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Swain, Ashok
Publications (10 of 42) Show all publications
Swain, A. & Öjendal, J. (2018). Environmental Conflict and Peacebuilding: An Introduction. In: Ashok Swain & Joakim Öjendal (Ed.), Routledge Handbook of Environmental Conflict and Peacebuilding: . London: Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Environmental Conflict and Peacebuilding: An Introduction
2018 (English)In: Routledge Handbook of Environmental Conflict and Peacebuilding / [ed] Ashok Swain & Joakim Öjendal, London: Routledge, 2018Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Routledge, 2018
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-372602 (URN)
Available from: 2019-01-07 Created: 2019-01-07 Last updated: 2019-09-13Bibliographically approved
Yasuda, Y., Hill, D., Aich, D., Huntjens, P. & Swain, A. (2018). Multi-track water diplomacy: current and potential future cooperation over the Brahmaputra River Basin. Water international, 43(5), 642-664
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Multi-track water diplomacy: current and potential future cooperation over the Brahmaputra River Basin
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2018 (English)In: Water international, ISSN 0250-8060, E-ISSN 1941-1707, Vol. 43, no 5, p. 642-664Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article analyzes key factors affecting transboundary water cooperation in the Brahmaputra River basin at multiple scales. The analysis of multi-track diplomacy reaffirms the potential of actor-inclusive approaches, arguing for a need to go beyond purely focusing on formal legal norms and consider the possibilities of cultural norms of informal processes of cooperation. Various windows of opportunity' exist in the current phase of the Brahmaputra basin's development, leading to exploration of a Zone of Possible Effective Cooperation, arising from the effort to scale up multi-track initiatives as well as broader geo-political-economic changes happening across and beyond the basin.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ROUTLEDGE JOURNALS, TAYLOR & FRANCIS LTD, 2018
Keywords
Brahmaputra River Basin, multi-track water diplomacy framework, transboundary water cooperation, institutions, regional economic cooperation, Zone of Possible Effective Cooperation
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-365853 (URN)10.1080/02508060.2018.1503446 (DOI)000444262000008 ()
Available from: 2018-11-15 Created: 2018-11-15 Last updated: 2018-11-15Bibliographically approved
Grech-Madin, C., Döring, S., Kim, K. & Swain, A. (2018). Negotiating Water across Levels: A Peace and Conflict “Toolbox” for Water Diplomacy. Journal of Hydrology, 559, 100-109
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Negotiating Water across Levels: A Peace and Conflict “Toolbox” for Water Diplomacy
2018 (English)In: Journal of Hydrology, ISSN 0022-1694, E-ISSN 1879-2707, Vol. 559, p. 100-109Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

As a key policy tool, water diplomacy offers greater political engagement in the cooperative management of shared water. A range of initiatives has been dedicated to this end, almost invariably oriented around the interactions of nation states. Crucially, however, practitioners of water diplomacy also need to address water governance at sub-state levels. As a political, multi-level, and normative field, peace and conflict research offers a pluralism of approaches designed to bring actors together at all levels. Drawing upon this research, this paper offers new focal points for water diplomacy that can enhance its policy effectiveness and enrich its underlying academic current. More specifically, it presents three hitherto undervalued tools for water diplomacy: at the interstate level, to uncover the rich body of political norms that bind states to shared understandings of acceptable practice around water. At the intrastate level, to incorporate ethnography of water users and civil society groups’ responses to state-led waterworks projects, and at the communal level to employ disaggregated georeferenced data on water resources in conflict-prone areas. Taken together, these analytical tools provide a multi-faceted political gauge of the dynamics of water diplomacy, and add vital impetus to develop water diplomacy across multiple levels of policy engagement.

Keywords
Water diplomacy, Peace, Conflict, Policy tools
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Research subject
Peace and Conflict Research
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-342646 (URN)10.1016/j.jhydrol.2018.02.008 (DOI)000430902000009 ()
Available from: 2018-02-22 Created: 2018-02-22 Last updated: 2018-07-03Bibliographically approved
Swain, A. & Öjendal, J. (Eds.). (2018). Routledge Handbook of Environmental Conflict and Peacebuilding. London: Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Routledge Handbook of Environmental Conflict and Peacebuilding
2018 (English)Collection (editor) (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Routledge, 2018. p. 339
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary Political Science (excluding Public Administration Studies and Globalisation Studies)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-372589 (URN)9781138202528 (ISBN)9781315473765 (ISBN)
Available from: 2019-01-07 Created: 2019-01-07 Last updated: 2019-08-21Bibliographically approved
Swain, A. (2018). The Ganges River Water Sharing Agreement between Bangladesh and India: In Search of New Mechanisms to Meet New Challenges. In: Enamul Choudhury, Shafiqul Islam, Lawrence Susskind (Ed.), Complexity of Transboundary Water Conflicts: Enabling Conditions for Negotiating Contingent Resolutions (pp. 129-144). London: Anthem Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Ganges River Water Sharing Agreement between Bangladesh and India: In Search of New Mechanisms to Meet New Challenges
2018 (English)In: Complexity of Transboundary Water Conflicts: Enabling Conditions for Negotiating Contingent Resolutions / [ed] Enamul Choudhury, Shafiqul Islam, Lawrence Susskind, London: Anthem Press, 2018, p. 129-144Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Anthem Press, 2018
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-372600 (URN)9781783088706 (ISBN)
Available from: 2019-01-07 Created: 2019-01-07 Last updated: 2019-09-13Bibliographically approved
Kim, K. & Swain, A. (2017). Crime, Corruption, Terrorism and Beyond: A Typology of Water Crime. In: David Devlaeminck, Zafar Adeel, Robert Sandford (Ed.), The Human Face of Water Security: (pp. 95-111). Springer Publishing Company
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Crime, Corruption, Terrorism and Beyond: A Typology of Water Crime
2017 (English)In: The Human Face of Water Security / [ed] David Devlaeminck, Zafar Adeel, Robert Sandford, Springer Publishing Company, 2017, p. 95-111Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Water security is a multifaceted concept that spreads over political, social, economic and biophysical fields, becoming increasingly important in the age of looming global water crises. Previous research outcomes suggest that escalating global water crises are the results of governance failure not limited to physical shortages of freshwater resources. Water crime is defined in both procedural and moral terms as wrongdoings determined within the legal justice systems and social norms. This chapter explores water crimes in different dimensions with examples from the Global North and South and establishes typologies as follows: mismanagement of water resources causing significant social harms and environmental damage; corruption allowing allocation of water resources for a favoured party, using public office for private economic and political gains and adding payments for more effective service delivery; and, terrorism targeting water infrastructure and systems and affecting water security in water scarce regions. A broader framework to understand the multiple dimensions of water crime is an essential precondition for establishing a comprehensive strategy for achieving water security.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Publishing Company, 2017
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-320245 (URN)978-3-319-50160-4 (ISBN)978-3-319-50161-1 (ISBN)
Available from: 2017-04-18 Created: 2017-04-18 Last updated: 2017-04-19Bibliographically approved
Stoett, P., Daszak, P., Romanelli, C., Machalaba, C., Behringer, R., Chalk, F., . . . Swain, A. (2016). Avoiding catastrophes: seeking synergies among the public health, environmental protection, and human security sectors [Letter to the editor]. The Lancet Global Health, 4(10), e680-e681
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Avoiding catastrophes: seeking synergies among the public health, environmental protection, and human security sectors
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2016 (English)In: The Lancet Global Health, E-ISSN 2214-109X, Vol. 4, no 10, p. e680-e681Article in journal, Letter (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Global health catastrophes have complex origins, often rooted in social disruption, poverty, conflict, and environmental collapse. Avoiding them will require a new integrative analysis of the links between disease, armed conflict, and environmental degradation within a socioecological vulnerability and human security context. Exploring these connections was the aim of Avoiding Catastrophe: Linking Armed Conflict, Harm to Ecosystems, and Public Health, an expert workshop held in May 4–6, 2016, at Concordia University in Montreal, QC, Canada.

Keywords
public health, environmental protection, and human security sectors
National Category
Political Science Globalisation Studies Earth and Related Environmental Sciences Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Peace and Conflict Research; Political Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-302997 (URN)10.1016/S2214-109X(16)30173-5 (DOI)000383848000010 ()27633423 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-09-14 Created: 2016-09-14 Last updated: 2018-05-14Bibliographically approved
Krampe, F. & Swain, A. (2016). Human Development and Minority Empowerment: Exploring Regional Perspectives on Peace in South Asia. In: Oliver Richmond, Sandra Pagodda, Jasmin Ramovic (Ed.), The Palgrave Handbook of Disciplinary and Regional Approaches to Peace: (pp. 363-375). Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Human Development and Minority Empowerment: Exploring Regional Perspectives on Peace in South Asia
2016 (English)In: The Palgrave Handbook of Disciplinary and Regional Approaches to Peace / [ed] Oliver Richmond, Sandra Pagodda, Jasmin Ramovic, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2016, p. 363-375Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

South Asia is the sub-Himalayan southern region of the Asian continent, comprising eight countries: Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Bhutan, Maldives, Nepal, India, Pakistan and Sri Lanka. South Asia has a population of about 1.6 billion, which is characterized by significant cultural divergences between and within the states. An estimated 2,000 ethnic groups, at least six ethnic-linguistic families and several major faiths make South Asia one of the most diverse regions on earth. The states and societies in this vast region face challenges on several fronts. The major challenge is to achieve the social and political stability that is needed to enable their progress towards increased human development. Several factors, however, make the prospects of progress daunting. The rise in the region’s population is a key challenge. A large part of the population in South Asia lives in abject poverty.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2016
National Category
Political Science Human Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-283605 (URN)10.1007/978-1-137-40761-0_28 (DOI)2-s2.0-84978208261 (Scopus ID)978-1-137-40760-3 (ISBN)978-1-137-40761-0 (ISBN)
Available from: 2016-04-13 Created: 2016-04-13 Last updated: 2016-12-15Bibliographically approved
Swain, A. (2016). Water and post-conflict peacebuilding. Hydrological Sciences Journal, 61(7), 1313-1322
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Water and post-conflict peacebuilding
2016 (English)In: Hydrological Sciences Journal, ISSN 0262-6667, E-ISSN 2150-3435, Vol. 61, no 7, p. 1313-1322Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Water-management issues cut across all sectors of governance and have a critical bearing on many post-conflict challenges. The imperative of adequate water supply and the weakness of the state in a post-conflict period provide a nexus which demands comprehensive and well thought-out policy planning, for the short term as well as for the long term. However, very little research has been conducted on the nexus between water management and sustainable development in war-torn societies that are undergoing processes of peacebuilding. This article, after critically reviewing the contribution of water scarcity to security challenges and peacemaking, makes an attempt to contribute to the policy debate on how carefully planned interventions in the water sector can significantly contribute to the post-conflict peacebuilding process, from immediate recovery and rebuilding to long-term sustainable development goals and lasting peace.

Keywords
water scarcity; post-conflict societies; fragile states; peacebuilding
National Category
Social Sciences Oceanography, Hydrology and Water Resources
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-283602 (URN)10.1080/02626667.2015.1081390 (DOI)000378697700014 ()
Available from: 2016-04-13 Created: 2016-04-13 Last updated: 2018-01-10Bibliographically approved
Guinea Barrientos, H. E., Swain, A., Wallin, M. & Nyberg, L. (2015). Disaster Management Cooperation in Central America: The Case of Rainfall-induced Natural Disasters. Geografiska Annaler. Series A, Physical Geography, 97(1), 85-96
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Disaster Management Cooperation in Central America: The Case of Rainfall-induced Natural Disasters
2015 (English)In: Geografiska Annaler. Series A, Physical Geography, ISSN 0435-3676, E-ISSN 1468-0459, Vol. 97, no 1, p. 85-96Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Rainfall-induced natural disasters rank first among all natural disasters in Central America. Due to the geographical conditions of the Central American region, it is common that two or more countries are struck by the same rainfall event, for example Hurricane Mitch in 1998 affected the entire Central American region, killing more than 18 000 people. As a consequence, Central American countries have started to promote regional policies and programs that aim for better preparation and response to these events, including disaster management cooperation. However, cooperation poses several challenges that may hinder its goals. In order to analyse these challenges, we present analysis in this paper of the current policy and legal institutions as well as the main challenges that may hinder international disaster management cooperation in Central America.

Keywords
Central America, Natural Disasters Management, International Cooperation
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-234296 (URN)10.1111/geoa.12095 (DOI)000350500400006 ()
Available from: 2014-10-15 Created: 2014-10-15 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
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