uu.seUppsala University Publications
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Huvila, Isto, ProfessorORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-9196-2106
Alternative names
Biography [eng]

Professor Isto Huvila holds the chair in information studies at the Department of ALM (Archival Studies, Library and Information Science and Museums and Cultural Heritage Studies) at Uppsala University in Sweden and is adjunct professor (docent) in information management at Information StudiesÅbo Akademi University in Turku, Finland. His primary areas of research include information and knowledge management, information work, knowledge organisation, documentation, and social and participatory information practices. The contexts of his research ranges from archaeology and cultural heritage, archives, libraries and museums to health information and e-health, social media, virtual worlds and corporate and public organisations. Huvila has given numerous invited talks and published broadly on the topics ranging from information work management, archaeological information management, social media, virtual reality information issues to archival studies and museum informatics, ancient history and archaeology. He received a MA degree in cultural history at the University of Turku in 2002 and a PhD degree in information studies at Åbo Akademi University (Turku, Finland) in 2006.

Publications (10 of 124) Show all publications
Huvila, I., Moll, J., Enwald, H., Hirvonen, N., Åhlfeldt, R.-M. & Cajander, Å. (2019). Age-related differences in seeking clarification to understand medical record information. In: Proc. 12th ISIC Conference: . Paper presented at ISIC 2018, October 9–11, Kraków, Poland.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Age-related differences in seeking clarification to understand medical record information
Show others...
2019 (English)In: Proc. 12th ISIC Conference, 2019Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Series
Information Research, ISSN 1368-1613 ; 24:1
National Category
Human Computer Interaction Information Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-365189 (URN)
Conference
ISIC 2018, October 9–11, Kraków, Poland
Available from: 2018-11-09 Created: 2018-11-09 Last updated: 2018-12-18Bibliographically approved
Huvila, I. (2019). Authoring social reality with documents: From authorship of documents and documentary boundary objects to practical authorship. Journal of Documentation, 75(1), 44-61
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Authoring social reality with documents: From authorship of documents and documentary boundary objects to practical authorship
2019 (English)In: Journal of Documentation, ISSN 0022-0418, E-ISSN 1758-7379, Vol. 75, no 1, p. 44-61Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose In the context of organisation studies, Shotter and colleagues have used the notion of practical authorship of social situations and identities to explain the work of managers and leaders. This notion and contemporary theories of authorship in literary scholarship can be linked to the authoring of documents in the context of document studies to explain the impact and use of documents as instruments of management and communication. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach The conceptual discussion is supported by an empirical interview study of the information work of N=16 archaeologists. Findings First, the making of documents and other artefacts, their use as instruments (e.g. boundary objects (BOs)) of management, and the practical authorship of social situations, collective and individual identities form a continuum of authorship. Second, that because practical authorship seems to bear a closer affinity to the liabilities/responsibilities and privileges of attached to documents rather than to a mere attribution of their makership or ownership, practical authorship literature might benefit of an increased focus on them.

Research limitations/implications This paper shows how practical authorship can be used as a framework to link making and use of documents to how they change social reality. Further, it shows how the notion of practical authorship can benefit of being complemented with insights from the literature on documentary and literary authorship, specifically that authorship is not only a question of making but also, even more so, of social attribution of responsibilities and privileges.

Originality/value This paper shows how the concepts of documentary and practical authorship can be used to complement each other in elaborating our understanding of the making of artefacts (documentary) BOs and the social landscape.

National Category
Information Studies Economics and Business
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-372606 (URN)10.1108/jd-04-2018-0063 (DOI)000453074900003 ()
Projects
ARKDIS
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 340-2012-5751
Available from: 2019-01-07 Created: 2019-01-07 Last updated: 2019-01-16Bibliographically approved
Börjesson, L. & Huvila, I. (2019). Contract archaeology. In: Börjesson, Lisa; Huvila, Isto (Ed.), Research Outside the Academy: Professional Knowledge-Making in the Digital Age (pp. 107-122). Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Contract archaeology
2019 (English)In: Research Outside the Academy: Professional Knowledge-Making in the Digital Age / [ed] Börjesson, Lisa; Huvila, Isto, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2019, p. 107-122Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The rapid expansion of contract archaeology as the primary sector of archaeological knowledge-making in many developed countries make it an illustrative example of which effects the organization and re-organization of a particular knowledge-producing sector affects the conditions for how knowledge can be made. The proliferation of contracted extra-mural work in different countries has shown the importance of adequate guidelines and careful consideration of how and what to regulate to reach desirable outcomes. In addition, contract archaeology provides insights into the difficulties of keeping together extra- and intra-mural knowledge-making enterprises even when they share the same outspoken objectives.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2019
Keywords
Contract archaeology Archaeology Cultural heritage Fieldwork Quality Conditions Information sources
National Category
Information Studies
Research subject
Library and Information Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-372613 (URN)10.1007/978-3-319-94177-6_6 (DOI)
Available from: 2019-01-07 Created: 2019-01-07 Last updated: 2019-01-07
Huvila, I. & Börjesson, L. (2019). Epilogue. In: Börjesson, Lisa; Huvila, Isto (Ed.), Research Outside The Academy: Professional Knowledge-Making in the Digital Age (pp. 171-182). Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Epilogue
2019 (English)In: Research Outside The Academy: Professional Knowledge-Making in the Digital Age / [ed] Börjesson, Lisa; Huvila, Isto, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2019, p. 171-182Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Research outside of academia differs from academic research in many respects. Even if they are intertwined and often overlap, extra-mural research engages different stakeholders, it is disseminated using different channels, and the knowledge that is made in extra-academic contexts is often produced for different purposes than those within academic research. The chapters of the volume on research outside of academia highlight the need to understand what research means in different situations and that there tends to be a reason why knowledge making differs from one context to another. A comprehensive understanding of what research is and how and why it is conducted with different intra- and extra-mural conditions is a necessary premise to be able to evaluate and understand different types of knowledge, their premises, rationale and implications without ending up in uninhibited relativization or lack of understanding of how research can and cannot help people to know.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2019
National Category
Information Studies
Research subject
Library and Information Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-372608 (URN)10.1007/978-3-319-94177-6_10 (DOI)
Available from: 2019-01-07 Created: 2019-01-07 Last updated: 2019-01-07
Huvila, I. (2019). How Knowing Changes. In: Börjesson, Lisa; Huvila, Isto (Ed.), Research Outside The Academy: Professional Knowledge-Making in the Digital Age (pp. 155-170). Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan
Open this publication in new window or tab >>How Knowing Changes
2019 (English)In: Research Outside The Academy: Professional Knowledge-Making in the Digital Age / [ed] Börjesson, Lisa; Huvila, Isto, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2019, p. 155-170Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

As the contemporary society is changing, knowing and its premises and conditions change together with it. This chapter explores this change and its implications to knowledge making. The main argument is that much of the contemporary experiences of change in information and knowledge practices can be understood from the perspective of how the conditions of (un)naming and (dis)trusting individuals, groups and institutions are changing. Further, it is suggested that the most significant issue may not necessarily be the change of knowing itself but rather the question of what is considered to count as knowing.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2019
National Category
Information Studies
Research subject
Library and Information Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-372607 (URN)10.1007/978-3-319-94177-6_9 (DOI)
Available from: 2019-01-07 Created: 2019-01-07 Last updated: 2019-01-07
Börjesson, L. & Huvila, I. (2019). Introduction. In: Börjesson, Lisa; Huvila, Isto (Ed.), Research Outside The Academy: Professional Knowledge-Making in the Digital Age (pp. 1-19). Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Introduction
2019 (English)In: Research Outside The Academy: Professional Knowledge-Making in the Digital Age / [ed] Börjesson, Lisa; Huvila, Isto, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2019, p. 1-19Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Research takes place in a variety of organizations throughout the society. In contrast to university-based research, considerably less has been written about research and its informational premises and conditions outside academia. This introductory chapter introduces the edited volume on research outside academia and asks what is research, who are engaged in it and why, how knowledge making works, what challenges and opportunities there are, how research informs and how it is informed by different actors and sources in extra-academic institutions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2019
National Category
Information Studies
Research subject
Library and Information Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-372614 (URN)10.1007/978-3-319-94177-6_1 (DOI)
Available from: 2019-01-07 Created: 2019-01-07 Last updated: 2019-01-07
Huvila, I. (2019). Research Outside The Academy: Professional Knowledge-Making in the Digital Age. Basingstoke: Palgrave MacMillan
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Research Outside The Academy: Professional Knowledge-Making in the Digital Age
2019 (English)Book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

This book analyses the practical, information-related dimensions of professional knowledge making and communication in extra-academic organisations. It treats the sites where research takes place and where knowledge is created outside academia in the light, among other things, of new digital resources. It provides valuable insight into the practices through which extra-academic research data and results are produced and made available and the settings in which this takes place. With case studies of knowledge-making in government organizations and state research institutes, as well as in cultural and heritage institutions, this book broadens the perspective on knowledge sharing, communication and publication, and how knowing changes as a result of the professional knowledge-making practices in the digital age.Research outside the Academy is ideal for students at all levels looking for an introduction to the topic of research and knowledge-making in society. Moreover, researchers and professionals in the fields of library and information science and science and technology studies will find the book to be adding to previous understandings of scholarly documentation and communication. Chapter 1 Introduction.- Chapter 2 Environmental Research and Knowledge Production within Governmental Organizations.- Chapter 3 Making and Publishing Knowledge in Research Institutes.- Chapter 4 Making Knowledge Work: the Function of Public Knowledge Organisations in the Netherlands.- Chapter 5 Librarians Conducting Library Research: What is Happening outside the Academy.- Chapter 6 Contract Archaeology.- Chapter 7 Knowledge-Making in Business Organizations.- Chapter 8 Grey Literature and Professional Knowledge Making.- Chapter 9 How Knowing Changes.- Chapter 10 Epilogue.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Basingstoke: Palgrave MacMillan, 2019
Keywords
knowledge production digital technologies extra-academic practices policy development innovation knowledge-making research practices communication of knowledge
National Category
Information Studies
Research subject
Library and Information Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-372612 (URN)10.1007/978-3-319-94177-6 (DOI)
Available from: 2019-01-07 Created: 2019-01-07 Last updated: 2019-01-07
Huvila, I. (2018). Alternatives to Being Information Literate. In: Serap Kurbanoğlu, Joumana Boustany, Sonja Špiranec, Esther Grassian, Diane Mizrachi, Loriene Roy (Ed.), Information Literacy in the Workplace: . Paper presented at 5th European Conference on Information Literacy, ECIL 2017, September 18-21, 2017, Saint Malo, France (pp. 813-821). Springer
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Alternatives to Being Information Literate
2018 (English)In: Information Literacy in the Workplace / [ed] Serap Kurbanoğlu, Joumana Boustany, Sonja Špiranec, Esther Grassian, Diane Mizrachi, Loriene Roy, Springer, 2018, p. 813-821Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In contrast to the relative abundance of conceptualisations of information literacy, the earlier research has placed considerably less attention on its alternatives. The findings show that there are shades of being less and non-literate beyond a mere lack of necessary skills or engagement in inappropriate practices. Information illiteracy can be experienced as a problem but it can also represent a conscious choice for delimiting and organising information practices. From a theoretical and practical perspective, this study suggests that both information literacies and information illiteracies should be taken into account in information literacy research and education, and when developing and deploying information systems and services to compensate for the lack of literacies.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2018
Series
Communications in Computer and Information Science, ISSN 1865-0929 ; 810
Keywords
Information literacy, Information illiteracy, Information anxiety, Satisficing
National Category
Information Studies
Research subject
Library and Information Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-340579 (URN)10.1007/978-3-319-74334-9_82 (DOI)978-3-319-74333-2 (ISBN)978-3-319-74334-9 (ISBN)
Conference
5th European Conference on Information Literacy, ECIL 2017, September 18-21, 2017, Saint Malo, France
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 340-2012-5751
Available from: 2018-01-31 Created: 2018-01-31 Last updated: 2018-02-02Bibliographically approved
Huvila, I., Enwald, H., Eriksson-Backa, K., Hirvonen, N., Nguyen, H. & Scandurra, I. (2018). Anticipating ageing: Older adults reading their medical records. Information Processing & Management, 54(3), 394-407
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Anticipating ageing: Older adults reading their medical records
Show others...
2018 (English)In: Information Processing & Management, ISSN 0306-4573, E-ISSN 1873-5371, Vol. 54, no 3, p. 394-407Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In spite of the general interest in health information behaviour, there is little earlier research on how older adults, who are still active in working life but approaching retirement, differ from other age groups. A survey with Swedish patients who had ordered and read their medical record was conducted to map the preferences and motivations of older adults (born 1946-1960) ordering a copy of their medical record, and using medical records based e-health and information services in the future. The results do not indicate an obvious linear relationship between age and motivation to use online health information but show several differences between the age groups. Older adults were less interested in communication with their medical doctor by e-mail. Yet, they had searched health information in the Internet during the last week more likely than young. They were more inclined to read medical record to get an overview of their health than young, but less confident that they understood most of the content or turn to their family and friends to seek help than the elderly. When compared to younger adults and elderly people, older adults are the least confident and least motivated to use online health information. It is suggested that older adulthood can be seen as a transitory stage of life when the need of health information increases and engagement with health changes. The results agree with prior research on the potential usefulness of (online) medical records as a way to inform citizens. However, specific provision strategies may be necessary to match the needs and motivations of different age groups.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ELSEVIER SCI LTD, 2018
Keywords
Health information behaviour, Medical records, Older adults, Health information, Personal information management
National Category
Information Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-352566 (URN)10.1016/j.ipm.2018.01.007 (DOI)000429398700004 ()
Funder
VINNOVAForte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2016-00623
Available from: 2018-08-08 Created: 2018-08-08 Last updated: 2018-08-08Bibliographically approved
Lauzikas, R., Dallas, C., Thomas, S., Kelpšiene, I., Huvila, I., Luengo, P., . . . Vaitkevičius, V. (2018). Archaeological Knowledge Production and Global Communities: Boundaries and Structure of the Field. Open Archaeology, 4(1), 350-364
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Archaeological Knowledge Production and Global Communities: Boundaries and Structure of the Field
Show others...
2018 (English)In: Open Archaeology, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 350-364Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Archaeology and material cultural heritage enjoys a particular status as a form of heritage that, capturing the public imagination, has become the locus for the expression and negotiation of regional, national, and intra-national cultural identities. One important question is: why and how do contemporary people engage with archaeological heritage objects, artefacts, information or knowledge outside the realm of an professional, academically-based archaeology? This question is investigated here from the perspective of theoretical considerations based on Yuri Lotmans semiosphere theory, which helps to describe the connections between the centre and peripheries of professional archaeology as sign structures. The centre may be defined according to prevalent scientific paradigms, while periphery in the space of creolisation in which, through interactions with other culturally more distant sign structures, archaeology-related nonprofessional communities emerge. On the basis of these considerations, we use collocation analysis on representative English language corpora to outline the structure of the field of archaeology-related nonprofessional communities, identify salient creolised peripheral spaces and archaeology-related practices, and develop a framework for further investigation of archaeological knowledge production and reuse in the context of global archaeology.

Keywords
archaeology-related communities; semiosphere theory; Yuri Lotman; digital heritage; nonprofessional archaeology
National Category
Archaeology Information Studies
Research subject
Archaeology; Library and Information Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-361747 (URN)10.1515/opar-2018-0022 (DOI)000445372600001 ()
Projects
COST-ARKWORK
Available from: 2018-09-26 Created: 2018-09-26 Last updated: 2018-11-21Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-9196-2106

Search in DiVA

Show all publications