aaboen, Lise; La Rocca, Antonella; Lind, Frida; Perna, Andrea; Shih, Tommy (Ed.), Starting up in Business Networks: Why Relationships Matter in Entrepreneurship. Palgrave Macmillan
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Start-ups as vessels carrying and developing science-based technologies: starting and restarting JonDeTech
2016 (English)In: Starting up in Business Networks: Why Relationships Matter in Entrepreneurship / [ed] Aaboen, Lise; La Rocca, Antonella; Lind, Frida; Perna, Andrea; Shih, Tommy, Palgrave Macmillan, 2016Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Palgrave Macmillan, 2016
National Category
Business Administration Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-294158 (URN)978-1-137-52714-1 (ISBN)
Available from: 2016-05-17 Created: 2016-05-17 Last updated: 2018-07-05
Palm, K. & Lindahl, M. (2015). A project as a workplace Observations from project managers in four R&D and project-intensive companies. International Journal of Project Management, 33(4), 828-838
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A project as a workplace Observations from project managers in four R&D and project-intensive companies
2015 (English)In: International Journal of Project Management, ISSN 0263-7863, E-ISSN 1873-4634, Vol. 33, no 4, p. 828-838Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Projects and project management work present what would seem to be a paradox. Although business and industrial companies regard projects as strategic vehicles for innovation and growth, it is doubtful whether project managers are seen as a similarly strategic asset, due to their working environment. This article, which is based on interviews conducted at four major Scandinavian companies, describes several empirical cases of a project as a workplace. In line with previous research we observe a challenging and in many cases exposed situation for many project managers. Our main finding is that a considerable part of what makes up a non-sustainable project work environment stems from the imbalance of power that exists between permanent and temporary organisational forms. The article concludes that a process of "deprojectification" of project employees, i.e. making the distinction between line and project work less distinct in organisations may actually lead to more sustainable project work.

Keywords
Project managers, Project as workplace, Permanent organisation, Temporary organisation, Sustainable work
National Category
Other Social Sciences Business Administration Engineering and Technology
Research subject
Engineering Science with specialization in industrial engineering and management
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-252982 (URN)10.1016/j.ijproman.2014.10.002 (DOI)000353088400011 ()
Available from: 2015-05-19 Created: 2015-05-18 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
Lindahl, M., Sköld, D. & Fornstedt, H. (2015). STALLING INNOVATION ADOPTION THROUGH THE EMERGENCE OF NEOCONSERVATIVE MARKET STRUCTURES – OBSERVATIONS FROM THE ENERGY SECTOR. In: : . Paper presented at 22ND INNOVATION & PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT MANAGEMENT CONFERENCE.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>STALLING INNOVATION ADOPTION THROUGH THE EMERGENCE OF NEOCONSERVATIVE MARKET STRUCTURES – OBSERVATIONS FROM THE ENERGY SECTOR
2015 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
National Category
Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics Social Sciences Business Administration Engineering and Technology
Research subject
Engineering Science with specialization in industrial engineering and management
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-269099 (URN)
Conference
22ND INNOVATION & PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT MANAGEMENT CONFERENCE
Available from: 2015-12-14 Created: 2015-12-14 Last updated: 2015-12-15
Fornstedt, H., Lindahl, M. & Sköld, D. (2015). Stalling Innovation Adoption through the Emergence of Neoconservative Market Structures: Observations from the Energy Sector. In: : . Paper presented at 22ND Innovation & Product Development Management Conference.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Stalling Innovation Adoption through the Emergence of Neoconservative Market Structures: Observations from the Energy Sector
2015 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Objectives and theoretical and practical relevance: The expectations on industrial actors in the energy transmission sector to lead and facilitate the transition to renewable energy solutions are building up. When significant financial institutions (such as coalitions of pension funds) are taking serious action to drop investments in coal, oil and gas, to instead invest in sustainable technologies, energy transmission is identified as one of the most central areas, insofar as it sets the limits for how renewable energy sources may interact, and it stakes out the direction for what kind of renewable energy technologies are worth investing in. What remains a question, however, is where the innovative spirit needed to facilitate a transition to renewable energy solutions find its power. Components and subsystems for energy transmission are characterized by extremely high demands on reliability and long product life cycles. Consequently, investing in new technology within this realm is seen as a risky endeavor. And energy transmission has therefore been known to be a market marked by a conservative reflex – a reflex that has worked against radical technological developments within this realm.

Historically, this conservative reflex has been dealt with through strategic national development programs, through which daring and demanding customers have been integrated in the value-creating processes, for instance. As Fridlund (1999) has shown, this has driven development as well as diffusion/adoption of new products and technologies within this realm. However, the past decades have seen significant shifts in how energy markets are organized – how utility-customers interact with suppliers, and procure and otherwise relate to new technology. The aim of this paper is to explore structural changes within the energy transmission market that appear to be stalling innovation. More specifically, it looks into how changing business models amongst utilities and reorganized value chains in the procurement, construction, deployment, and maintenance of energy transmission infrastructure seem to have fed the conservative reflex integral to this market, and increased the reluctance to adopt new technology. With the analysis centering on how management ideologies and legal-political frameworks have spurred such changes, the paper highlights a set of conservative forces that are seldom mentioned in the debate around the transition to renewables, and that have been overseen in research on non-adoption of innovation – but which call for a re-consideration of dominating innovation and marketing strategies.

Brief literature mapping and key references: To discuss adoption of energy transmission components and subsystems, the paper draws on research indebted to Rogers’s (1995) work on how diffusion processes are impacted by the ways in which markets are constituted and customers relate to novel offerings (eg, Frambach & Schillewaert 2002, MacVaugh and Schiavone 2010). MacVaugh’s and Schiavone’s (2010) attempt to synthesize existent research on non-adoption of innovation is of particular concern here, with the present analysis dealing with aspects that largely fall outside the ‘integrative model of factors limiting innovation adoption’ they seek to establish, thus extending the understanding of non- adoption encountered there.

Method: The study builds on approximately 20 semi-structured interviews circling around the development, diffusion and adoption of new technology, around customer behavior and organization, and how these different aspects have changed over past decades. Directed towards product/system suppliers, intermediaries, customers/users and allied partners in the energy sector, the conservative theme and its associated dynamics emerged through the interpretative work following the interviews.

Research question and theoretical development: In contrast to MacVaugh and Schiavone’s (2010) integrative model – which outlines, in a rather static way, how factors pertaining to the technology, the social structures and the conditions for learning in the market (may) stand in relation to (non-)adoption on an individual, organizational level and industry/market level – the present study seeks an understanding of a dynamics governed by managerial- ideological and legal-political forces that is restructuring and reconstituting this market: giving rise to new actors, increasing the complexity of intra- and inter-organizational relationships, and fragmenting the interests of the actors involved in the market networks, ultimately making them more reluctant to adopt new technologies.

Findings: With the value chain of this industry spanning across public/private divides, and customers being characterized by increasing degrees of corporatization and privatization, energy markets have been subject to managerial-ideological and legal-political forces that have fragmented and extended the value chains in similar ways, by 1) preventing customers from being an integrative part of development processes, by 2) pushing customers to specialize and seek out business models that increase the dependence on various sub- contractors with limited innovation gain, and by 3) instituting new intermediaries in the procurement process (eg, centralized innovation purchasing units or Engineering Procurement Construction Companies).

Conclusion and contribution to the field: Consequently, the potential benefits of an innovation becomes diluted upon several actors with no joint responsibility. Limiting the innovators’ capacity to convince the market to adopt new technology, and stealing lead customers of progressive purchasing power, this severely inhibits development as well as diffusion of innovation. With respect to theoretical contributions, the study introduces fragmented/ dispersed value chains or value networks into the (non-)adoption discourse, and puts the focus on the dynamics driving such fragmentation and dispersion.

Managerial implications: These findings indicate that suppliers need refined innovation inception strategies that take new purchasing entities with narrow agendas into account, and customers may well have reason to re-assess or formulate specific innovation appropriation strategies. Organizations that have outsourced purchasing, construction and or operating services need to carefully secure systemic innovation need that sub-partners lack knowledge or incitements to attain. 

National Category
Economics and Business Engineering and Technology
Research subject
Business Studies; Engineering Science with specialization in industrial engineering and management
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-268319 (URN)
Conference
22ND Innovation & Product Development Management Conference
Available from: 2015-12-03 Created: 2015-12-03 Last updated: 2015-12-15
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