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Publications (7 of 7) Show all publications
Nyström, E. (2014). Codicological Crossover: The Merging of Manuscript and Print. Studia Neophilologica, 86(1), 112-133
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Codicological Crossover: The Merging of Manuscript and Print
2014 (English)In: Studia Neophilologica, ISSN 0039-3274, E-ISSN 1651-2308, Vol. 86, no 1, p. 112-133Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Books containing both manuscript and print items were once common entities, just as it was customary to combine several printed texts into a collective binding, a Sammelband. This article discusses various ways that the two media, the handwritten and the printed, coincided and complemented each other in books from the hand-press era. That handwriting continued to be used for book production even after the introduction of printing is well documented, but the hybrid books with both media present still await their due attention from researchers, a need this article attempts to address. After a brief survey of how the media merged, two examples are described in more detail: they concern books which once belonged to the Jesuit College in Braniewo, Poland, but were taken as war booty and ended up in Uppsala University Library in the early seventeenth century.

National Category
Languages and Literature
Research subject
Literature
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-222480 (URN)10.1080/00393274.2013.856534 (DOI)000335850200008 ()
Available from: 2014-04-11 Created: 2014-04-11 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Nyström, E. & Granholm, P. (2013). Grekiska handskrifter i Sverige. Hellenika, 143, 8-9
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Grekiska handskrifter i Sverige
2013 (Swedish)In: Hellenika, ISSN 0384-0100, Vol. 143, p. 8-9Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.)) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: Föreningen Svenska Atheninstitutets Vänner, 2013
National Category
Languages and Literature
Research subject
Greek
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-221301 (URN)
Projects
Greek Manuscripts in Sweden
Funder
Riksbankens Jubileumsfond
Available from: 2014-03-27 Created: 2014-03-27 Last updated: 2014-04-07
Nyström, E. (2013). Looking for the Purpose behind a Multitext Book: The Miscellany as a Personal "One-Volume Library". In: Lucie Doležalová och Kimberly Rivers (Ed.), Medieval Manuscript Miscellanies: Composition, Authorship, Use (pp. 70-81). Krems: Medium Aevum Quotidianum, Sonderband 31
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Looking for the Purpose behind a Multitext Book: The Miscellany as a Personal "One-Volume Library"
2013 (English)In: Medieval Manuscript Miscellanies: Composition, Authorship, Use / [ed] Lucie Doležalová och Kimberly Rivers, Krems: Medium Aevum Quotidianum , 2013, Vol. Sonderband 31, p. 70-81Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Krems: Medium Aevum Quotidianum, 2013
Series
Medium aevum quotidianum ; Sonderband 31
National Category
Languages and Literature
Research subject
Greek
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-221303 (URN)978-3-901094-33-4 (ISBN)
Available from: 2014-03-27 Created: 2014-03-27 Last updated: 2014-04-07
Nyström, E. (2011). Permeable Boundaries: Manuscript and Print in Concert in Early Modern Sweden. LIR.journal, 1, 101-125
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Permeable Boundaries: Manuscript and Print in Concert in Early Modern Sweden
2011 (English)In: LIR.journal, ISSN 2001-2489, Vol. 1, p. 101-125Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article intends to show how manuscript and printed texts continued to co-exist during the first centuries following the invention of the printing press. The two media depended on and nourished each other in various ways. The handwritten text usually precedes the print, but often the print also becomes a model for handwritten copies. Furthermore, there are texts – and books – which were never intended to be printed due to their personal character, or which could not be printed due to their particular or provocative contents. Variations within this concomitance of printed and handwritten material are discussed on the basis of a number of manuscript books from Skara Stifts- och Landsbibliotek. The examples include authors’ originals, miscellanies, study compendia, interfoliated and annotated prints, and books that display manuscript and printed text items bound together. The creation of apographs by Swedish war prisoners during their Siberian captivity is referred to as a case where sheer necessity brought about manuscript book production in the early eighteenth century.

Keywords
manuscript, autograph, apograph, miscellany, interfoliation, annotated print, Skara Stifts- och Landsbibliotek
National Category
Languages and Literature
Research subject
Literature
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-190982 (URN)
Available from: 2013-01-09 Created: 2013-01-09 Last updated: 2014-04-10
Nyström, E. (2009). Containing Multitudes: Codex Upsaliensis Graecus 8 in Perspective. (Doctoral dissertation). Uppsala: Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Containing Multitudes: Codex Upsaliensis Graecus 8 in Perspective
2009 (English)Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

This study employs as its primary source a codex from Uppsala University Library, Codex Upsaliensis Graecus 8. Its aim is to contribute to a better understanding of the Late Byzantine and post-Byzantine miscellaneous book. It is argued that multitext books reflect the time and society in which they were created. A thorough investigation of such books sheds light on the interests and concerns of the scribes, owners, and readers of the books. Containing some ninety texts of different character and from different genres, Codex Upsaliensis Graecus 8 is a complex creation, but still an example of a type of book that was common during the Middle Ages and the Renaissance. This study takes a comprehensive view of the book in its entirety, making sense of its different parts in relation to the whole with the help of codicology and textual analysis. With that approach the original idea of the book is brought to the fore, and the texts are studied in the same context that the main scribe Theodoros chose and the early owners and readers of the book encountered.

Through a systematic codicological analysis, the overall structure of the codex is explored and suggestions are made concerning the provenance. The examination of the scribal work procedure becomes a means to profile this otherwise fairly unknown scribe. The texts are grouped and characterized typologically to illustrate connections throughout the whole book as well as in relation to the separate structural units. The role of micro-texts and secondary layers of inscription is also considered. From the perspective of usability the texts are divided into four categories: narrative texts, rhetorical texts, philosophical-theological texts, and practical texts. Three texts are studied in greater depth, as examples of the width of the scribe's interests and the variety of the book's contents.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Uppsala: Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis, 2009. p. 340
Series
Studia Byzantina Upsaliensia, ISSN 0283-1244 ; 11
National Category
Specific Languages
Research subject
Greek
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-100643 (URN)978-91-554-7501-7 (ISBN)
Public defence
2009-05-16, Ihresalen, Engelska parken, Humanistiskt centrum, Thunbergsvägen 3, Uppsala, 10:15 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2009-05-15 Created: 2009-04-04 Last updated: 2018-05-14Bibliographically approved
Nilsson, I. & Nyström, E. (2009). To Compose, Read, and Use a Byzantine Text: Aspects of the Chronicle of Constantine Manasses. Byzantine and modern Greek studies, 33(1), 42-60
Open this publication in new window or tab >>To Compose, Read, and Use a Byzantine Text: Aspects of the Chronicle of Constantine Manasses
2009 (English)In: Byzantine and modern Greek studies, ISSN 0307-0131, E-ISSN 1749-625X, Vol. 33, no 1, p. 42-60Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Constantine Manasses' Synopsis Chronike is a twelfth-century verse chronicle, recasting Byzantine history in a specifically Comnenian, romantic and poetic vein. The chronicle has been preserved in many manuscripts, but it has also come down to us in a number of different collections of excerpts. This article wishes to draw attention to the readers/excerptors of the Synopsis Chronike, to consider the use and usefulness of the text in relation to the composition itself. Some collections of excerpts are compared and discussed, with special focus on the excerpts included in a fifteenth-century miscellaneous manuscript (Codex Upsaliensis Graecus 8).

Keywords
Byzantine manuscripts, Byzantine historiography, Ups.gr.8, codicology, narratology
National Category
Classical Archaeology and Ancient History
Research subject
Byzantine Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-99874 (URN)10.1179/174962509X384606 (DOI)000264124300003 ()
Available from: 2009-03-22 Created: 2009-03-22 Last updated: 2017-12-13
Nyström, E. B. (2003). Kring en 1400-talshandskrift i Uppsala universitetsbibliotek. Bysantinska sällskapet. Bulletin, 21, 39-45
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Kring en 1400-talshandskrift i Uppsala universitetsbibliotek
2003 (Swedish)In: Bysantinska sällskapet. Bulletin, ISSN 1102-674X, Vol. 21, p. 39-45Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.)) Published
National Category
Classical Archaeology and Ancient History
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-26522 (URN)
Available from: 2007-02-19 Created: 2007-02-19 Last updated: 2014-04-07
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-5684-913X

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