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Publications (10 of 40) Show all publications
Kreutz, J. & Nussio, E. (2019). Destroying Trust in Government: Effects of a Broken Pact among Colombian Ex-Combatants. International Studies Quarterly, 63(4), 1175-1188
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Destroying Trust in Government: Effects of a Broken Pact among Colombian Ex-Combatants
2019 (English)In: International Studies Quarterly, ISSN 0020-8833, E-ISSN 1468-2478, Vol. 63, no 4, p. 1175-1188Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Mistrust between conflict parties after civil war is a major hurdle to sustainable peace. However, existing research focuses on elite interactions and has not examined the trust relationship between government and rank-and-file members of armed groups, despite their importance for postconflict stability. We use the unexpected decision of the Colombian government to extradite top-level former paramilitary leaders to the United States in 2008 to identify how a peace deal reversal influences ex-combatants’ trust in government. In theory, they may lose trust for instrumental reasons, if they suffer personal costs, or for normative reasons, if they think the government is failing its commitments. Using quasi-experimental survey evidence, we find that extradition decreases trust substantially among ex-paramilitaries, but not in a comparison group of ex-guerrillas not part of the same peace deal. Even though paramilitaries are seen as particularly opportunistic, our evidence suggests that normative rather than instrumentalist considerations led to trust erosion.

National Category
Political Science (excluding Public Administration Studies and Globalisation Studies)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-400704 (URN)10.1093/isq/sqz058 (DOI)000509527100030 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2016-05734
Available from: 2020-01-02 Created: 2020-01-02 Last updated: 2020-03-11Bibliographically approved
Kreutz, J. & Hinkkainen Elliott, K. (2019). Natural resource wars in the shadow of the future: Explaining spatial dynamics of violence during civil war. Journal of Peace Research, 56(4), 499-513
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Natural resource wars in the shadow of the future: Explaining spatial dynamics of violence during civil war
2019 (English)In: Journal of Peace Research, ISSN 0022-3433, E-ISSN 1460-3578, Vol. 56, no 4, p. 499-513Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Previous studies on natural resources and civil wars find that the presence of natural resources increases both civil conflict risk and duration. At the same time, belligerents often cooperate over resource extraction, suggesting a temporal variation in the contest over this subnational space. This study argues that parties fight over natural resources primarily when they expect that the conflict is about to end, as the importance of controlling them increases in the post-conflict setting. In contrast, belligerents that anticipate a long war have incentives to avoid fighting near natural resources since excessive violence will hurt the extraction, trade, and subsequent taxation that provide conflict actors with income from the resource. We test our argument using yearly and monthly grid-cell-level data on African civil conflicts for the period 1989–2008 and find support for our expected spatial variation. Using whether negotiations are underway as an indicator about warring parties’ expectations on conflict duration, we find that areas with natural resources in general experience less intense fighting than other areas, but during negotiations these very areas witness most of the violence. We further find that the spatial shift in violence occurs immediately when negotiations are opened. A series of difference-in-difference estimations show a visible shift of violence towards areas rich in natural resources in the first three months after parties have initiated talks. Our findings are relevant for scholarship on understanding and predicting the trajectories of micro-level civil conflict violence, and for policymakers seeking to prevent peace processes being derailed.

National Category
Political Science (excluding Public Administration Studies and Globalisation Studies)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-400702 (URN)10.1177/0022343318821174 (DOI)
Available from: 2020-01-02 Created: 2020-01-02 Last updated: 2020-01-30Bibliographically approved
Brosché, J. & Kreutz, J. (2018). A responsibility to talk: mediation and violence against civilians. In: David Carment and Evan Hoffman (Ed.), International Mediation in a Fragile World: . New York: Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A responsibility to talk: mediation and violence against civilians
2018 (English)In: International Mediation in a Fragile World / [ed] David Carment and Evan Hoffman, New York: Routledge, 2018Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York: Routledge, 2018
Keywords
mediation; one-sided violence; civil war; negotiations; human security
National Category
Other Social Sciences not elsewhere specified
Research subject
Peace and Conflict Research
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-381359 (URN)9781138297074 (ISBN)9781315099514 (ISBN)
Note

Ursprungligen publicerad i: Canadian foreign policy journal, vol 19, nr 1 (2013), s. 26-38.

Available from: 2019-04-08 Created: 2019-04-08 Last updated: 2019-09-12Bibliographically approved
Kreutz, J. (2018). New Rebels in Postconflict Settings: The Principal-Agent Dilemma of Peacebuilding. Peace and Change, 43(2), 218-247
Open this publication in new window or tab >>New Rebels in Postconflict Settings: The Principal-Agent Dilemma of Peacebuilding
2018 (English)In: Peace and Change, ISSN 0149-0508, E-ISSN 1468-0130, Vol. 43, no 2, p. 218-247Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article explores the processes that lead to different types of civil war outbreak in postconflict societies, combining quantitative analysis with case studies of Myanmar and Sierra Leone to disaggregate situations in which former rebels resume fighting from those when new rebels emerge in the postconflict environment. The analysis, based in principal–agent theory, illuminates how relations between the government and ex‐rebel elites, group cohesion among rebels, and the relationship between the government and the ex‐combatants all can lead to resumed civil war. Its findings suggest that victories and settled conflicts are the most important outcome for preventing conflict recurrence by former rebels, but do not prevent the rise of new insurgencies. Moreover, the absence of government repression emerges as the factor most likely to reduce the risk of new rebellion.

National Category
Political Science (excluding Public Administration Studies and Globalisation Studies)
Research subject
Peace and Conflict Research
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-349276 (URN)10.1111/pech.12284 (DOI)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2016-05734
Available from: 2018-04-24 Created: 2018-04-24 Last updated: 2018-04-25Bibliographically approved
Croicu, M. & Kreutz, J. (2017). Communication Technology and Reports on Political Violence: Cross-National Evidence Using African Events Data. Political research quarterly, 70(1), 19-31
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Communication Technology and Reports on Political Violence: Cross-National Evidence Using African Events Data
2017 (English)In: Political research quarterly, ISSN 1065-9129, E-ISSN 1938-274X, Vol. 70, no 1, p. 19-31Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The spread of Internet and mobile phone access around the world has implications for both the processe s of contentious politics and subsequent reporting of protest, terrorism, and war. In this paper, we explore whether political violent events that occur close to modern communication networks are systematically better reported than others. Our analysis app roximates information availability by the level of detail provided about the date of each political violent event in Africa from 2008 to 2010 and finds that although access to communication technology improves reporting, the size of the effect is very smal l. Additional investigation finds that the effect can be attributed to the ability of journalists to access more diverse primary sources in remote areas due to increased local access to modern communication technology.

Keywords
communication technology, conflict event data, media bias, civil war, spatial analysis, data quality
National Category
Political Science (excluding Public Administration Studies and Globalisation Studies)
Research subject
Political Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-315578 (URN)10.1177/1065912916670272 (DOI)000394649500002 ()
Available from: 2017-02-15 Created: 2017-02-15 Last updated: 2019-09-20Bibliographically approved
Bjarnegård, E. & Kreutz, J. (Eds.). (2017). Debating the East Asian Peace: What it is. How it came about. Will it last?. Copenhagen: NIAS Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Debating the East Asian Peace: What it is. How it came about. Will it last?
2017 (English)Collection (editor) (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Copenhagen: NIAS Press, 2017. p. 288
National Category
Political Science (excluding Public Administration Studies and Globalisation Studies)
Research subject
Peace and Conflict Research
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-321979 (URN)978-87-7694-219-9 (ISBN)978-87-7694-220-5 (ISBN)
Projects
The East Asian Peace Programme
Funder
Riksbankens Jubileumsfond, m10-0100:1
Available from: 2017-05-15 Created: 2017-05-15 Last updated: 2019-09-18Bibliographically approved
Brosché, J., Legnér, M., Kreutz, J. & Ijla, A. (2017). Heritage under Attack: motives for targeting cultural property during armed conflict. International Journal of Heritage Studies (IJHS), 23(3), 248-260
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Heritage under Attack: motives for targeting cultural property during armed conflict
2017 (English)In: International Journal of Heritage Studies (IJHS), ISSN 1352-7258, E-ISSN 1470-3610, Vol. 23, no 3, p. 248-260Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Although attacks on cultural property have caused international outcry,our understanding of this phenomenon is still limited. In particular, littleresearch has been directed towards exploring the motivations for suchattacks. Therefore, we ask: What are the motives for attacking sites, buildingsor objects representing cultural heritage? By combining insights from peaceand conflict research with findings from heritage studies we present atypology of motivations for attacking cultural property. We identify four,not mutually exclusive, broad groups of motives: (i) attacks related to conflictgoals, in which cultural property is targeted because it is connected to theissue the warring parties are fighting over (ii), military-strategic attacks, inwhich the main motivation is to win tactical advantages in the conflict (iii),signalling attacks, in which cultural property is targeted as a low-risk targetthat signals the commitment of the aggressor, and (iv) economic incentiveswhere cultural property provides funding for warring parties. Our typologyoffers a theoretical structure for research about why, when, and by whom,cultural property is targeted. This is not only likely to provide academicbenefits, but also to contribute to the development of more effective toolsfor the protection of cultural property during armed conflict.

Keywords
Cultural heritage; cultural property; attacks; motives; armed conflict
National Category
Other Social Sciences not elsewhere specified History
Research subject
Peace and Conflict Research; History of Art
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-308993 (URN)10.1080/13527258.2016.1261918 (DOI)000393883600005 ()
Projects
Attacks on Cultural Heritages: Causes and Consequences Examined from a Multidisciplinary Perspective
Funder
Magnus Bergvall Foundation, 2015-00813
Available from: 2016-12-01 Created: 2016-12-01 Last updated: 2018-01-02Bibliographically approved
Kreutz, J. & Bjarnegård, E. (2017). Introduction: Debating Peace, Debating East Asia. In: Elin Bjarnegård, Joakim Kreutz (Ed.), Debating the East Asian Peace: What it is. How it came about. Will it last?. Copenhagen: NIAS Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Introduction: Debating Peace, Debating East Asia
2017 (English)In: Debating the East Asian Peace: What it is. How it came about. Will it last? / [ed] Elin Bjarnegård, Joakim Kreutz, Copenhagen: NIAS Press , 2017Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Copenhagen: NIAS Press, 2017
Series
NIAS Studies in Asian Topics, ISSN 0142-6028 ; 60
National Category
Political Science (excluding Public Administration Studies and Globalisation Studies)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-403411 (URN)978-87-7694-219-9 (ISBN)
Funder
Riksbankens Jubileumsfond
Available from: 2020-01-28 Created: 2020-01-28 Last updated: 2020-01-30Bibliographically approved
Kreutz, J. (2017). Peace by external withdrawal. In: Elin Bjarnegård, Joakim Kreutz (Ed.), Debating the East Asian Peace: What it is. How it came about. Will it last?. Copenhagen: NIAS Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Peace by external withdrawal
2017 (English)In: Debating the East Asian Peace: What it is. How it came about. Will it last? / [ed] Elin Bjarnegård, Joakim Kreutz, Copenhagen: NIAS Press , 2017Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Copenhagen: NIAS Press, 2017
Series
NIAS Studies in Asian Topics, ISSN 0142-6028 ; 60
National Category
Political Science (excluding Public Administration Studies and Globalisation Studies)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-403410 (URN)978-87-7694-219-9 (ISBN)
Funder
Riksbankens Jubileumsfond
Available from: 2020-01-28 Created: 2020-01-28 Last updated: 2020-01-30Bibliographically approved
Kreutz, J., Bjarnegård, E., Eck, K., Guthrie, H., Melander, E., Svensson, I. & Tönnesson, S. (2017). The East Asian Peace - Will it last?. In: Elin Bjarnegård, Joakim Kreutz (Ed.), Debating the East Asian Peace: What it is. How it came about. Will it last?. Copenhagen: NIAS Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The East Asian Peace - Will it last?
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2017 (English)In: Debating the East Asian Peace: What it is. How it came about. Will it last? / [ed] Elin Bjarnegård, Joakim Kreutz, Copenhagen: NIAS Press , 2017Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Copenhagen: NIAS Press, 2017
Series
NIAS Studies in Asian Topics, ISSN 0142-6028 ; 60
National Category
Political Science (excluding Public Administration Studies and Globalisation Studies)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-403412 (URN)978-87-7694-219-9 (ISBN)
Funder
Riksbankens Jubileumsfond
Available from: 2020-01-28 Created: 2020-01-28 Last updated: 2020-01-30Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-0650-2127

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