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Huvila, Isto, ProfessorORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-9196-2106
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Biography [eng]

Professor Isto Huvila holds the chair in information studies at the Department of ALM (Archival Studies, Library and Information Science and Museums and Cultural Heritage Studies) at Uppsala University in Sweden and is adjunct professor (docent) in information management at Information StudiesÅbo Akademi University in Turku, Finland. His primary areas of research include information and knowledge management, information work, knowledge organisation, documentation, and social and participatory information practices. The contexts of his research ranges from archaeology and cultural heritage, archives, libraries and museums to health information and e-health, social media, virtual worlds and corporate and public organisations. Huvila has given numerous invited talks and published broadly on the topics ranging from information work management, archaeological information management, social media, virtual reality information issues to archival studies and museum informatics, ancient history and archaeology. He received a MA degree in cultural history at the University of Turku in 2002 and a PhD degree in information studies at Åbo Akademi University (Turku, Finland) in 2006.

Publications (10 of 113) Show all publications
Huvila, I., Moll, J., Enwald, H., Hirvonen, N., Åhlfeldt, R.-M. & Cajander, Å. (2018). Age-related differences in seeking clarification to understand medical record information. In: Proc. 12th ISIC Conference: . Paper presented at ISIC 2018, October 9–11, Kraków, Poland.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Age-related differences in seeking clarification to understand medical record information
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2018 (English)In: Proc. 12th ISIC Conference, 2018Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Series
Information Research, ISSN 1368-1613 ; 22:4
National Category
Human Computer Interaction Information Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-365189 (URN)
Conference
ISIC 2018, October 9–11, Kraków, Poland
Available from: 2018-11-09 Created: 2018-11-09 Last updated: 2018-11-12Bibliographically approved
Huvila, I. (2018). Alternatives to Being Information Literate. In: Serap Kurbanoğlu, Joumana Boustany, Sonja Špiranec, Esther Grassian, Diane Mizrachi, Loriene Roy (Ed.), Information Literacy in the Workplace: . Paper presented at 5th European Conference on Information Literacy, ECIL 2017, September 18-21, 2017, Saint Malo, France (pp. 813-821). Springer
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Alternatives to Being Information Literate
2018 (English)In: Information Literacy in the Workplace / [ed] Serap Kurbanoğlu, Joumana Boustany, Sonja Špiranec, Esther Grassian, Diane Mizrachi, Loriene Roy, Springer, 2018, p. 813-821Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In contrast to the relative abundance of conceptualisations of information literacy, the earlier research has placed considerably less attention on its alternatives. The findings show that there are shades of being less and non-literate beyond a mere lack of necessary skills or engagement in inappropriate practices. Information illiteracy can be experienced as a problem but it can also represent a conscious choice for delimiting and organising information practices. From a theoretical and practical perspective, this study suggests that both information literacies and information illiteracies should be taken into account in information literacy research and education, and when developing and deploying information systems and services to compensate for the lack of literacies.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2018
Series
Communications in Computer and Information Science, ISSN 1865-0929 ; 810
Keywords
Information literacy, Information illiteracy, Information anxiety, Satisficing
National Category
Information Studies
Research subject
Library and Information Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-340579 (URN)10.1007/978-3-319-74334-9_82 (DOI)978-3-319-74333-2 (ISBN)978-3-319-74334-9 (ISBN)
Conference
5th European Conference on Information Literacy, ECIL 2017, September 18-21, 2017, Saint Malo, France
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 340-2012-5751
Available from: 2018-01-31 Created: 2018-01-31 Last updated: 2018-02-02Bibliographically approved
Huvila, I., Enwald, H., Eriksson-Backa, K., Hirvonen, N., Nguyen, H. & Scandurra, I. (2018). Anticipating ageing: Older adults reading their medical records. Information Processing & Management, 54(3), 394-407
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Anticipating ageing: Older adults reading their medical records
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2018 (English)In: Information Processing & Management, ISSN 0306-4573, E-ISSN 1873-5371, Vol. 54, no 3, p. 394-407Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In spite of the general interest in health information behaviour, there is little earlier research on how older adults, who are still active in working life but approaching retirement, differ from other age groups. A survey with Swedish patients who had ordered and read their medical record was conducted to map the preferences and motivations of older adults (born 1946-1960) ordering a copy of their medical record, and using medical records based e-health and information services in the future. The results do not indicate an obvious linear relationship between age and motivation to use online health information but show several differences between the age groups. Older adults were less interested in communication with their medical doctor by e-mail. Yet, they had searched health information in the Internet during the last week more likely than young. They were more inclined to read medical record to get an overview of their health than young, but less confident that they understood most of the content or turn to their family and friends to seek help than the elderly. When compared to younger adults and elderly people, older adults are the least confident and least motivated to use online health information. It is suggested that older adulthood can be seen as a transitory stage of life when the need of health information increases and engagement with health changes. The results agree with prior research on the potential usefulness of (online) medical records as a way to inform citizens. However, specific provision strategies may be necessary to match the needs and motivations of different age groups.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ELSEVIER SCI LTD, 2018
Keywords
Health information behaviour, Medical records, Older adults, Health information, Personal information management
National Category
Information Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-352566 (URN)10.1016/j.ipm.2018.01.007 (DOI)000429398700004 ()
Funder
VINNOVAForte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2016-00623
Available from: 2018-08-08 Created: 2018-08-08 Last updated: 2018-08-08Bibliographically approved
Lauzikas, R., Dallas, C., Thomas, S., Kelpšiene, I., Huvila, I., Luengo, P., . . . Vaitkevičius, V. (2018). Archaeological Knowledge Production and Global Communities: Boundaries and Structure of the Field. Open Archaeology, 4(1), 350-364
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Archaeological Knowledge Production and Global Communities: Boundaries and Structure of the Field
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2018 (English)In: Open Archaeology, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 350-364Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Archaeology and material cultural heritage enjoys a particular status as a form of heritage that, capturing the public imagination, has become the locus for the expression and negotiation of regional, national, and intra-national cultural identities. One important question is: why and how do contemporary people engage with archaeological heritage objects, artefacts, information or knowledge outside the realm of an professional, academically-based archaeology? This question is investigated here from the perspective of theoretical considerations based on Yuri Lotmans semiosphere theory, which helps to describe the connections between the centre and peripheries of professional archaeology as sign structures. The centre may be defined according to prevalent scientific paradigms, while periphery in the space of creolisation in which, through interactions with other culturally more distant sign structures, archaeology-related nonprofessional communities emerge. On the basis of these considerations, we use collocation analysis on representative English language corpora to outline the structure of the field of archaeology-related nonprofessional communities, identify salient creolised peripheral spaces and archaeology-related practices, and develop a framework for further investigation of archaeological knowledge production and reuse in the context of global archaeology.

Keywords
archaeology-related communities; semiosphere theory; Yuri Lotman; digital heritage; nonprofessional archaeology
National Category
Archaeology Information Studies
Research subject
Archaeology; Library and Information Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-361747 (URN)10.1515/opar-2018-0022 (DOI)
Projects
COST-ARKWORK
Available from: 2018-09-26 Created: 2018-09-26 Last updated: 2018-11-07Bibliographically approved
Huvila, I. & Huggett, J. (2018). Archaeological Practices, Knowledge Work and Digitalisation. Journal of Computer Applications in Archaeology, 1(1), 88-100
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Archaeological Practices, Knowledge Work and Digitalisation
2018 (English)In: Journal of Computer Applications in Archaeology, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 88-100Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Defining what constitute archaeological practices is a prerequisite for understanding where and how archaeological and archaeologically relevant information and knowledge are made, what counts as archaeological information, and where the limits are situated. The aim of this position paper, developed as a part of the COST action Archaeological practices and knowledge work in the digital environment (www.arkwork.eu), is to highlight the need for at least a relative consensus on the extents of archaeological practices in order to be able to understand and develop archaeological practices and knowledge work in the contemporary digital context. The text discusses approaches to study archaeological practices and knowledge work including Nicolinis notions of zooming in and zooming out, and proposes that a distinction between archaeological and archaeology-related practices could provide a way to negotiate the archaeologicality of diverse practices.

Keywords
archaeological practices; practices; knowledge work; information work; digital practices; digital tools; technology
National Category
Archaeology Information Studies
Research subject
Library and Information Science; Archaeology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-361742 (URN)10.5334/jcaa.6 (DOI)
Projects
COST-ARKWORK
Available from: 2018-09-26 Created: 2018-09-26 Last updated: 2018-09-27Bibliographically approved
Rexhepi, H., Åhlfeldt, R.-M., Cajander, Å. & Huvila, I. (2018). Cancer patients' attitudes and experiences of online access to their electronic medical records: A qualitative study. Health Informatics Journal, 24(2), 115-124
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cancer patients' attitudes and experiences of online access to their electronic medical records: A qualitative study
2018 (English)In: Health Informatics Journal, ISSN 1460-4582, E-ISSN 1741-2811, Vol. 24, no 2, p. 115-124Article in journal (Refereed) Published
National Category
Human Computer Interaction Health Care Service and Management, Health Policy and Services and Health Economy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-299790 (URN)10.1177/1460458216658778 (DOI)000432068300001 ()27440056 (PubMedID)
Projects
DOME
Available from: 2016-07-19 Created: 2016-07-27 Last updated: 2018-11-12Bibliographically approved
Eriksson-Backa, K., Enwald, H., Hirvonen, N. & Huvila, I. (2018). Health information seeking, beliefs about abilities, and health behaviour among Finnish seniors. Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, 50(3), 284-295
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Health information seeking, beliefs about abilities, and health behaviour among Finnish seniors
2018 (English)In: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, ISSN 0961-0006, E-ISSN 1741-6477, Vol. 50, no 3, p. 284-295Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The paper presents a study that examines older Finnish adults' self-perceived capability to access, evaluate, understand and use health-related information, and their perceived ability to influence their health themselves, and the relationship between these factors and their current health, health behaviour and information seeking. Questionnaires were mailed by post to 1000 Finns aged 65?79 years, and a total of 281 completed questionnaires (28%) were returned. Of these, 273 were included in the study. Cross-tabulation and chi-square tests were used for the analysis. Results showed that both a stronger belief in one?s capability to master health information and to act in a healthy manner were positively linked to better health and health behaviour as well as more active information behaviour. These beliefs can be important factors for influencing certain health behaviours and even behaviour change.

National Category
Information Studies
Research subject
Library and Information Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-361746 (URN)10.1177/0961000618769971 (DOI)000443347600006 ()
Projects
HIBA
Available from: 2018-09-26 Created: 2018-09-26 Last updated: 2018-11-16Bibliographically approved
Huvila, I. & Ahmad, F. (2018). Holistic information behavior and the perceived success of work in organizations. Library & Information Science Research, 40(1), 18-29
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Holistic information behavior and the perceived success of work in organizations
2018 (English)In: Library & Information Science Research, ISSN 0740-8188, E-ISSN 1873-1848, Vol. 40, no 1, p. 18-29Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Surprisingly little is known about the relationship between perceived work success and information behavior. This study shows that holistic (versus organization-centric) information behavioral preferences are related to interaction and exchange oriented perceptions of the success of work. The findings were drawn from a partial least square structural equation modeling (PLS-SEM) based analysis of the survey data (N = 305) collected from employees of a large multinational corporation. The findings suggest that holistic information behavior is more strongly related to social measures of success, whereas their association with quantitative measures tends to be lower. From the perspective of information behavior research, the findings suggest that holism seems to be a similar factor to, for instance, task complexity or personality, which influences human information behavior and, for instance, perceptions of relevance. From a practical perspective, the study suggests that the promotion of specific facets of measuring success and patterns of information behavior can be used to influence the orientation of working between centrifugality and openness.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ELSEVIER SCIENCE INC, 2018
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-359685 (URN)10.1016/j.lisr.2018.03.004 (DOI)000435426700003 ()
Funder
Academy of Finland, 295743
Available from: 2018-09-07 Created: 2018-09-07 Last updated: 2018-09-07Bibliographically approved
Moll, J., Rexhepi, H., Cajander, Å., Grünloh, C., Huvila, I., Hägglund, M., . . . Åhlfeldt, R.-M. (2018). Patients' experiences of accessing their electronic health records: National patient survey in Sweden. Journal of Medical Internet Research, 20(11), Article ID e278.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Patients' experiences of accessing their electronic health records: National patient survey in Sweden
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2018 (English)In: Journal of Medical Internet Research, ISSN 1438-8871, E-ISSN 1438-8871, Vol. 20, no 11, article id e278Article in journal (Refereed) Published
National Category
Human Computer Interaction
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-365301 (URN)10.2196/jmir.9492 (DOI)
Projects
DOME
Available from: 2018-11-01 Created: 2018-11-12 Last updated: 2018-11-12Bibliographically approved
Huvila, I. (2018). Putting to (information) work: A Stengersian perspective on how information technologies and people influence information practices. The Information Society, 34(4), 229-243
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Putting to (information) work: A Stengersian perspective on how information technologies and people influence information practices
2018 (English)In: The Information Society, ISSN 0197-2243, E-ISSN 1087-6537, Vol. 34, no 4, p. 229-243Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Instead of merely subscribing to an unspecific inseparability in the co-constitution or mangle of information technologies and human-actors, there is a need for conceptual tools to describe and explicate the mechanics of how the enmeshment of technologies and human-beings is occurring in information contexts: how information technologies are both setting standards of the social conduct of information practices, and how people are using information technologies to regulate the social process. Building on an empirical study of human-technology relations in the context of archaeological information work, this article discusses how the imaginary of putting Stengers to work can make a contribution to such an end. Stengers describes an ideal system of human-actors and technology working seamlessly World-as-Clockthat is unattainable but can serve as a benchmark and a lens for understanding frictions and discrepancies in the cohesion of the two.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
TAYLOR & FRANCIS INC, 2018
Keywords
Technology, information technology, information work, archaeology, putting to work, sociomateriality
National Category
Information Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-357768 (URN)10.1080/01972243.2018.1463332 (DOI)000434448800002 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 340-2012-5751
Available from: 2018-08-23 Created: 2018-08-23 Last updated: 2018-08-23Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-9196-2106

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