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Papadopoulos, FotiosORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-8692-3652
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Publications (10 of 41) Show all publications
Iliadis, S. I., Skalkidou, A., Ranstrand, H., Greorgakis, M. K., Axfors, C. & Papadopoulos, F. (2018). Self-Harm Thoughts Postpartum as a Marker for Long-Term Morbidity. Frontiers In Public Health
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Self-Harm Thoughts Postpartum as a Marker for Long-Term Morbidity
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2018 (English)In: Frontiers In Public Health, ISSN 2296-2565Article in journal (Refereed) Published
National Category
Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-342783 (URN)
Available from: 2018-02-23 Created: 2018-02-23 Last updated: 2018-03-15Bibliographically approved
Iliadis, S. I., Skalkidou, A., Ranstrand, H., Georgakis, M. K., Axfors, C. & Papadopoulos, F. (2018). Self-Harm Thoughts Postpartum as a Marker for Long-Term Morbidity. Frontiers In Public Health, 6, Article ID 34.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Self-Harm Thoughts Postpartum as a Marker for Long-Term Morbidity
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2018 (English)In: Frontiers In Public Health, ISSN 2296-2565, Vol. 6, article id 34Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction: Postpartum depression predisposes to maternal affective and somatic disorders. It is important to identify which women are at an increased risk of subsequent morbidity and would benefit from an intensified follow-up. Self-harm thoughts (SHTs), with or without other depressive symptomatology, might have prognostic value for maternal health beyond the postpartum period. Aim: This study is to investigate the somatic and psychiatric morbidity of postpartum women with SHTs, with or without other depressive symptoms, over a 7-year follow-up period. Materials and methods: The subjects for this study are derived from a population based Swedish cohort of women who gave birth at Uppsala University Hospital (May 2006-June 2007) and who answered the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) at 5 days, 6 weeks, and 6 months postpartum. Three groups were included: women reporting SHTs (SHT group, n = 107) on item 10 of the EPDS; women reporting depressive symptoms, i.e., EPDS >= 12 at 6 weeks and/or 6 months postpartum, without SHTs (DEP group, n = 94); and randomly selected controls screening negatively for postpartum depression (CTL group, n = 104). The number of diagnostic codes for somatic and psychiatric morbidity according to the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems system, and the number of medical interventions were retrieved from medical records over 7 years following childbirth and were used as the outcome measures, together with any prescription of antidepressants and sick leave during the follow-up. Results: The SHT group had the highest psychiatric morbidity of all groups and more somatic morbidity than controls. Affective disorders were more common in the SHT and the DEP groups compared with controls, as well as antidepressant prescriptions and sick leave. One-fifth of women with SHTs did not screen positive for depressive symptoms; nevertheless, they had more somatic and psychiatric morbidity than the control group. Conclusion: Women reporting thoughts of self-harm in the postpartum period are at an increased risk of somatic and psychiatric morbidity during a follow-up of 7 years after delivery, and this increased risk may not be fully attributed to depressive symptoms. Results underline the importance of screening for self-harm symptoms postpartum and point to a need for individualized follow-up.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
FRONTIERS MEDIA SA, 2018
Keywords
self-harm, postpartum depression, maternal morbidity, pregnancy, postpartum period, psychiatric morbidity
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-348914 (URN)10.3389/fpubh.2018.00034 (DOI)000425815300001 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 523-2014-2342Swedish Society for Medical Research (SSMF), SLS-250581Marianne and Marcus Wallenberg Foundation, MMW2011.0115
Available from: 2018-04-25 Created: 2018-04-25 Last updated: 2018-04-25Bibliographically approved
Bens, A., Papadopoulos, F., Pukkala, E., Ekbom, A., Gissler, M. & Mellemkjaer, L. (2018). Worse survival after breast cancer in women with anorexia nervosa. Breast Cancer Research and Treatment, 168(2), 495-500
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Worse survival after breast cancer in women with anorexia nervosa
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2018 (English)In: Breast Cancer Research and Treatment, ISSN 0167-6806, E-ISSN 1573-7217, Vol. 168, no 2, p. 495-500Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A history of anorexia nervosa has been associated with a reduced risk of developing breast cancer. We investigated survival after breast cancer among women with a prior anorexia nervosa diagnosis compared with women in a population comparison group. This register-based study included combined data from Sweden, Denmark and Finland. A total of 76 and 1462 breast cancer cases identified among 22,654 women with anorexia nervosa and 224,619 women in a population comparison group, respectively, were included in the study. Hazard ratios (HR) for overall and breast cancer-specific mortality after breast cancer diagnosis were estimated using Cox regression. Cause of death was available only for Swedish and Danish women; therefore, the analysis on breast cancer-specific mortality was restricted to these women. We observed 23 deaths after breast cancer among anorexia nervosa patients and 247 among population comparisons. The overall mortality after the breast cancer diagnosis was increased in women with a history of anorexia nervosa compared with population comparisons (HR 2.5, 95% CI 1.6-3.9) after adjustment for age, period and extent of disease. Results were similar for overall (HR 2.3, 95% CI 1.4-3.6) and breast cancer-specific mortality (HR 2.1, 95% CI 1.3-3.6) among Swedish and Danish women. We found that female breast cancer patients with a prior diagnosis of anorexia nervosa have a worse survival compared with other breast cancer patients.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
SPRINGER, 2018
Keywords
Anorexia nervosa, Breast cancer, Survival, Epidemiology
National Category
Cancer and Oncology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-350273 (URN)10.1007/s10549-017-4618-5 (DOI)000426778200021 ()29235044 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-05-14 Created: 2018-05-14 Last updated: 2018-05-14Bibliographically approved
Bränn, E., Papadopoulos, F., Fransson, E., White, R., Edvinsson, Å., Hellgren, C., . . . Skalkidou, A. (2017). Inflammatory markers in late pregnancy in association with postpartum depression-A nested case-control study.. Psychoneuroendocrinology, 79, 146-159
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Inflammatory markers in late pregnancy in association with postpartum depression-A nested case-control study.
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2017 (English)In: Psychoneuroendocrinology, ISSN 0306-4530, E-ISSN 1873-3360, Vol. 79, p. 146-159Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Recent studies indicate that the immune system adaptation during pregnancy could play a significant role in the pathophysiology of perinatal depression. The aim of this study was to investigate if inflammation markers in a late pregnancy plasma sample can predict the presence of depressive symptoms at eight weeks postpartum. Blood samples from 291 pregnant women (median and IQR for days to delivery, 13 and 7-23days respectively) comprising 63 individuals with postpartum depressive symptoms, as assessed by the Edinburgh postnatal depression scale (EPDS≥12) and/or the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (M.I.N.I.) and 228 controls were analyzed with an inflammation protein panel using multiplex proximity extension assay technology, comprising of 92 inflammation-associated markers. A summary inflammation variable was also calculated. Logistic regression, LASSO and Elastic net analyses were implemented. Forty markers were lower in late pregnancy among women with depressive symptoms postpartum. The difference remained statistically significant for STAM-BP (or otherwise AMSH), AXIN-1, ADA, ST1A1 and IL-10, after Bonferroni correction. The summary inflammation variable was ranked as the second best variable, following personal history of depression, in predicting depressive symptoms postpartum. The protein-level findings for STAM-BP and ST1A1 were validated in relation to methylation status of loci in the respective genes in a different population, using openly available data. This explorative approach revealed differences in late pregnancy levels of inflammation markers between women presenting with depressive symptoms postpartum and controls, previously not described in the literature. Despite the fact that the results do not support the use of a single inflammation marker in late pregnancy for assessing risk of postpartum depression, the use of STAM-BP or the novel notion of a summary inflammation variable developed in this work might be used in combination with other biological markers in the future.

Keywords
Immune system, Inflammation, Perinatal depression, Postpartum depression
National Category
Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-319197 (URN)10.1016/j.psyneuen.2017.02.029 (DOI)000400201700018 ()28285186 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research CouncilMarianne and Marcus Wallenberg Foundation
Available from: 2017-03-31 Created: 2017-03-31 Last updated: 2017-06-01Bibliographically approved
Makris, G. D., Reutfors, J., Andersen, M., White, R. A., Ekselius, L. & Papadopoulos, F. (2017). Season of treatment initiation with antidepressants and suicidal behavior: A population-based cohort study in Sweden. Journal of Affective Disorders, 215, 245-255
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Season of treatment initiation with antidepressants and suicidal behavior: A population-based cohort study in Sweden
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2017 (English)In: Journal of Affective Disorders, ISSN 0165-0327, E-ISSN 1573-2517, Vol. 215, p. 245-255Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Decreased binding capacity of SERT in the prefrontal cortex has been observed in both suicide victims and suicide attempters. Moreover, some studies have shown that SERT has a seasonal variation with lower binding capacity in the spring and summer, which coincides with a seasonal peak of suicides. Our aim was to explore whether the season of treatment initiation with antidepressants is associated with suicide or suicide attempt and compare it with the underlying suicide seasonality in the general population.

Methods: Using Swedish registers, patients who initiated treatment with an antidepressant were followed up to three months for suicidal behavior. Cox regression analyses were used.Results were compared with the underlying seasonal pattern by calculating standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) for suicides and standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) for suicide attempts.

Results: Patients aged years had higher risk for suicide when initiating antidepressant treatment in the summer, and also a higher risk for suicide attempt when initiating treatment in the spring and summer. Young patients (0-24 years) presented a higher risk for suicide attempt when initiating treatment in the autumn. Patients with previous suicide attempt had a seasonal pattern, with a higher risk to carry out a suicide attempt in the summer and autumn. Results from the SMR and SIR calculations numerically support these findings.

Limitations: We used information of filling an antidepressant prescription as a proxy of actual antidepressant treatment. Patients with combination, augmentation therapy or those switching antidepressant during followup were excluded. Thus, our results refer to less complicated psychopathology.

Conclusions: Our results indicate an interaction between biological and health care-related factors for the observed seasonal pattern of suicidal behavior in the elderly, whereas psychological and societal factors may be more important for the seasonality observed in the younger patients.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV, 2017
National Category
Psychiatry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-326206 (URN)10.1016/j.jad.2017.03.028 (DOI)000401213300034 ()28343052 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Society of Medicine, SLS-175701
Available from: 2017-08-07 Created: 2017-08-07 Last updated: 2017-10-15Bibliographically approved
Henriksson, H. E., Sylvén, S. M., Kallak, T. K., Papadopoulos, F. & Skalkidou, A. (2017). Seasonal patterns in self-reported peripartum depressive symptoms. European psychiatry, 43, 99-108
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Seasonal patterns in self-reported peripartum depressive symptoms
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2017 (English)In: European psychiatry, ISSN 0924-9338, E-ISSN 1778-3585, Vol. 43, p. 99-108Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: In the peripartum period, the literature on seasonality in depression is still scarce and studies present varying findings. The aims of this study were to investigate whether seasonal patterns in postpartum depressive symptoms previously identified in a Swedish study could be replicated in a larger study, as well as to assess seasonal patterns in depressive symptoms during pregnancy.

Methods: This was a nested case-control study comprised of 4129 women who participated in the BASIC project and gave birth at Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden, between February 2010 and December 2015.

Results: Women who gave birth in October-December 2011 had an increased odds of depressive symptoms at 6 weeks postpartum, when compared with women giving birth in April-June 2011 (aOR = 2.42; 95% CI: 1.12-5.26). The same pattern was found among women with a history of depression. No other seasonal patterns for depressive symptoms during pregnancy or at 6 weeks postpartum were identified.

Conclusions: In general, no consistent seasonal patterns were found in peripartum depressive symptoms. Whether the seasonal patterns found in some studies during certain years may be due to other factors relating to specific years and seasons, such as extreme climatic conditions or other particular events, warrants further investigation.

Keywords
Peripartum depression, Antenatal depression, Postpartum depression, Depressive symptoms, Seasonality, BASIC study
National Category
Psychiatry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-332209 (URN)10.1016/j.eurpsy.2017.03.001 (DOI)000406391700014 ()28391103 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 523-2014-2342Swedish Society of Medicine, SLS-250581Marianne and Marcus Wallenberg Foundation, MMW2011.0115
Available from: 2017-10-26 Created: 2017-10-26 Last updated: 2017-10-30Bibliographically approved
Gogas, H. J., Karalexi, M. A., Dessypris, N., Antoniadis, A. G., Papadopoulos, F. & Petridou, E. T. (2017). The role of depression and personality traits in patients with melanoma: a South-European study. Melanoma research, 27(6), 625-631
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The role of depression and personality traits in patients with melanoma: a South-European study
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2017 (English)In: Melanoma research, ISSN 0960-8931, E-ISSN 1473-5636, Vol. 27, no 6, p. 625-631Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We explored the potential association of depression history and personality, evaluated through a robust questionnaire tool, namely the Eysenck Personality Scale, with disease risk and progression among Greek patients. A total of 106 melanoma patients and their 1 : 1 sex-matched controls were interviewed on the basis of a questionnaire comprising phenotypic, sociodemographic, lifestyle and medical history variables, as well as information on history of lifetime major depression. The Eysenck Personality Questionnaire, measuring the four personality dimensions (extraversion, neuroticism, psychoticism, lie), was thereafter completed. Adjusted odds ratios (ORs) for melanoma risk were derived through multiple logistic regression analyses, whereas potential predictors of survival were explored using Cox proportional hazards models. Sun sensitivity score [OR: 1.55, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.16-2.06] and major depression history (OR: 5.72, 95% CI: 1.38-23.73) were significantly associated with melanoma, whereas inverse associations of extraversion (OR: 0.90, 95% CI: 0.83-0.97) and psychoticism score (OR: 0.88, 95% CI: 0.78-1.00) were noted. These associations were more pronounced and remained solely among female patients; notably, decreased extraversion (OR: 0.86, 95% CI: 0.76-0.98) and psychoticism score (OR: 0.63, 95% CI: 0.43-0.91), as well as increased depression history (OR: 10.69, 95% CI: 1.43-80.03) were evident. Cox-derived hazard ratios showed nonsignificant associations of depression history and personality with disease outcome. Our data support the hypotheses that depression history and personality are associated with melanoma risk. No effect on survival after cancer diagnosis was observed. If confirmed in future studies, these associations may contribute toward better understanding the etiology of melanoma, enhancing health-related quality of life. Copyright (C) 2017 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
LIPPINCOTT WILLIAMS & WILKINS, 2017
Keywords
depression history, Eysenck Personality Questionnaire, malignant melanoma risk, personality traits, survival
National Category
Cancer and Oncology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-342666 (URN)10.1097/CMR.0000000000000380 (DOI)000415743000014 ()28800029 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-02-27 Created: 2018-02-27 Last updated: 2018-02-27Bibliographically approved
Georgakis, M. K., Papadopoulos, F. C., Protogerou, A. D., Pagonari, I., Sarigianni, F., Biniaris-Georgallis, S.-I., . . . Petridou, E. T. (2016). Comorbidity of Cognitive Impairment and Late-Life Depression Increase Mortality: Results From a Cohort of Community-Dwelling Elderly Individuals in Rural Greece. Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry and Neurology, 29(4), 195-204
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Comorbidity of Cognitive Impairment and Late-Life Depression Increase Mortality: Results From a Cohort of Community-Dwelling Elderly Individuals in Rural Greece
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2016 (English)In: Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry and Neurology, ISSN 0891-9887, E-ISSN 1552-5708, Vol. 29, no 4, p. 195-204Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the association of cognitive impairment (COGI) and depression with all-cause mortality and cardiovascular-specific mortality among community-dwelling elderly individuals in rural Greece.

METHODS: Cognition and depressive symptomatology of 676 Velestino town residents aged ≥60 years were assessed using Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) and Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS), respectively. Eight-year all-cause mortality and cardiovascular mortality were explored by multivariate Cox regression models controlling for major confounders.

RESULTS: Two hundred and one patients died during follow-up. Cognitive impairment (MMSE ≤ 23) was independently associated with all-cause mortality (hazard ratio [HR]: 1.57, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.13-2.18) and cardiovascular mortality (HR: 1.57, 95%CI: 1.03-2.41). Moderate to severe depression (GDS > 10) was significantly associated only with a 51% increase in all-cause mortality. A male-specific association was noted for moderate to severe depression, whereas the effect of COGI was limited to females. Noteworthy, COGI and depression comorbidity, rather than their sole presence, increased all-cause mortality and cardiovascular mortality by 66% and 72%, respectively. The mortality effect of COGI was augmented among patients with depression and of depression among patients with COGI.

CONCLUSION: COGI and depression, 2 entities often coexisting among elderly individuals, appear to increase all-cause mortality and cardiovascular mortality. Gender-specific modes may prevail but their comorbidity should be carefully assessed, as it seems to represent an independent index of increased frailty, which eventually shortens life expectancy.

Keywords
cognitive impairment; dementia; depression; elderly; survival; mortality
National Category
Psychiatry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-279109 (URN)10.1177/0891988716632913 (DOI)000379121600004 ()26917554 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-02-29 Created: 2016-02-29 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
Petridou, E. T., Kousoulis, A. A., Michelakos, T., Papathoma, P., Dessypris, N., Papadopoulos, F. C. & Stefanadis, C. (2016). Folate and B12 serum levels in association with depression in the aged: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Aging & Mental Health, 20(9), 965-973
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Folate and B12 serum levels in association with depression in the aged: a systematic review and meta-analysis
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2016 (English)In: Aging & Mental Health, ISSN 1360-7863, E-ISSN 1364-6915, Vol. 20, no 9, p. 965-973Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVES: To systematically review and meta-analyse existing evidence on the association between folate/B12, and depression among the aged people.

METHODS: Following PRISMA/STROBE guidelines, the Medline abstracts were retrieved using an algorithm comprising relevant MeSH terms. Publications on the association of folate/B12 serum measurements with depression were abstracted independently by two reviewers and included in both gender and gender-specific meta-analyses, following recarculations of published data as appropriate. The Newcastle-Ottawa scale was used to evaluate the quality of included studies.

RESULTS: Both gender data were contributed by 11 folate-related (7949 individuals) and 9 B12-related studies (6308 individuals), whereas gender-specific data by 4 folate-related (3409 individuals) and 3 B12-related studies (1934 individuals). A statistically significant overall association between both exposures of interest (low folate and B12 levels) and depression was observed (ORfolate:1.23, 95%CI:1.07-1.43, ORB12:1.20, 95%CI:1.02-1.42). Gender-specific estimates pointed to a statistically significant positive association between low B12 levels and depression only among women (OR:1.33, 95%CI:1.02-1.74); the gender specific associations of low folate levels with depression were, however, non-significant and of counter-direction (ORfemales:1.37, 95%CI:0.90-2.07; ORmales:0.84, 95%CI:0.57-1.25).

CONCLUSION: Low folate and B12 serum levels seem to be associated with depression in the aged. The gender-specific analyses are confined to a positive association of low B12 with depression among older women and call for further research in this direction.

Keywords
folate; vitamin B12; depression; meta-analysis; gender; geriatric
National Category
Psychiatry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-279110 (URN)10.1080/13607863.2015.1049115 (DOI)000381401500009 ()26055921 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-02-29 Created: 2016-02-29 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
Kask, J., Ekselius, L., Brandt, L., Kollia, N., Ekbom, A. & Papadopoulos, F. C. (2016). Mortality in Women With Anorexia Nervosa: The Role of Comorbid Psychiatric Disorders. Psychosomatic Medicine, 78(8), 910-919
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mortality in Women With Anorexia Nervosa: The Role of Comorbid Psychiatric Disorders
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2016 (English)In: Psychosomatic Medicine, ISSN 0033-3174, E-ISSN 1534-7796, Vol. 78, no 8, p. 910-919Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective To investigate mortality in anorexia nervosa (AN) with a psychiatric comorbidity. Methods Using Swedish registers, data for 8069 female inpatients with AN were retrospectively collected for 1973-2010. Mortality patterns were assessed using standardized mortality ratios (SMRs), Cox regression-derived hazard ratios, and incidence rate ratios. A control cohort of 76,995 women was used. Results Patients with AN and a psychiatric comorbidity had higher mortality rates did than those without a comorbidity. The SMRs for patients with AN and a psychiatric comorbidity were 5.4 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 4.6-6.4) and 18.1 (95% CI = 15.2-21.3) for natural and unnatural causes of death, respectively. The SMRs for patients with AN without a comorbidity were 2.8 (95% CI = 2.3-3.5) and 3.1 (95% CI = 2.2-4.1) for natural and unnatural causes of death, respectively. The adjusted hazard ratios for mortality from natural or unnatural causes were 2.0 (95% CI = 1.5-2.7) and 5.7 (95% CI = 3.9-8.2), respectively. Incidence rate ratios comparing patients with AN and controls, both with psychiatric comorbidities, suggest a negative synergistic effect of comorbid AN and psychiatric disorder on mortality, which was greater for unnatural causes of death. Conclusions Mortality in patients with AN was greater in the presence of a psychiatric comorbidity, and even more pronounced for unnatural causes of death and suicides. Substance abuse, especially alcohol use disorder, increased mortality from natural causes of death. These findings highlight the need for early detection and treatment of psychiatric comorbidity in AN, to potentially improve long-term outcomes.

Keywords
eating disorders, anorexia nervosa, psychiatric comorbidity, mortality, <bold>aHR</bold> = adjusted hazard ratio, <bold>AN</bold> = anorexia nervosa, <bold>BMI</bold> = body mass index, <bold>CI</bold> = confidence interval, <bold>ED</bold> = eating disorders, <bold>HR</bold> = hazard ratio, <bold>ICD</bold> = International Classification of Diseases, <bold>IRR</bold> = incidence rate ratio, <bold>SD</bold> = standard deviation, <bold>SMR</bold> = standardized mortality ratio
National Category
Psychiatry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-308779 (URN)10.1097/PSY.0000000000000342 (DOI)000386338900004 ()27136502 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Society of Medicine
Available from: 2016-12-08 Created: 2016-11-30 Last updated: 2017-11-29Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-8692-3652

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