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Sundström Poromaa, IngerORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-2491-2042
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Publications (10 of 170) Show all publications
Piltonen, T. T., Giacobini, P., Edvinsson, Å., Hustad, S., Lager, S., Morin-Papunen, L., . . . Arffman, R. K. (2019). Circulating antimüllerian hormone and steroid hormone levels remain high in pregnant women with polycystic ovary syndrome at term. Fertility and Sterility, 111(3), 588-596.e1
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Circulating antimüllerian hormone and steroid hormone levels remain high in pregnant women with polycystic ovary syndrome at term
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2019 (English)In: Fertility and Sterility, ISSN 0015-0282, E-ISSN 1556-5653, Vol. 111, no 3, p. 588-596.e1Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: To investigate plasma antimullerian hormone (AMH) concentration and its relation to steroid hormone levels in pregnant women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and controls at term.

Design: Case-control study.

Setting: University-affiliated hospital.

Patient(s): A total of 74 pregnant women at term: 25 women with PCOS (aged 31.6 ± 3.9 years [mean ± standard deviation], body mass index 24.0 ± 3.9 kg/m2, mean gestational length 279 ± 9 days) and 49 controls (aged 31.7 ± 3.3 years, body mass index 24.0 ± 3.3 kg/m2, mean gestational length 281 ± 9 days).

Intervention(s): None.

Main Outcome Measure(s): Plasma AMH and steroid hormone levels.

Result(s): Antimullerian hormone, T, and androstenedione levels were higher in women with PCOS at term compared with controls, whereas estrogen and P levels were similar. The differences were pronounced in women carrying a female fetus. Testosterone and AMH levels correlated positively in both groups, but E2 levels only in women with PCOS.

Conclusion(s): Pregnant women with PCOS present with elevated AMH and androgen levels even at term, suggesting a hormonal imbalance during PCOS pregnancy. Differences were detected especially in pregnancies with a female fetus, raising the question of whether female pregnancies are more susceptible to AMH and steroid hormone actions.

Keywords
Antimullerian hormone, androgens, polycystic ovary syndrome, pregnancy
National Category
Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-379340 (URN)10.1016/j.fertnstert.2018.11.028 (DOI)000460037400031 ()30630591 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-03-15 Created: 2019-03-15 Last updated: 2019-03-15Bibliographically approved
Comasco, E., Schijven, D., de Maeyer, H., Vrettou, M., Nylander, I., Sundström-Poromaa, I. & Olivier, J. D. A. (2019). Constitutive serotonin transporter reduction resembles maternal separation with regard to stress-related gene expression. ACS Chemical Neuroscience, 10(7), 3132-3142
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Constitutive serotonin transporter reduction resembles maternal separation with regard to stress-related gene expression
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2019 (English)In: ACS Chemical Neuroscience, ISSN 1948-7193, E-ISSN 1948-7193, Vol. 10, no 7, p. 3132-3142Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Interactive effects between allelic variants of the serotonin transporter (5-HTT) promoter-linked polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR) and stressors on depression symptoms have been documented, as well as questioned, by meta-analyses. Translational models of constitutive 5-htt reduction and experimentally controlled stressors often led to inconsistent behavioral and molecular findings and often did not include females. The present study sought to investigate the effect of 5-htt genotype, maternal separation, and sex on the expression of stress-related candidate genes in the rat hippocampus and frontal cortex. The mRNA expression levels of Avp, Pomc, Crh, Crhbp, Crhr1, Bdnf, Ntrk2, Maoa, Maob, and Comt were assessed in the hippocampus and frontal cortex of 5-htt± and 5-htt+/+ male and female adult rats exposed, or not, to daily maternal separation for 180 min during the first 2 postnatal weeks. Gene- and brain region-dependent, but sex-independent, interactions between 5-htt genotype and maternal separation were found. Gene expression levels were higher in 5-htt+/+ rats not exposed to maternal separation compared with the other experimental groups. Maternal separation and 5-htt+/− genotype did not yield additive effects on gene expression. Correlative relationships, mainly positive, were observed within, but not across, brain regions in all groups except in non-maternally separated 5-htt+/+ rats. Gene expression patterns in the hippocampus and frontal cortex of rats exposed to maternal separation resembled the ones observed in rats with reduced 5-htt expression regardless of sex. These results suggest that floor effects of 5-htt reduction and maternal separation might explain inconsistent findings in humans and rodents.

Keywords
Frontal cortex, hippocampus, maternal separation, serotonin transporter, gene expression
National Category
Neurosciences Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-381818 (URN)10.1021/acschemneuro.8b00595 (DOI)000476685400012 ()30614673 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Society of Medicine, SLS-411161Fredrik och Ingrid Thurings StiftelseLars Hierta Memorial FoundationSwedish Research Council, K2012-61X-22090-01-3Swedish Research Council, VR: 2015-00495EU, FP7, Seventh Framework Programme, INCA 600398Science for Life Laboratory - a national resource center for high-throughput molecular bioscience
Available from: 2019-04-15 Created: 2019-04-15 Last updated: 2019-09-20Bibliographically approved
Breedh, J., Comasco, E., Hellgren, C., Papadopoulos, F. C., Skalkidou, A. & Sundström Poromaa, I. (2019). Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis responsiveness, startle response, and sensorimotor gating in late pregnancy. Psychoneuroendocrinology, 106, 1-8
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis responsiveness, startle response, and sensorimotor gating in late pregnancy
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2019 (English)In: Psychoneuroendocrinology, ISSN 0306-4530, E-ISSN 1873-3360, Vol. 106, p. 1-8Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

During pregnancy, the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, the main regulator of the stress response, undergoes dramatic changes. The acoustic startle response (ASR) and the prepulse inhibition (PPI) of the startle response are neurophysiological research tools and objective measures of an individual's response to an emotional context or stressor. The ASR and PPI are influenced by psychiatric diseases characterized by anxiety symptoms and are sensitive to cortisol. Hence, the ASR and the PPI can be used to investigate the effects of pregnancy-induced endocrine changes and their contribution to affective disorders. The present study sought to investigate the association between measures of HPA-axis responsiveness, startle reactivity and sensorimotor gating during pregnancy that to date remains unknown. The eye-blink component of the ASR, and its prepulse inhibition, were measured in 107 late third trimester pregnant women. Saliva samples were collected to assess the cortisol awakening response (CAR), a measure of HPA-axis activity. Blood was sampled to measure serum levels of cortisol, cortisone and the cortisone to cortisol ratio. Ongoing anxiety disorders, sleep duration, smoking, and age were considered as potential confounders in the statistical analyses. CAR reactivity, measured as area under the curve (AUC) increase and above baseline, was positively associated with baseline startle magnitude [Cohen's d = 0.27; F (1, 105) = 4.99; p = 0.028, and Cohen's d = 0.30; F (1, 105) = 6.25; p = 0.014, respectively] as well as PPI at 86 dB [Cohen's d = 0.29; F (1, 105) = 5.93; p = 0.017; and Cohen's d = 0.34; F (1, 105) = 8.38; p = 0.005, respectively]. The observed positive correlation between startle magnitude in pregnant women and greater increase in cortisol during the awakening response may be interpreted as heightened neurophysiological reactivity, likely associated with dysregulation of the stress system.

Keywords
AUC, CAR, Cortisol, Pregnancy, Sensorimotor gating, Startle response
National Category
Endocrinology and Diabetes Neurosciences Psychiatry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-381815 (URN)10.1016/j.psyneuen.2019.03.008 (DOI)000474678300001 ()30927623 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 521-2013-2339Marianne and Marcus Wallenberg Foundation, MMW2011.0115The Swedish Medical Association, SLS-250581Swedish Society of Medicine, SLS-331991Swedish Research Council, 2015-00495EU, FP7, Seventh Framework Programme, INCA 600398
Available from: 2019-04-15 Created: 2019-04-15 Last updated: 2019-08-16Bibliographically approved
Bränn, E., Edvinsson, Å., Rostedt Punga, A., Sundström Poromaa, I. & Skalkidou, A. (2019). Inflammatory and anti-inflammatory markers in plasma: from late pregnancy to early postpartum. Scientific Reports, 9, Article ID 1863.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Inflammatory and anti-inflammatory markers in plasma: from late pregnancy to early postpartum
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2019 (English)In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 9, article id 1863Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

During pregnancy, the woman's body undergoes tremendous changes in immune system adaptation. The immunological shifts that occur in pregnancy can partially be explained by alterations in hormonal levels. Furthermore, during pregnancy, many autoimmune diseases go into remission, only to flare again in the early postpartum period. Given these important changes in the clinical course of a number of autoimmune disorders, surprisingly little has been done to investigate the inflammatory profile changes across pregnancy and the postpartum period. Thus, the aim of this study was to describe how inflammatory and anti-inflammatory markers change from late pregnancy to the early postpartum period, using a multiplexed assay consisting of both well-known as well as exploratory proteins. Two-hundred-and-ninety women were included in this study and donated a total of 312 blood samples; 198 in late pregnancy (similar to gw38) and 114 in the postpartum period (similar to w8). The plasma blood samples were analyzed for 92 immune system related protein markers using Proseek Multiplex Inflammation I panel, a high-sensitivity assay based on proximity extension assay technology. Fifty-six inflammatory and anti-inflammatory markers were significantly different between pregnancy and the postpartum, of which 50 survived corrections for multiple comparisons. Out of these 50 markers, 41 decreased from pregnancy to postpartum, while the remaining 9 increased in the postpartum period. The top five markers with the greatest decrease in the postpartum period were Leukemia inhibitory factor receptor (LIF-R), Latency-associated peptide Transforming growth factor beta-1 (LAP TGF-beta-1), C-C motif chemokine 28 (CCL28), Oncostatin M (OSM) and Fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21). Top three markers that increased in the postpartum period were Tumor necrosis factor ligand superfamily member 11 (TRANCE), Tumor necrosis factor ligand superfamily member 12 (TWEAK), and C-C motif chemokine/Eotaxin (CCL11). This study revealed that the majority of the markers decreased from pregnancy to postpartum, and only a few increased. Several of the top proteins that were higher in pregnancy than postpartum have anti-inflammatory and immune modulatory properties promoting pregnancy progress. These results clearly reflect the tremendous change in the immune system in the pregnancy to postpartum transition.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
NATURE PUBLISHING GROUP, 2019
National Category
Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-378379 (URN)10.1038/s41598-018-38304-w (DOI)000458401500066 ()30755659 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, VR:521-2013-2339Swedish Research Council, 523-2014-2342Marianne and Marcus Wallenberg Foundation
Available from: 2019-03-05 Created: 2019-03-05 Last updated: 2019-03-05Bibliographically approved
Maack, H. P., Skalkidou, A., Sjöholm, A., Eurenius-Orre, K., Mulic-Lutvica, A., Wikström, A.-K. & Sundström Poromaa, I. (2019). Maternal body mass index moderates antenatal depression effects on infant birthweight. Scientific Reports, 9, Article ID 6213.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Maternal body mass index moderates antenatal depression effects on infant birthweight
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2019 (English)In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 9, article id 6213Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Obesity and depression are two common medical problems that pregnant women present with in antenatal care. Overweight and obesity at the beginning of the pregnancy, and excessive weight gain during pregnancy, are independent explanatory variables for fetal birthweight and independent risk factors for giving birth to a large for gestational age (LGA) infant. However, the effect of co-morbid depression has received little attention. This study set out to investigate if maternal body mass index (BMI) in early pregnancy moderates antenatal depression effects on infant birthweight. 3965 pregnant women participated in this longitudinal cohort study, where cases (n = 178) had Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) score >= 17 in gestational week 17 or 32, and remaining women (n = 3787) were used as controls. The influence of maternal BMI and antenatal depressive symptoms on standardized birthweight was evaluated by analysis of covariance, with adjustment for relevant confounders. Depressed women with BMI 25.0 kg/m(2) or more gave birth to infants with significantly greater standardized birthweight than non-depressed overweight women, whereas the opposite pattern was noted in normal weight women (BMI by antenatal depressive symptoms interaction; F(1,3839) = 6.32; p = 0.012. The increased birthweight in women with co-prevalent overweight and depressive symptoms was not explained by increased weight gain during the pregnancy. Maternal BMI at the beginning of pregnancy seems to influence the association between antenatal depressive symptoms and infant birthweight, but in opposite directions depending on whether the pregnant women is normal weight or overweight. Further studies are needed to confirm our finding.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
NATURE PUBLISHING GROUP, 2019
National Category
Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-383196 (URN)10.1038/s41598-019-42360-1 (DOI)000464988500025 ()30996270 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-07-23 Created: 2019-07-23 Last updated: 2019-07-23Bibliographically approved
Sundström Poromaa, I., Comasco, E., Bäckström, T., Bixo, M., Jensen, P. & Frokjaer, V. G. (2019). Negative Association Between Allopregnanolone and Cerebral Serotonin Transporter Binding in Healthy Women of Fertile Age. Frontiers in Psychology, 9, Article ID 2767.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Negative Association Between Allopregnanolone and Cerebral Serotonin Transporter Binding in Healthy Women of Fertile Age
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2019 (English)In: Frontiers in Psychology, ISSN 1664-1078, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 9, article id 2767Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Allopregnanolone is a metabolite of the sex hormone progesterone, with suggested relevance for female mood disorders. While allopregnanolone and serotonin are known to influence psychological well-being, the molecular and psychological specifics of their relationship are to date poorly understood, especially in women of fertile age who experience regular fluctuations of progesterone across the menstrual cycle. Availability of serotonin in the synaptic cleft is regulated by the serotonin transporter (SERT), which can be imaged in the living human brain by use of positron emission tomography (PET) and the radiotracer [C-11]DASB. To evaluate sex-specific allopregnanolone-SERT interactions, the present study investigated the relationship between cerebral SERT availability, serum allopregnanolone levels and psychological well-being in women of fertile age. Brain imaging data, self-reported symptoms of mental distress and emotion regulation, and biobank material from ninety healthy women were available from the Center for Integrated Molecular Brain Imaging (CIMBI) database. Age, BMI, and daylight minutes were included as covariates in the analyses and SERT genotype (5-HTTLPR) was considered a potential confounder. Lower serum allopregnanolone levels were associated with higher SERT binding in the prefrontal cortex. Moreover, allopregnanolone levels were negatively associated with measures of alertness, although this finding was not mediated by prefrontal cortex SERT binding. These findings suggest a link between the typical psychological well-being experienced in the follicular phase when allopregnanolone levels are low and higher SERT in the prefrontal cortex, a region for higher cognitive functions and top-down regulation of emotions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
FRONTIERS MEDIA SA, 2019
Keywords
allopregnanolone, brain, mood, PET, serotonin transporter, women, 5HTT
National Category
Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-375873 (URN)10.3389/fpsyg.2018.02767 (DOI)000455554400001 ()30687199 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research CouncilEU, FP7, Seventh Framework Programme, INCA 600398Science for Life Laboratory - a national resource center for high-throughput molecular bioscience
Available from: 2019-02-04 Created: 2019-02-04 Last updated: 2019-02-04Bibliographically approved
Hesselman, S., Wikström, A.-K., Skalkidou, A., Sundström Poromaa, I. & Wikman, A. (2019). Neighborhood deprivation and adverse perinatal outcomes in Sweden: A population-based register study. Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, 98(8), 1004-1013
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Neighborhood deprivation and adverse perinatal outcomes in Sweden: A population-based register study
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2019 (English)In: Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6349, E-ISSN 1600-0412, Vol. 98, no 8, p. 1004-1013Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction: Neighborhood deprivation has been associated with adverse perinatal outcomes but it is unclear to what extent maternal and social risk factors explain the association and how a stressful environment per se contributes.

Material and methods: A population-based register study including 218 030 deliveries in Sweden between January 2013 and July 2017 was conducted. Exposure was living in a deprived or severely deprived area defined by the National Operations Department of the Swedish Police Authority. Adverse perinatal outcomes included preterm births, small-for-gestational-age births and stillbirths. A propensity score-based method was used to control for individual baseline characteristics. Associations were investigated with logistic regression analyses and risk estimates are presented as crude (OR) and adjusted odds ratio (aOR) with 95% confidence interval (CI).

Results: Living in a deprived neighborhood in Sweden was associated with extremely preterm births (deprived area OR 1.50, 95% CI 1.07-2.11, severely deprived OR 1.90, 95% CI 1.40-2.58), small-for-gestational-age birth (deprived OR 1.45, 95% CI 1.31-1.60, severely deprived OR 1.85, 95% CI 1.69-2.03) and stillbirth (deprived OR 1.62, 95% CI 1.17-2.26, severely deprived OR 1.56, 95% CI 1.11-2.19). After accounting for individual maternal and social risk factors, the risk of small for gestational age in severely deprived areas remained (aOR 1.45, 95% CI, 1.19-1.75).

Conclusions: The contextual effect of living in a deprived neighborhood on the risk of extremely preterm births, small-for-gestational-age births and stillbirths was to a high extent explained by individual factors of women residing in exposed areas, yet remained for small-for-gestational-age births in severely deprived areas after adjustment for maternal and social risk factors.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
WILEY, 2019
Keywords
neighborhood deprivation, premature birth, residence characteristics, small for gestational age, stillbirth
National Category
Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-391289 (URN)10.1111/aogs.13582 (DOI)000476678100008 ()30779118 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2014-3561Swedish Research Council, 523-2014-07605
Available from: 2019-08-22 Created: 2019-08-22 Last updated: 2019-08-22Bibliographically approved
Axfors, C., Hellgren, C., Volgsten, H., Skoog Svanberg, A., Ekselius, L., Wikström, A.-K., . . . Sundström-Poromaa, I. (2019). Neuroticism is associated with higher antenatal care utilization in obstetric low-risk women. Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, 98(4), 470-478
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Neuroticism is associated with higher antenatal care utilization in obstetric low-risk women
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2019 (English)In: Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6349, E-ISSN 1600-0412, Vol. 98, no 4, p. 470-478Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction

Elevated neuroticism is associated with higher health care utilization in the general population. This study aimed to investigate the association between neuroticism and the use of publicly financed antenatal care in obstetric low‐risk women, taking predisposing and need factors for health care utilization into consideration.

Material and methods

Participants comprised 1052 obstetric low‐risk women (no chronic diseases or adverse pregnancy conditions) included in several obstetrics/gynecology studies in Uppsala, Sweden. Neuroticism was self‐rated on the Swedish universities Scales of Personality. Medical records of their first subsequent pregnancy were scanned for antenatal care use. Associations between antenatal care use and neuroticism were analyzed with logistic regression (binary outcomes) or negative binomial regression (count outcomes) comparing the 75th and 25th neuroticism percentiles. Depending on the Akaike information criterion the exposure was modeled as either linear or with restricted cubic splines. Analyses were adjusted for predisposing (sociodemographic and parity) and need factors (body mass index and psychiatric morbidity).

Results

After adjustment, women with higher neuroticism had more fetal ultrasounds (incidence rate ratio = 1.09, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.02‐1.16), more emergency visits to an obstetrician/gynecologist (incidence rate ratio = 1.22, 95% CI 1.03‐1.45) and were more likely to visit a fear‐of‐childbirth clinic (odds ratio = 2.71, 95% CI 1.71‐4.29). Moreover, they more often consulted midwives in specialized antenatal care facilities (significant J‐shaped association).

Conclusions

Neuroticism was associated with higher utilization of publicly financed antenatal care in obstetric low‐risk women, even after adjusting for predisposing and need factors. Future studies should address the benefits of interventions as a complement to routine antenatal care programs to reduce subclinical anxiety.

Keywords
antenatal care, health care utilization, neuroticism, personality, pregnancy, prenatal care
National Category
Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Medicine
Research subject
Obstetrics and Gynaecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-364260 (URN)10.1111/aogs.13506 (DOI)000460954800008 ()30457176 (PubMedID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2007-1955Marianne and Marcus Wallenberg Foundation, MMW2011.0115The Swedish Medical Association, SLS-250581Swedish Research Council, 521-2010-3293Swedish Research Council, K2008-54X-20642-01-3Swedish Society of MedicineStiftelsen Söderström - Königska sjukhemmetTore Nilsons Stiftelse för medicinsk forskning
Available from: 2018-10-24 Created: 2018-10-24 Last updated: 2019-04-15Bibliographically approved
Valdimarsdottir, R., Valgeirsdóttir, H., Wikström, A.-K., Kallak, T. K., Elenis, E., Axelsson, O., . . . Sundström Poromaa, I. (2019). Pregnancy and neonatal complications in women with polycystic ovary syndrome in relation to second-trimester anti-Müllerian hormone levels. Reproductive Biomedicine Online, 39(1), 141-148
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Pregnancy and neonatal complications in women with polycystic ovary syndrome in relation to second-trimester anti-Müllerian hormone levels
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2019 (English)In: Reproductive Biomedicine Online, ISSN 1472-6483, E-ISSN 1472-6491, Vol. 39, no 1, p. 141-148Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

RESEARCH QUESTION: An association has been found between high anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) levels during pregnancy and the development of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS)-like phenotypic traits in mouse offspring. The aim of this study was to determine whether AMH levels are associated with maternal testosterone levels, and whether high AMH concentration influences the risk of developing PCOS-related adverse pregnancy outcomes.

DESIGN: Maternal serum AMH, testosterone and sex hormone binding globulin levels were measured in blood samples taken in early second-trimester pregnancies from women with PCOS (n = 159) and healthy controls matched for body mass index (n = 320). Possible associations with preeclampsia, gestational hypertension, gestational diabetes, preterm birth and birthweight was explored by logistic and linear regression models.

RESULTS: Women with PCOS had higher AMH, higher total testosterone levels and higher free androgen index than controls (P < 0.001 for all three parameters). Among women with PCOS, high testosterone levels (B = 2.7; β = 0.26; P = 0.001) and low first trimester body mass index (B = -0.5; β = -0.17; P = 0.043) remained independently associated with AMH. High AMH levels were associated with decreased risk of gestational hypertension (adjusted OR 0.55; 95% CI 0.34 to 0.87), but no association was found with other adverse pregnancy outcomes or birthweight.

CONCLUSIONS: Women with PCOS had higher AMH levels during pregnancy compared with controls, but high AMH was not associated with increased risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes or birthweight.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Birthweight, Polycystic ovary syndrome, anti-Müllerian hormone, Pregnancy complications, Testosterone
National Category
Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-388700 (URN)10.1016/j.rbmo.2019.02.004 (DOI)000472220300015 ()31036431 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-07-03 Created: 2019-07-03 Last updated: 2019-08-07Bibliographically approved
Valgeirsdóttir, H., Vanky, E., Sundström Poromaa, I., Roos, N., Lovvik, T. S., Stephansson, O. & Wikström, A.-K. (2019). Prenatal exposures and birth indices, and subsequent risk of polycystic ovary syndrome: a national registry-based cohort study. British Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, 126(2), 244-251
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Prenatal exposures and birth indices, and subsequent risk of polycystic ovary syndrome: a national registry-based cohort study
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2019 (English)In: British Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, ISSN 1470-0328, E-ISSN 1471-0528, Vol. 126, no 2, p. 244-251Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: To study the associations between prenatal exposures and risk of developing polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS).

Design: National registry-based cohort study.

Setting: Sweden.

Population: Girls born in Sweden during the years 1982-1995 (n = 681 123).

Methods: The girls were followed until the year 2010 for a diagnosis of PCOS. We estimated the associations between maternal body mass index (BMI), smoking, and size at birth with the risk of developing a PCOS diagnosis. Risks were calculated by adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs). Main outcome measures A diagnosis of PCOS at 15 years of age or later.

Results: During the follow-up period 3738 girls were diagnosed with PCOS (0.54%). Girls with mothers who were overweight or obese had 1.5-2.0 times higher risk of PCOS (aHR 1.52, 95% CI 1.36-1.70; aHR 1.97, 95% CI 1.61-2.41, respectively), compared with girls born to mothers of normal weight. The risk of PCOS was increased if the mother smoked during pregnancy (1-9 cigarettes/day, aHR 1.31, 95% CI 1.18-1.47; >= 10 cigarettes/day, aHR 1.44, 95% CI 1.27-1.64). Being born small for gestational age (SGA) was associated with a later diagnosis of PCOS in crude estimates, but the association was not significant after adjusting for maternal factors.

Conclusions: Maternal smoking and increased BMI appear to increase the risk of PCOS in offspring. The association between SGA and the development of PCOS appears to be mediated by maternal factors.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
WILEY, 2019
Keywords
Birthweight, body mass index, polycystic ovary syndrome, prenatal care, smoking
National Category
Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-372879 (URN)10.1111/1471-0528.15236 (DOI)000452871600023 ()29896923 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2013-2429Swedish Research Council, 2014-3561
Available from: 2019-01-10 Created: 2019-01-10 Last updated: 2019-04-25Bibliographically approved
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Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-2491-2042

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