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Svensson, Isak
Publications (10 of 80) Show all publications
Svensson, I. (2019). Biased mediation. In: Jonathan Wilkenfeld, Kyle Beardsley, and David Quinn (Ed.), Research Handbook on Mediating International Crises: . Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Publishing
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Biased mediation
2019 (English)In: Research Handbook on Mediating International Crises / [ed] Jonathan Wilkenfeld, Kyle Beardsley, and David Quinn, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2019Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2019
National Category
Social Sciences
Research subject
Peace and Conflict Research
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-371586 (URN)9781788110693 (ISBN)
Available from: 2018-12-21 Created: 2018-12-21 Last updated: 2019-03-26Bibliographically approved
Duursma, A. & Svensson, I. (2019). Introducing an Agenda-based Measurement of Mediation Success: The Divergent Effects of the Manipulation Strategy in African Civil Wars. International Negotiation, 24(2), 296-323
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Introducing an Agenda-based Measurement of Mediation Success: The Divergent Effects of the Manipulation Strategy in African Civil Wars
2019 (English)In: International Negotiation, ISSN 1382-340X, E-ISSN 1571-8069, Vol. 24, no 2, p. 296-323Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Previous quantitative mediation research has relied on generalized measurements of "mediation success," such as agreements, ceasefires or peace durability. However, these measurements of success do not take into account what mediators were mandated to achieve. We propose benchmarking outcomes against the explicit mandates of the interventions, a novel way of conceptualizing mediation success. Utilizing data on the agendas of mediated negotiations in intrastate armed conflicts in Africa between 1990 and 2010 as a proxy for mediation mandates, we examine the relative effectiveness of manipulation as a mediation strategy. The study shows, in contrast to previous research, that third party manipulation does not have a significant effect on whether the goal of a given round of negotiations is achieved and, that under some circumstances, may decrease the likelihood of mediation success. We discuss the opportunities as well as limitations of a mandate-based approach to the study of mediation success.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Brill Academic Publishers, 2019
Keywords
mediation, mandate, mediation success, mediation strategy, civil war, Africa
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-387562 (URN)10.1163/15718069-24011175 (DOI)000469416000005 ()
Available from: 2019-06-25 Created: 2019-06-25 Last updated: 2019-06-25Bibliographically approved
Finnbogason, D., Larsson, G. & Svensson, I. (2019). Is Shia-Sunni Violence on the Rise?: Exploring New Data on Intra-Muslim Organised Violence 1989-2017. Civil Wars, 21(1), 25-53
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Is Shia-Sunni Violence on the Rise?: Exploring New Data on Intra-Muslim Organised Violence 1989-2017
2019 (English)In: Civil Wars, ISSN 1369-8249, E-ISSN 1743-968X, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 25-53Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This data study provides the first comprehensive empirical overview of organised violence across the Shia and Sunni Muslim divide, 1989-2017. We present a conceptual framework of sectarian dimensions of armed conflicts: sectarian identities; sectarian ideologies; and sectarian alliances. Our analysis demonstrates the extent to which organised violence has been fought across the Shia-Sunni divide. We also explore the sectarian identity dimension in non-state armed conflicts and one-sided violence. Overall, our study shows that most of the organised violence across the Shia-Sunni divide is driven by states, rebel groups, and militias, rather than communities.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ROUTLEDGE JOURNALS, TAYLOR & FRANCIS LTD, 2019
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Research subject
Peace and Conflict Research
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-390292 (URN)10.1080/13698249.2019.1595881 (DOI)000474876700002 ()
Funder
Riksbankens Jubileumsfond, NHS14-1701:1
Available from: 2019-09-05 Created: 2019-09-05 Last updated: 2019-09-05Bibliographically approved
Svensson, I. (2019). Religion in Peace Agreements . In: Marc Weller, Mark Retter, Andrea Varga (Ed.), International law and peace settlements: . Cambridge: Cambridge University Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Religion in Peace Agreements
2019 (English)In: International law and peace settlements / [ed] Marc Weller, Mark Retter, Andrea Varga, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2019Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2019
National Category
Political Science (excluding Public Administration Studies and Globalisation Studies)
Research subject
Peace and Conflict Research
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-371588 (URN)
Available from: 2018-12-21 Created: 2018-12-21 Last updated: 2019-04-02
Svensson, I. & Nilsson, D. (2018). Disputes over the Divine: Introducing the Religion and Armed Conflict (RELAC) data, 1975–2015. Journal of Conflict Resolution, 62(5), 1127-1148
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Disputes over the Divine: Introducing the Religion and Armed Conflict (RELAC) data, 1975–2015
2018 (English)In: Journal of Conflict Resolution, ISSN 0022-0027, E-ISSN 1552-8766, Vol. 62, no 5, p. 1127-1148Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article introduces the Religion and Armed Conflict (RELAC) data, 1975 to 2015, which is a new data set suitable for analyzing the causes, dynamics, and resolution of religious conflicts. It contains information about key religious dimensions of conflicts: whether the issue at stake is religious, the actors’ religious identity, and fine-grained data about the type and salience of religious claims. The article presents the major features of the data set and describes patterns and trends that shed new light on religious conflicts, for example, by demonstrating that conflicts over Islamist claims have become more prevalent. We also illustrate the utility of the data. For instance, we show that there is great variation in lethality across conflicts with different types of Islamist claims, thereby offering a more nuanced understanding of the deadliness of religious conflicts. RELAC should be a valuable resource for scholars, examining religious dimensions of intrastate armed conflicts.

National Category
Political Science (excluding Public Administration Studies and Globalisation Studies)
Research subject
Peace and Conflict Research
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-337584 (URN)10.1177/0022002717737057 (DOI)000429866900009 ()
Funder
Riksbankens Jubileumsfond, NHS 14-1701:1
Available from: 2018-01-02 Created: 2018-01-02 Last updated: 2019-02-04Bibliographically approved
Svensson, I. & Lundgren, M. (2018). From Revolution to Resolution:: Exploring Third‐Party Mediation in Nonviolent Uprisings. Peace and Change, 43(3), 271-291
Open this publication in new window or tab >>From Revolution to Resolution:: Exploring Third‐Party Mediation in Nonviolent Uprisings
2018 (English)In: Peace and Change, ISSN 0149-0508, E-ISSN 1468-0130, Vol. 43, no 3, p. 271-291Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Nonviolent protest movements have been prevalent in the last decades. While such movements aim for peaceful change, they are frequently followed by civil war. Previous research has shown that outcomes of nonviolent protests can be influenced by mediation, but because most previous research on conflict mediation has predominately examined armed conflicts, little is known about when and how mediation occurs. We argue that mediation in nonviolent uprisings is more likely when social conflicts generate negative externalities for the outside world, incentivizing third parties to act and conflict parties to accept their terms. After assessing the scope of the empirical field and identifying anchoring points for future research, we examine data on nonviolent campaigns between 1970 and 2014, investigating patterns in mediation incidence across time and space by situational characteristics, and by the origins of the mediator. We find that protest movements with a higher risk of violent escalation, marked by radicalism or state repression, are more likely to be mediated, and that mediation of nonviolent disputes has shifted from domestic to international mediators. We conclude by discussing theoretical implications for the field as well as suggesting some important policy and practice implications for the mediation of nonviolent conflicts.

Keywords
peace, mediation, nonviolence
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Research subject
Peace and Conflict Research
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-371575 (URN)
Available from: 2018-12-21 Created: 2018-12-21 Last updated: 2019-04-26Bibliographically approved
Svensson, I. (2018). Mediating Closure: Timing. In: William I. Zartman (Ed.), How Negotiations End: Negotiating Behavior in the Endgame. Cambridge University Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mediating Closure: Timing
2018 (English)In: How Negotiations End: Negotiating Behavior in the Endgame / [ed] William I. Zartman, Cambridge University Press, 2018Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cambridge University Press, 2018
National Category
Political Science (excluding Public Administration Studies and Globalisation Studies)
Research subject
Peace and Conflict Research
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-371581 (URN)9781108475839 (ISBN)
Available from: 2018-12-21 Created: 2018-12-21 Last updated: 2019-04-01Bibliographically approved
Svensson, I. (2018). Religion and Civil War: an overview. In: Gunes Tezcur & Paul A. Djupe (Ed.), Oxford Encyclopedia of Politics & Religion: . Oxford University Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Religion and Civil War: an overview
2018 (English)In: Oxford Encyclopedia of Politics & Religion / [ed] Gunes Tezcur & Paul A. Djupe, Oxford University Press, 2018Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2018
National Category
Political Science (excluding Public Administration Studies and Globalisation Studies)
Research subject
Peace and Conflict Research
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-371589 (URN)
Available from: 2018-12-21 Created: 2018-12-21 Last updated: 2019-04-02
Finnbogason, D. & Svensson, I. (2018). The missing jihad: Why have there been no jihadist civil wars in Southeast Asia?. The Pacific Review, 31(1), 96-115
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The missing jihad: Why have there been no jihadist civil wars in Southeast Asia?
2018 (English)In: The Pacific Review, ISSN 0951-2748, E-ISSN 1470-1332, Vol. 31, no 1, p. 96-115Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Why has there been no jihadist civil war in Southeast Asia? Although there has been a global surge in armed conflicts where at least one side fights for self-proclaimed Islamist aspirations, the region of Southeast Asia stands out by not having experienced a single jihadist civil war after 1975. Yet, so far, there have been no systematic comparisons of the frequency and nature of the Islamist violence in Southeast Asia and the rest of the world. This study therefore contributes by exploring the empirical trajectories in the region and situating Southeast Asia to global developments, utilizing new and unique data on religiously defined armed conflicts 1975-2015. We find that whereas the number of people killed in Islamist violence has increased in the rest of the world, it has decreased in Southeast Asia. We argue that Southeast Asia has prevented outbreaks of jihadist civil wars, and contained and partially resolved ongoing Islamist conflicts before they have escalated, due to three interrelated factors: the lack of internationalization of Islamist conflicts in the region, the openness of political channels for voicing Islamist aspirations, and government repression. This article suggests insights from the region that can be valuable from a global perspective.

National Category
Political Science (excluding Public Administration Studies and Globalisation Studies)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-333315 (URN)10.1080/09512748.2017.1325391 (DOI)000428133600006 ()
Funder
Riksbankens Jubileumsfond, NHS14-1701:1, M10-0100:1
Available from: 2017-11-10 Created: 2017-11-10 Last updated: 2018-07-18Bibliographically approved
Aggestam, K. & Svensson, I. (2018). Where Are the Women in Peace Mediation?. In: Karin Aggestam & Ann E. Towns (Ed.), Gendering Diplomacy and International Negotiation: (pp. 149-168). Palgrave Macmillan
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Where Are the Women in Peace Mediation?
2018 (English)In: Gendering Diplomacy and International Negotiation / [ed] Karin Aggestam & Ann E. Towns, Palgrave Macmillan, 2018, p. 149-168Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Palgrave Macmillan, 2018
Series
Studies in Diplomacy and International Relations
National Category
Political Science (excluding Public Administration Studies and Globalisation Studies)
Research subject
Peace and Conflict Research
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-371578 (URN)10.1007/978-3-319-58682-3_8 (DOI)978-3-319-58681-6 (ISBN)
Available from: 2018-12-21 Created: 2018-12-21 Last updated: 2019-04-03Bibliographically approved
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